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Old 12-11-2013, 09:06 AM   #76
mrbreeze
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
The buckhorn handlebars, forward pegs, and big cushy seats are what made those '80s cruisers so comfortable. The current "beach bars" that are so common on cruisers today are absolutely miserable. Not much better than sportbike bars. The most comfortable bars out there are the ones that let you sit straight upright, and be able to reach them with a good bend in your elbows, so no weight gets put on your arms/shoulders. Despite some of the Vulcan 750's other issues, it does have a perfect riding position. That's a big part of the reason why I bought two.

then why do they build bikes the way they do? are they trying to copy Harley? why does Harley do it?

as for me, and I think most folks who hang out here, I prefer to have a little weight on the bars and the pegs. I want to sit MOSTLY upright, but I want to be able to raise my rear off the seat (feet are under me) so that I can shift my weight in the curves, and so I don't take a shot to the kidneys every time I cross a set of RR tracks. Having some weight on your arms and legs means less weight on your butt and spine. It also promotes good posture, which is helpful for both controlling the bike and long distance comfort.

I'm glad you found a bike that works for you, but you should realize most people do not find the feet forward riding position to be comfortable for long. It feels good in the showroom, but not 150 miles into a 400 mile day.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:26 AM   #77
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Originally Posted by mrbreeze View Post
then why do they build bikes the way they do? are they trying to copy Harley? why does Harley do it?

as for me, and I think most folks who hang out here, I prefer to have a little weight on the bars and the pegs. I want to sit MOSTLY upright, but I want to be able to raise my rear off the seat (feet are under me) so that I can shift my weight in the curves, and so I don't take a shot to the kidneys every time I cross a set of RR tracks. Having some weight on your arms and legs means less weight on your butt and spine. It also promotes good posture, which is helpful for both controlling the bike and long distance comfort.

I'm glad you found a bike that works for you, but you should realize most people do not find the feet forward riding position to be comfortable for long. It feels good in the showroom, but not 150 miles into a 400 mile day.
When I got my Spectre with its horrible bars, I actually was getting a cramp in my arms in the 6 mile ride to the house. The bars were swapped out the next weekend. They basically forced my elbows in to my sides and my wrists outward - felt more like a "tiller" on a boat than a handlebar.

The Superbike bar was superb. Completely neutral riding position.

One of the greatest things about the 4 cylinder "cruisers" is that since they were just slightly modified versions of the "standard" version of the same bike, they had the same, neutral/centered footpegs for a good, comfortable riding position. Unfortunately, some time in the late 80's they "discovered" forward controls, and then their bikes became much less comfortable.

I learned this the hard way riding a 92 Virago 1100 from North Carolina to Denver in 1996. By the time I got halfway across Kentucky my ass was killing me from having to support all my weight. I spent $300 (WAY more than was in the budget of a college student) on a new seat in Denver but that one was even worse - when I got back to NC I mailed it back to the manufacturer for a full refund.

It was after this that I realized the problem wasn't with the seat, it was with the seating position that placed so much weight squarely on my tailbone. The real problem with these bikes is that they might feel comfy when parked at the dealer but after a few hours in the saddle they're awful.

By contrast, when I rode the old beat up, neglected 1974 Honda CB750K from Denver to Tulsa in 1984, I was still up for riding even after 14 hours in the seat. My arms were buzzing from the vibration, but my back and butt were fine, thanks to the Honda's flat seat and neutral riding position.
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Old 12-11-2013, 11:57 PM   #78
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I also forgot that no one in the world should ever need dual front disk brakes because they are overly complex and dangerous. As is ABS.

And Jerry, don't take it personally, but when you repeat the same things ad nauseam it makes some of us tired and crabby. I've seen "160,000" in your posts 100 times if I've seen it once. You need to come up with some new material.
Yes, he even took one disc off the Vulcan 750 because it was dangerous to have 2. I forgot about that.
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Old 12-12-2013, 05:16 AM   #79
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You missed the part about the many, many flat tires every year.
Otherwise you nailed it.
Don't forget the fantastic Stella scooter, the 'real' man's scooter. It's just shy of perfect, only needing electrics that work and a motor that actually runs.
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Old 12-12-2013, 08:21 AM   #80
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Yes, he even took one disc off the Vulcan 750 because it was dangerous to have 2. I forgot about that.
I also forgot about that too and also the reason why he did it.
Maybe he will enlighten us with a JerryHism.
He also use to recommend cleaning parts and your hands with gasoline.
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:25 AM   #81
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I also forgot about that too and also the reason why he did it.
Maybe he will enlighten us with a JerryHism.
He also use to recommend cleaning parts and your hands with gasoline.
gasoline and a match?

