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Old 01-27-2014, 02:08 PM   #91
Twotaildog OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post

Very nice. I'll bet your neighbors love those pipes.
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Old 01-27-2014, 07:12 PM   #92
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That is really cool TT-
I guess the TT Specials had TT in their SN?
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:39 AM   #93
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Originally Posted by Xcuvator View Post
That is really cool TT-
I guess the TT Specials had TT in their SN?
Yes. T120TT DUXXXXX.

They had 11:1 CR pistons and were rated at 55 HP. They also used an Energy Transfer ignition system and had 6 volt lighting coils in the stator.

They were the hot setup of that time, and it was common for owners to hang lights on them and ride them on the street. I set this one up that way for that reason. I used a 12 volt system similar to the T120 street bike's with a battery because the original one had none and the lights would go out if the engine stalled. I have all of the original electrics in a box on the shelf. I built the engine with 9.5:1 pistons and Megacycle 1060 grind billet cams.

Probably the rarest unit Triumph is the 1970 T120 Bonneville homolgation special. They were made in very small numbers using Routt 750 cylinders and pistons to make the engine legal for Class C competition in the US after the AMA changed the rules to 750 cc for all engine types. The SN for these is RT120R DUXXXXX.
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Old 01-28-2014, 07:52 AM   #94
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Does your bike have race history, Pete?
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:37 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotaildog View Post
Does your bike have race history, Pete?
I bought it as a stalled project from an individual who was well known for disassembling bikes and then losing interest in them. It was in boxes, but was 99% complete and correct. I'm pretty sure that it never saw a track because of the good condition. When these were used as dirt racers, the lower frame tubes usually become beat up and smashed, as did the exhaust pipes. My pipes are the originals and have the part number stamped in them.
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Old 01-29-2014, 08:55 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttpete View Post
I bought it as a stalled project from an individual who was well known for disassembling bikes and then losing interest in them. It was in boxes, but was 99% complete and correct. I'm pretty sure that it never saw a track because of the good condition. When these were used as dirt racers, the lower frame tubes usually become beat up and smashed, as did the exhaust pipes. My pipes are the originals and have the part number stamped in them.
Very cool Pete and you really scored.
There was a RT 120 at the local Vintage MC show in Corvallis OR a few years back.
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Old 02-01-2014, 08:54 AM   #97
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I went out of town for a few days and a bunch of parts arrived while I was gone:


The Koni's came, there's a skid plate, the new cotter for the kick start, a set of proper case screws and matching heli-coils, chrome half covers that I'll put on the Koni's, a set of used 1964 headlight ears / fork covers, some fender blanks (cutting, drilling, and polishing required), some number plates, and some assorted british hardware in commonly used sizes.

This is what the old kick-start cotter looked like, it was pretty worn. The new one tightened everything up:



The 1964 style seat also arrived. I wasn't sure if it I was going to be able to fit it to the '69 rear subframe, but it looks like with some modification to the hinges I can make it fit. The '64 seat sits a little lower to the frame, so I'll have to cut and shorten the hinges a bit, but I like the look a lot better. Then I'll need to find someone who can sew in a zipper. I also need to find a way to remove the lettering from the back of the seat where the zip will go, does anyone know a solvent that will remove the ink? Here's a picture of the seat:



Now I just need to get the snow cleared from the driveway and I can get to work.
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Old 02-01-2014, 05:28 PM   #98
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Removal of lettering.

A lot depends on type of ink used (superficial or deep going) and finish (varnish?).
If it is, as it looks, a 'gold' paint, that may come off relatively easy.

The universal, but aggressive, solution is acetone. Try with a cotton swab, carefully and give it time before assessing result. If it works, go ahead with caution, it will also affect underlying black paint.
Acetone is the main ingredient in nail polish remover.

Ether is another possible, less mordant, solvent.

I would anticipate at the very least, discoloring of the black, which can be touched up with leather dye.


