ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-18-2014, 05:55 PM   #76
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
Oh ya, I got one more story to tell. My wife gets back from a baby shower this afternoon. She says there was one other 50 something gal there and they were chatting about their husbands. Brenda says that her husband is working on this old Triumph motorcycle like Steve McQueen rode in some race back in the 60's. The lady comes back with "oh ya, that would be the 1964 ISDT. I know all about it." Wow. I'm impressed. How many women do you know that know about that? Then a couple of 30 something girls come over and ask them what they're talking about, and when they tell them they both say "Steve who?"
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2014, 06:33 PM   #77
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
I've been struggling with which silencer to use. I've tried several different ones. If this was a replica bike I would go with the 500 twin unit like the '64 ISDT bikes. But I decided that I wanted to retain the passenger pegs, and I wouldn't be able to do that with the 500 muffler. I'd like to be able to take my bride with me to an occasional bike night or something, and this bike is going to have a dual seat anyway, so it might as well have passenger pegs. So I decided to go with this sweet little Burgess silencer:



It was an easy fit, I just needed to make a hanger. I had some 1/4" by 1" 6061-T5 aluminum, so I cut off a hunk and commenced a whittling:









I gave it a little shine with a polishing wheel, but I didn't go too crazy. You can waste your life polishing. I decided this is shiny enough for a muffler hanger, if you leave a few flaws in the aluminum it almost looks like old chrome:





I'm happy with the look. I can't wait to hear it. The kick-starter clears it, so no need for a dent.





Other than that, I've been diddling with little things. I looked through my handlebar collection:



for something with a crossbar. I like the bend of the original bars though, and I couldn't find anything else that I liked as much. Also, to mount bars with a welded on crossbar I'd have to either replace or seriously molest my stock 'P' clamps:



So I decided to try clamp-on crossbar, which is on order, with the stock handle bars. I'll post some pictures when it arrives. I've also got a skid plate on order and I found a pair of original used '64 headlight ears that are also on their way. I'd been looking for those headlight ears for about a year, '64 was the only year that they had a round hole instead of a slot for the headlight mounting bolt. I'm still working on shocks, fenders, and a seat.

Other than that, I neatened up the fuel lines a bit, from this:



to this:



That's all for now. As always, I am interested in your comments and opinions.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2014, 07:44 PM   #78
k-moe
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Oddometer: 2,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotaildog View Post



As always, I am interested in your comments and opinions.

That isn't where that finger goes.
k-moe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2014, 09:08 PM   #79
bpeckm
Grin!
 
bpeckm's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Road Island
Oddometer: 5,661



Oh, you guys...
__________________
XS650 becomes a VT BackRoadRunner
Loving the 80ST
I love projects that take twice as much effort as should be needed. Should be an Airhead motto. (disston)
__________________
bpeckm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 05:26 AM   #80
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-moe View Post

That isn't where that finger goes.
Good catch.

Safety First.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 10:43 AM   #81
ttpete
Rectum Non Bustibus
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Dearborn, MI
Oddometer: 5,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-moe View Post

That isn't where that finger goes.
Use a pusher stick. And get the upper blade guide down where it belongs.
__________________
10 Ducati 1098 Streetfighter S - "Sleipnir"
09 Kaw Versys
67 Triumph Bonneville TT Special
"The problem with Socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money" _____ Margaret Thatcher
ttpete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 11:57 AM   #82
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
Use a pusher stick. And get the upper blade guide down where it belongs.
That's right. I raised it up for the picture, so you could see what I was doing. You'll notice that the saw isn't running. That isn't where my hand was when I made the cut, I was just having trouble clutching the iPad with one hand and clicking the button with the same hand, and paying attention to where my staged hand was.

Anyway, I'm honestly impressed with the experience and safety consciousness expressed here.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 03:03 PM   #83
Rango
Phaneropter
 
Rango's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2012
Location: Kingdom of Belgium
Oddometer: 1,109
Nice cleanup of fuel lines. Improved looks and functionality.

The worklift caught my attention. It seems it doubles as a ramp.
Especially its narrowness appeals to me. Practical.

Actually I liked the dent in the exhaust. It suggests stamina, like an old scar.
I admit, it is a silly thought and non functional, but so is a label.

Looking forward to sound and sight.
I rode a Triumph Scrambler once and was pretty delighted. Good feelings.
__________________
Moriunt omnes pauci vivunt
Rango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 05:55 AM   #84
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rango View Post
Nice cleanup of fuel lines. Improved looks and functionality.