Someone needs to collect all the JerryHisms and maybe we should have a sticky.







nahhh...
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Old 12-12-2013, 04:04 PM   #82
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If you really want to ride a bike all bent over, with most of your upper body weight supported by your arms and shoulders, and you neck bent all the way back (same as if you were sitting up straight and looking straight up at the sky), and your knees bent completely double, with your toes pointing straight at the ground, go right ahead. I ride a cruiser, with forward pegs and high bars BECAUSE most of my weight is supported by the seat. It's a big cushy seat, not a tiny little sport bike pad. Some of the weight of your arms is supported by the bars, and some of the weight of your legs is supported by the pegs. But 90% of you total weight is supported by the seat. I won't use a number this time, but I have ridden countless miles on bikes with such a riding position and found it extremely comfortable. The VN750, Spectre 750, and it's less fancy cousin, the KZ750LTD all seem to have similar riding positions. Doesn't look like you could go wrong with any of them.

One thing you can't do is mix forward pegs with low bars. That means bending forward at the waist, with your feet out in front of you bends and will cause severe lower back pain, and probably damage in long enough time. Yes I tried it. Many of the Harley clone choppers came with forward controls and drag bars. They were virtually unrideable.


As for the original question asked by the OP, I would not hesitate to buy a new Vulcan 750, but since that is no longer possible, I would not recommend buying a used one. To many issues that can cause very expensive problems if the previous owner did not maintain it properly, and very few do/did. They can last forever, but ONLY if they were seriously maintained, and their problems taken care of before they caused serious damage. Kawasaki advertised this bike as virtually maintenance free, but it is anything but. Many owners (myself included) hang onto them and fix their problems because they have a combination of power, handling, and comfort not found in very many bikes.
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Old 12-12-2013, 06:14 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
If you really want to ride a bike all bent over, with most of your upper body weight supported by your arms and shoulders, and you neck bent all the way back (same as if you were sitting up straight and looking straight up at the sky), and your knees bent completely double, with your toes pointing straight at the ground, go right ahead.
What mythical motorcycle is this ?

If you are describing a sport bike, then you obviously don't know how to ride one.
Very little weight should be supported by your arms and shoulders - you use your core muscles for that - if you have any.
Toes pointing straight at the ground ? Try riding on the balls of your feet, where they should be.
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Old 12-12-2013, 09:23 PM   #84
JerryH
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What mythical motorcycle is this ?

If you are describing a sport bike, then you obviously don't know how to ride one.
Very little weight should be supported by your arms and shoulders - you use your core muscles for that - if you have any.
Toes pointing straight at the ground ? Try riding on the balls of your feet, where they should be.
Yes I am referring to sport bikes. I guess I must not know how to ride one, because every one I've tried to ride has been absolutely miserable. My 54 year old body does not like being twisted up like a pretzel. I cannot ride a road bicycle either, and my last mountain bike, which I can no longer ride, had a cruiser seat and the bars raised about 4"

But I am not alone. I have had several younger guys in much better shape than I'm in complain about how painful riding a sportbike is. Apparently they think the fun outweighs the pain. Seems like everytime I see one being ridden on the interstate, the riders left hand is not on the bars.

I don't get why so many complain about how uncomfortable cruisers (with high bars) are. They are virtually the same as sitting in a recliner, cruising down the road. There are no stress points, other than the seat, which for some reason does not seem to bother me. It supports my 230 pounds all day long, day after day. Goldwings, which are NOT cruisers, have the same riding position, except the pegs are farther back (because the engine gets in the way) they have a totally upright riding position, and bars high enough that you don't have to lean forward to reach. Tell a Goldwing rider their bike is not comfortable.
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Old 12-12-2013, 09:44 PM   #85
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Yes I am referring to sport bikes. I guess I must not know how to ride one, because every one I've tried to ride has been absolutely miserable. My 54 year old body does not like being twisted up like a pretzel.
There are people with a lot more age and a lot more mileage under their belt than you, that are still riding sportbikes and loving every mile of it.

Just because you're all stove up with arthritis or bad hips or whatever the hell ails you.....doesn't mean that the bikes that don't work for you, aren't heaven on wheels to a zillion other people.

I've got 4 yrs on you and put 8,000 miles on my VFR1200 the first two months I had it. To you it would definitely be an implement of torture - I've read what you consider an intolerable ride.
One 800 mile day alone on the VFR12 probably would've hospitalized you, or maybe rendered you unable to type for a while....

If you could at least admit that other riders are fine with what you consider uncomfortable, you wouldn't get so roundly hazed on every thread you post in.