Whatever the result, it will always be an improvement.
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Old 02-03-2014, 02:28 AM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rango View Post
A lot depends on type of ink used (superficial or deep going) and finish (varnish?).
If it is, as it looks, a 'gold' paint, that may come off relatively easy.
Thanks for the tips Rango. I think you're right, the printing just looks like it's sprayed on the surface. Whatever I end up using, I'll try it on a flap of vinyl under the seat first, to see what affect it's going to have on the black.
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1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
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Old 02-03-2014, 03:18 AM   #100
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After I got home from church yesterday, it pretty much took the rest of the afternoon to get the seat fitted. Part of the reason that it took so long, I suppose, is that I'm not as proficient at welding as I wish I was, so I spend as much time grinding as I do laying weld. Also, it was one of those fiddly jobs where you have to take a lot of time putting the seat on, looking at it, deciding what change to make, taking the seat off, making the change, and then doing it all again. In the end, though, it turned out well and I'm happy with the result.

First I installed the '64 style seat installed on Bitsy, which has a '64 main frame and '69 rear subframe, using stock 1969 style seat hinges which bolt to the bottom of the seat. I can't use 1964 style hinges, because that would require cutting a large relief in my lovely cast aluminum side cover, for clearance. Here are some pictures:







As you can see, in that configuration, the seat sat about right in the back but way too high in the front. It seemed like the seat needed to be lowered about 3/4" to 7/8" of an inch at the front hinge, but it's kind of hard to get a precise measurement so I decided to shorten the hinge more than was needed, then shim it back up with washers until it sat right. Once I knew how many washers it took, I would make a more permanent spacer that was the equivalent thickness. To shorten the hinge I cut about a 1 inch section out of it and welded it back together. Please notice the cut resistant gloves, vice grips for pushing, and correct upper guide height on the band saw :






After the hinge was cut and prepped I donned my fire proof leather pajamas and went out to the garage to weld. Sorry ladies, I didn't get a picture of that. After putting the seat on and taking it off about a hundred times I determined that the modified hinge needed to have a 1/4" shim under it so I fabricated one out of aluminum. In addition to modifying the hinge itself, I had to put a small (~ 1/8") dent in the seat pan where the front hinge mounts, for clearance. I also had to bent the latch tab on the other side of the seat inwards a bit, to align it with the latch pin. Here is a picture of the seat flipped up. Originally, the front and rear seat hinges, which bolt to the seat pan with two bolts each, were identical. You can see the unmolested rear hinge on the left and the modified front hinge with the aluminum shim under it on the right:






In this next view you can see the difference in height between the stock hinge on the rear of the seat and the modified hinge one the front:





Here are some pictures of the final result, which looks about right to me:








I know that doesn't look like much, but it ended up being about six and a half hours of fiddling around. Fortunately JJ Cale and friends were able to provide entertainment, via Pandora, for the duration. In retrospect, though, I should have thrown on some Peter Sieger in honor of his recent passing.

Other than that, I'm waiting on bolts sleeves for the Koni's, and I had to order a different spring compressor to work with them since mine won't, I'm waiting on the crossbar, l need to put that sump cover on, fabricate the left side bash plate, jack the bike up so I can tear the front end apart and mount the headlight ears and front tire, mount the back tire, take the tank off and redesign the wiring harness since I moved the switches, then there's those fenders.... Before spring I want to re-torque all the engine fasteners, set the valves, change the fluids.... Also, that 500 muffler is still sitting there looking at me. I might have figured out a way to install it without loosing the passenger peg. It seems like the dented muffler is a key identifying feature of the '64 ISDT bikes. Probably what I'll do is take the hammer to it and if it turns out OK I'll go ahead and mount it. Am I missing anything?



EDIT: I forgot, I was going to mention that I came across some good sketches of how the ISDT bikes of that era were modified for quick and easy maintenance:







Cheers....
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1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...

Twotaildog screwed with this post 02-03-2014 at 08:30 AM
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Old 02-05-2014, 05:51 AM   #101
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I drained and pulled the tank last night so I could start on the wiring. Of course, in the process, my drain hose slipped off and sprayed gasoline across my face, so the wife wouldn't come near me until I took a shower. By the time I got out of the shower she was asleep, so Daddy din't get no lovin'.