The worklift caught my attention. It seems it doubles as a ramp.
Especially its narrowness appeals to me. Practical.

Actually I liked the dent in the exhaust. It suggests stamina, like an old scar.
I admit, it is a silly thought and non functional, but so is a label.

Looking forward to sound and sight.
I rode a Triumph Scrambler once and was pretty delighted. Good feelings.
Thanks Rango. As for the dent, I'll probably install one naturally, after the bike is running. If not a dent, at least a scratch, and if not in the muffler then somewhere else. I don't think the lift would work as a ramp, it weighs close to 200 pounds. If I had the space I'd have used a Handi Lift, but as it is I need the narrow one right now. Once I get the bike finished, I'll probably make a GoPro video out in the woods.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 10:16 AM   #85
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
I have a rebuilt set of vintage Koni's on the way, so I'm looking at the rear suspension. Bitsy seems to have some brake linkage alignment issues. The rear axle adjuster lines up directly with the brake lever return spring, effectively preventing me from ever adjusting axle position as the chain stretches. Here's a photo:



The other arrow is pointing at the brake torque stay. I included that arrow because I suspect that I have the wrong length torque stay for my swing arm. Based on the rest of the bike I probably have a 1969 swing arm with a 1964 torque stay, or a 1964 swing arm with a 1969 torque stay. If the torque stay were a little longer, or a little shorter, it could rotate the brake plate enough that the return spring would clear the axle adjuster. The illustrated parts book shows different part numbers between '64 and '69 for both the swing arm and the torque stay, but you can't tell what the difference is from the pictures. If anyone knows how to tell a '69 swing arm from a '64 swing arm, or ditto for the torque stay, I could use your help here.

The other brake linkage issue I have is that the rear brake rod is rubbing on the inside of the shock:



It is probably because the brake arm is slightly bent:



Or it may be another problem caused by the eclectic nature of this motorbike. I say that because the 1969 illustrated parts book shows what appears to be a straight, stamped steel brake arm like mine:



and the 1964 parts book shows what appears to be a curved one, possibly cast or forged steel:




So if anyone is interested in speculating on what combination of parts I have here, and how best to get them to play well together, I would be interested. I'll probably start looking for a 1964 torque stay and brake arm and see if that resolves the conditions. If I can't find those parts at a reasonable cost then I'm certain that I can fabricate a shorter torque arm, and straighten/bend my existing brake arm to work. It's not like this bike is ever going to be original anyway.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 10:49 AM   #86
ttpete
Rectum Non Bustibus
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Dearborn, MI
Oddometer: 5,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotaildog View Post
I have a rebuilt set of vintage Koni's on the way, so I'm looking at the rear suspension. Bitsy seems to have some brake linkage alignment issues. The rear axle adjuster lines up directly with the brake lever return spring, effectively preventing me from ever adjusting axle position as the chain stretches. Here's a photo:



The other arrow is pointing at the brake torque stay. I included that arrow because I suspect that I have the wrong length torque stay for my swing arm. Based on the rest of the bike I probably have a 1969 swing arm with a 1964 torque stay, or a 1964 swing arm with a 1969 torque stay. If the torque stay were a little longer, or a little shorter, it could rotate the brake plate enough that the return spring would clear the axle adjuster. The illustrated parts book shows different part numbers between '64 and '69 for both the swing arm and the torque stay, but you can't tell what the difference is from the pictures. If anyone knows how to tell a '69 swing arm from a '64 swing arm, or ditto for the torque stay, I could use your help here.

The other brake linkage issue I have is that the rear brake rod is rubbing on the inside of the shock:



It is probably because the brake arm is slightly bent:



Or it may be another problem caused by the eclectic nature of this motorbike. I say that because the 1969 illustrated parts book shows what appears to be a straight, stamped steel brake arm like mine:



and the 1964 parts book shows what appears to be a curved one, possibly cast or forged steel:




So if anyone is interested in speculating on what combination of parts I have here, and how best to get them to play well together, I would be interested. I'll probably start looking for a 1964 torque stay and brake arm and see if that resolves the conditions. If I can't find those parts at a reasonable cost then I'm certain that I can fabricate a shorter torque arm, and straighten/bend my existing brake arm to work. It's not like this bike is ever going to be original anyway.
The adjuster is always tight like that with the axle as far forward as it is. As you adjust the axle back, the brake plate will rotate clockwise due to the stationary brake stay and increase the clearance. The brake adjuster will then need to be loosened.