You are not the voice of experience talking to a crowd of noob riders, so you'd better get used to being taken to task every time you hit 'submit reply'.
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Old 12-13-2013, 02:56 AM   #86
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post

Yes I am referring to sport bikes. I guess I must not know how to ride one, because every one I've tried to ride has been absolutely miserable.



Seems like everytime I see one being ridden on the interstate, the riders left hand is not on the bars.





JerryH, why don't you just say a sportbike doesn't work for you, and let it go.

As far as riding with one hand, well, that means he doesn't need to hold himself up with his arms and wrist doesn't it.

I have already told you, I am over a decade older than you, and find riding a sportbike more comfortable for me.
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Old 12-13-2013, 04:04 AM   #87
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Originally Posted by JerryH
As for the original question asked by the OP, I would not hesitate to buy a new Vulcan 750
Come on, man. You said yourself that you had to disassemble the final drive on your brand new bike to verify that the thing was lubed- and it wasn't!

And that's not an infrequent occurrence.

I think you have battered motorcycle customer syndrome.

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Old 12-13-2013, 04:28 AM   #88
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
...
I don't get why so many complain about how uncomfortable cruisers (with high bars) are. They are virtually the same as sitting in a recliner, cruising down the road. There are no stress points, other than the seat, which for some reason does not seem to bother me. It supports my 230 pounds all day long, day after day. Goldwings, which are NOT cruisers, have the same riding position, except the pegs are farther back (because the engine gets in the way) they have a totally upright riding position, and bars high enough that you don't have to lean forward to reach. Tell a Goldwing rider their bike is not comfortable.
Goldwing seating is fine. I like upright posture - my TEX being a perfect example.

But for me, laying back "like a recliner" should be reserved for a recliner. I'm not trying to take a nap on my motorcycle. Try steering with the pegs from that position.
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Old 12-13-2013, 09:03 AM   #89
Süsser Tod
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Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
If you really want to ride a bike all bent over, with most of your upper body weight supported by your arms and shoulders, and you neck bent all the way back (same as if you were sitting up straight and looking straight up at the sky), and your knees bent completely double, with your toes pointing straight at the ground, go right ahead. I ride a cruiser, with forward pegs and high bars BECAUSE most of my weight is supported by the seat. It's a big cushy seat, not a tiny little sport bike pad. Some of the weight of your arms is supported by the bars, and some of the weight of your legs is supported by the pegs. But 90% of you total weight is supported by the seat. I won't use a number this time, but I have ridden countless miles on bikes with such a riding position and found it extremely comfortable. The VN750, Spectre 750, and it's less fancy cousin, the KZ750LTD all seem to have similar riding positions. Doesn't look like you could go wrong with any of them.
You are delusional

I had a Vulcan 900, you sat upright, feet forward and your arms extended. It felt awfully comfortable when not moving, it was like sitting on a couch!

But you know? Feet forward means that you can't use your legs to get your ass off the seat when you go across an expansion joint, or a pothole. Then you're sitting upright, with 90% of your body weight on the seat, that means that you will really feel that expansion joint in all your vertebrae, I could feel them to the base of my skull. It also meant that all of my weight was on my tailbone, and that got really painful. I can ride 12+ hours a day on my XJR1300, but that Vulcan 900 was a 1.5 hour at best, I usually had a back ache after 45 minutes, but the pain in my tailbone made it even hard to walk when getting of the bike in 2+ hour rides, it was a torture rack.

Seriously, just because you are old and arthritic and can't move it doesn't mean that the rest of the people are as messed up as you.

Sportbikes are not comfortable, they are race replicas and they are good at going around the track. But normal people, that means, not JerryH, knows that there are many other bikes out there that are not sportbikes. For example, sport tourers, ADV tourers, naked sportbikes. All of them let you have your feet under your ass, so you can use your legs, and you have a mild lean forward so you can also use your arms to support your body if you want.

Dunno how your thought process goes, but it seems to me that your brain just process Vulcan 750, HD clone or sportbike.
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Old 12-13-2013, 09:42 PM   #90
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OK, sport bikes do not work for ME. But it seems to be that most think they are fine for almost everybody, while cruisers are uncomfortable for everybody. Cruisers outsell sport bikes big time in the U.S. Somebody besides me must like them. I'm certainly not buying all those cruisers. Someone also posted several months ago that this site is "anti-cruiser" If so that means it is ignoring the largest selling segment of motorcycles in the U.S. Now if this were an adventure bike only site, I could deal with that. But why include street bikes, then ignore the most popular type of streetbike. Oh, I forgot about the Yamaha Bolt. It does seem like there is one cruiser here almost everybody likes. But I'd like to see how far someone has ridden one. How about a cross country ride report on a Bolt.
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