Anyway, Ed, the PO, had designed and built his own custom wiring harness. He did a good job. He's a Roadie who works for one of the popular country-western artists, on his sound equipment I think, so he knows his way around a circuit. I'm going to have to make some changes though, since I'm moving the switches back to the left side cover. Right now the ignition/headlight switch is in the headlight shell along with an ammeter that's not hooked up (fairly common practice) and two indicating lights, one for the ignition circuit and one for the lighting circuit. After sorting things out I decided to simplify things a bit; I'm going to eliminate the indicating lights and the ammeter so that the only wires going to the headlight shell will be the headlight wires. I ordered a 'blank' headlight shell with no switch, ammeter, or indicating light holes in it. That will be cool: when was the last time you opened a motorcycle headlight that only had headlight wires in it?

I've got about 150 yards of driveway to clear snow off of, and the Bobcat popped a hydraulic hose, so the wiring probably won't happen today.
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1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
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Old 02-07-2014, 07:00 AM   #102
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I scored a Fluke 116 yesterday. It has nothing to do with the bike other than it will get used during the modification of the wiring harness, but I felt like making a post. My buddy Paul owns the local pawn shop in Blair, NE. He was out of town visiting his son last week and I went to the pawn shop a couple of times during the week when the lady that works there needed help. So when I stopped by the Pawn Shop for a cocktail with Paul yesterday evening, they gave me this multi-meter to show their appreciation. I tried not to take it but they slipped it into my coat pocket.



Otherwise, no progress on the bike, my life is all about fixing equipment so I can move snow right now. My driveway is long and steep. The day before the snow hit both of my snow movers (tractor and Bobcat) decided to go kaput. I know the cold stresses everything, but it seemed beyond random. The Bobcat popped a hose and when I went to load it on the trailer to take it to the dealer, the engine heater shorted out so the little diesel engine wouldn't start. Try and find a new engine heater around here right now! You go to the farm stores and there's a bunch of empty hooks where anything that makes heat used to be.

Sorry for the rant... back to it...
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1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
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Old 02-07-2014, 11:03 AM   #103
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Wha...?

What was that you said?
Snow?

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Old 02-07-2014, 08:04 PM   #104
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Edit: That is a freaky amount of snow, Dan. The eastern states really got dumped on this year. I was passing through Charlotte airport last week on my way to Philly and had to wait an hour and a half for the plane to be de-iced. I don't think they do much of that in Charlotte.

Since we're posting pictures of our driveways in winter, I decided I want to play to. These are from two winters ago though, it's not as bad this year (yet).

This was the first, lighter, snow of the season, I think it was in December and it's about the same amount of snow that we have right now. The house is to the left, the first 20 yards of the drive are paved, and the gravel section extends about another 125 yards to the right of Bambie, through the trees:




This is the second snow of the season, much heavier, it was in February, iirc. The tractor is pointed up the gravel driveway and the tree branches are so heavily laden that I had to shake the snow off of them before I could even get through. This was my first winter living in the country, and I had to learn how to operate the tractor quickly:



Fun stuff. 40% chance today.

Good reason to stay inside and work on motorcycles.
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1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...

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Old 02-11-2014, 07:20 AM   #105
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A few bits of minor progress.

The main skid plate. They want close to $30.00 for a set of the 'J' bolts though, so I made my own from 5/16 'U' bolts from the tractor supply store:






I zinc plated them so they wouldn't rust:




...and mounted them up:






Then on to the shocks. I wanted to use the chromed half covers, to look like the '64 ISDT bikes, so I had to remove the springs. I had to use external spring compressors because the Koni spring retainers were too small to work with the endwise compressor:








The Koni spring retainers were a tiny bit too large to fit inside the half covers:






So I squared them up in the old Southbend:





... took about ten thousands off of them:





... and they fit right in to the half covers:





I set the rebound damping at one turn out from full CCW as a starting point, and put the shocks back together. With the half covers on I was able to use the endwise spring compressor:








On the bike:



Now that I look at them on the bike, they might have looked butter with the springs the other way around. Thoughts on that?








Coming up:

Fabricate the left side bash plate:






Wiring simplification:








Front fender, tire, fork covers, handlebars, controls, etc:






We'll be back, same Bat-time, same Bat-station. Thanks for watching.

.
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1916 Indian Powerplus - future Cannonball prospect
1964 Triumph TR6 - 50 year ISDT Tribute
1969 BMW R60US
KTM 640 ADV - Guzzi Centauro - Husky TE510 - other stuff
...sweet dreams and fine machines in pieces on the ground...
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