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Old 12-01-2013, 12:23 AM   #31
sphyrnidus
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The fact that energy will go somewhere is very true. Like with the ski boots. It used to be ankles being trashed, nowadays it's the knees that get severed.

I wear BMW Santana boots, the only boots I found in size 13 that give good shin protection and are overall quite sturdy. And I can also walk on them for quite a while.
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Old 12-01-2013, 04:55 AM   #32
espressodrinker
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BMW Santiago boots

If you mean the BMW Santiago boot, they really don't give any ankle protection at all. The only way to really protect your feet and ankles is to wear motocross boots.
If you want to walk in them, then the hinged Sidi crossfire will help a bit, but they are still a bit too stiff to walk long distances in. (And they squeak like hell.)
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Old 12-01-2013, 06:56 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by espressodrinker View Post
(And they squeak like hell.)
you just addressed the elephant in the room for Sidi. I have to lube my boots up with WD40 at least a couple of times a year to keep them from squeaking. Just the nature of the beast when you are dealing with so many moving parts working on top of each other in a very tight area. I do find them to be very comfortable to walk in though, I'm not trying to take on hiking in them or anything, but they do just fine for me.
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:57 AM   #34
vanisle-motogirl
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Am I the only person who can't wear Sidi's? At least the street version (haven't tried a Sidi MX boot) but the ankle protection is totally in the wrong spot for me. It presses against my ankle in a bad way, to the point that I can't even walk in them.
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Old 12-01-2013, 05:23 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PT Rider View Post
Some info I have from fitting ski boots...

Many women have their calf muscle proportionally lower on the leg than a man. Combine that with often a narrower ankle, and properly made women's boots will be shaped to fit that narrow ankle and low, flaring calf. A man with the same length leg may likely have a thicker ankle and more slender calf. Everybody is different, so try on many and buy what fits.


Also noteworthy that the female internal malleolus is often lower than the male, making "fitted" shoes/boots hard to fit if not cut to address this protrusion. Some makers are better at this than others. This probably explains your fit dilemma 'Motogirl.

I agree with PT Rider: try on lots if you can!
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Old 12-01-2013, 08:05 PM   #36
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I think in a serious enough accident, no amount of gear is going to help, however, it may have turned this from a severed foot, to a crushed foot.
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Old 12-01-2013, 09:30 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by CharlieXR4 View Post
I think in a serious enough accident, no amount of gear is going to help, however, it may have turned this from a severed foot, to a crushed foot.
Actually any amount of gear will help some and you're right, it may have changed the nature of this serious injury to something less serious.
I came upon this interesting thread while shopping for new boots. Some very valid points being made, I wanted to comment. As an anesthesiologist who has a lot of experience in the trauma that makes it to the OR, the "typical" leg injury in my experience is what is called an "open tibia." When we see this, rightly or wrongly it seems clear that the tibia breaks (and sticks out the skin) right above where boot protection stops. I add that the people I see are NOT the ones wearing serious hard shell boots, but rather "engineer" type boots. Those people who we see with smashed ankles typically were wearing no boots at all, and commonly put their foot out when losing a low side.
While more protection may be better (or just transfer the injury to another site), it seems clear to me that a heavy leather as an abrasion resistant material that offers some significant increased ankle support may be the most important aspect of footwear and all other "improvements" offer diminishing gains. Just my opinion.
I am going to do a search of the medical literature on boot protection and lower extremity injury and motorcycle. If I come up with anything I'll post back.
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Old 12-01-2013, 09:37 PM   #38
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Ha, didn't take long for a first hit
From Dept of Defense
Wearing any type of boot provides a 53% reduction in risk of any foot or ankle injury, and a 73%
reduction in risk of an open wound injury. But armored motorcycle boots make a much bigger
difference in reducing the risk of an open wound injury (90%).