The straight brake lever is correct. It's bent out a bit and will need to be bent in until the brake rod clears.
__________________
10 Ducati 1098 Streetfighter S - "Sleipnir"
09 Kaw Versys
67 Triumph Bonneville TT Special
"The problem with Socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money" _____ Margaret Thatcher

ttpete screwed with this post 01-27-2014 at 10:54 AM
ttpete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 11:00 AM   #87
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
The adjuster is always tight like that with the axle as far forward as it is. As you adjust the axle back, the brake plate will rotate clockwise due to the stationary brake stay and increase the clearance. The brake adjuster will then need to be loosened.
Of course. That makes perfect sense now that you say it. I'm seeing things that aren't even there.

Thanks Pete.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 11:26 AM   #88
ttpete
Rectum Non Bustibus
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Dearborn, MI
Oddometer: 5,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotaildog View Post
Of course. That makes perfect sense now that you say it. I'm seeing things that aren't even there.

Thanks Pete.
I had to rethink that one. It's been almost 15 years since I restored my TT, and you tend to forget the little things.

One thing you have to understand is that the UK bikes came with 3.00-19/3.50-18 tires, and the US ones had 3.25-19/4.00-18 for the street bikes and 3.50-19/4.00-18 for the TTs. This made a difference in the sidestand length, and will need to be watched. The TT sidestand had a U shaped piece of metal welded under the foot to make it longer.

Another thing that's often installed wrong is the kickstart cotter that holds the lever to the shaft. It needs to be inserted from the rear with the nut facing forward. The lever will be almost vertical. If it's reversed, the lever will be back at an angle and look sloppy. The cotter needs to be driven home hard with a hammer and punch until it is solid, then the nut should be snugged up. If you try to pull it in using the nut, you'll strip it before it's tight enough and the lever will eventually get wobbly as the cotter gets chewed up.
__________________
10 Ducati 1098 Streetfighter S - "Sleipnir"
09 Kaw Versys
67 Triumph Bonneville TT Special
"The problem with Socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money" _____ Margaret Thatcher
ttpete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 11:51 AM   #89
Twotaildog OP
Old Poop
 
Twotaildog's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2002
Location: upstate Nebraska
Oddometer: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
I had to rethink that one. It's been almost 15 years since I restored my TT, and you tend to forget the little things.

One thing you have to understand is that the UK bikes came with 3.00-19/3.50-18 tires, and the US ones had 3.25-19/4.00-18 for the street bikes and 3.50-19/4.00-18 for the TTs. This made a difference in the sidestand length, and will need to be watched. The TT sidestand had a U shaped piece of metal welded under the foot to make it longer.

Another thing that's often installed wrong is the kickstart cotter that holds the lever to the shaft. It needs to be inserted from the rear with the nut facing forward. The lever will be almost vertical. If it's reversed, the lever will be back at an angle and look sloppy. The cotter needs to be driven home hard with a hammer and punch until it is solid, then the nut should be snugged up. If you try to pull it in using the nut, you'll strip it before it's tight enough and the lever will eventually get wobbly as the cotter gets chewed up.
My kickstand has already been lengthened by an inch or so, the PO had a welder cut it and weld in some round stock, so I might be OK on that one. I checked the cotter on the kickstart lever just now, it is installed from the back but it pulls through easily to the point that the nut tightens against the shoulder of the cotter and the lever is still a little wobbly on the shaft. I'll try a new cotter, I hope that's all it needs. Thanks again for pointing that out.

If you get a chance, throw some pictures of your TT up.
__________________
1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
Twotaildog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 01:22 PM   #90
ttpete
Rectum Non Bustibus
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Dearborn, MI
Oddometer: 5,338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotaildog View Post
My kickstand has already been lengthened by an inch or so, the PO had a welder cut it and weld in some round stock, so I might be OK on that one. I checked the cotter on the kickstart lever just now, it is installed from the back but it pulls through easily to the point that the nut tightens against the shoulder of the cotter and the lever is still a little wobbly on the shaft. I'll try a new cotter, I hope that's all it needs. Thanks again for pointing that out.

If you get a chance, throw some pictures of your TT up.
You can get cotters for oversize holes if the standard one won't come up tight.

__________________
10 Ducati 1098 Streetfighter S - "Sleipnir"
09 Kaw Versys
67 Triumph Bonneville TT Special
"The problem with Socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money" _____ Margaret Thatcher
ttpete is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014