The longer article is http://www.defense.gov/home/pdf/0412.../DYK_USMC2.pdf

Still searching
An "open" injury means the skin is "broken" in ANY way, including anything from large gaping lacerations to scratches and road rash.
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Old 12-02-2013, 04:49 AM   #39
Earth Rider
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Originally Posted by passing through View Post
So my question is, has anybody found a boot that gives reasonable protection, and will allow one to walk many miles out of the boonies if the bike really breaks?
I know that the two requirements are pretty much diametrically opposed, just wondering if there is anything remotely useful as a compromise.
I was looking for the same thing and ended up getting the Gaerne GX1. I would have no problem walking miles in them.
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Old 12-02-2013, 05:13 AM   #40
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I'm a believer in buy more than you think you can tolerate. Just like helmets and all the gear, stiff, heavy, boots become natural and you'll come to feel naked without them. Pack sneakers if you do a lot of walking.

It would be nice if off road injury data were compiled with bike weight but I doubt we'll see that. My thought is riders go down at lower speeds on heavy dual sports and wind up pinning the foot or lower leg. Panniers would also be an interesting data point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayElDee View Post
Ha, didn't take long for a first hit
From Dept of Defense
Wearing any type of boot provides a 53% reduction in risk of any foot or ankle injury, and a 73%
reduction in risk of an open wound injury. But armored motorcycle boots make a much bigger
difference in reducing the risk of an open wound injury (90%).


The longer article is http://www.defense.gov/home/pdf/0412.../DYK_USMC2.pdf

Still searching
An "open" injury means the skin is "broken" in ANY way, including anything from large gaping lacerations to scratches and road rash.
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Old 12-02-2013, 06:19 AM   #41
Earth Rider
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Boots don't need to be stiff and awful to walk in to provide a lot of protection, though. Everything dual-sport is a compromise.
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Old 12-02-2013, 07:32 AM   #42
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One of the primary reasons I have not returned to riding after serious illness was finding suitable footwear. Aside from finding suitable external riding wear, footwear is a more severed problem. My feet are enormous, my specialty shoe maker figures my foot to be roughly equivalent to a size in North American terms, to be a 18, 9E. Which is about the same size as a shortened pair of fins used for diving. Extremely wide, and a long size in length, with an extremely high arch. Beofre i stopped riding due to health reasons; wore a pair of custom industrial style lace boots. From replies on this forum, this
would not be way to go if I could even find suitable footwear. And then there is the problem with continuing leg wounds that are reluctant to heal, moreso for those with diabetes which I don't have, thankfully.
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Old 12-02-2013, 07:38 AM   #43
Little Bike
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Originally Posted by Gregg Wannabe View Post
Funny how it takes an incident like this to reevaluate one's gear. I will only be riding with my Sidi Crossfires from now on with knee guards under my pants. After looking at the price of Klim pants I'm going to have my Rukka pants tailored to accept their large circumference.

Now the problem is what to put on my sweetheart's feet (the one in bright blue in the accident photo) I can't find a good pair of motocross boots for women. All I see are the entry level boots from Alpinestars, Sidi and Thor and they all look flimsy. Any ideas?
I wear Sidi Crossfires. I don't remember if I bought men's or women's. They fit fine, been wearing them for about a year and a half.

There is a huge lack of women's protective gear that is on the same level as what is available for men.
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Old 12-02-2013, 09:02 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougInKY View Post
Something to think about. The medical field has seen a change in injuries with the adoption of better motorcycle boots. Since the adoption of motocross boots by many injuries to the knee started showing up. The motorcycle industry responded by selling knee braces to the riding public. Now the medical field is seeing a large increase of hip injuries.
Same thing happened as skiing boots got stiffer in the 60s. However, I believe that a knee that only moves in one axis from (0-110 degrees) is much easier to repair than an ankle that is suppose to have 2-axis of freedom and 360 degrees!
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Old 12-02-2013, 01:05 PM   #45
Little Bike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passing through View Post
So my question is, has anybody found a boot that gives reasonable protection, and will allow one to walk many miles out of the boonies if the bike really breaks?
I know that the two requirements are pretty much diametrically opposed, just wondering if there is anything remotely useful as a compromise.
Probably not what you want to hear, but throw a pair of low ankle hiking shoes or tennies in your bag (or, if there isn't much sand, a pair of Tevas)
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