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Old 01-07-2014, 07:57 PM   #16
shrineclown
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rufus View Post
That is a good way to start a fight,....... NOT a good way to accomplish anything.
Agreed, sometimes the best thing to do is walk away. They get the hint, and you don't say anything you can't take back. Always try to remember....it is for the kids, and they are kids. Some parents are just unrealistic, and you will meet them up close. Try to think about the kids instead.
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:24 AM   #17
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Yelling at a kid for what he can't do is not coaching.
coach them "UP"
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:15 AM   #18
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I like the idea of having a 24 hour rule for any post-game discussions. Let the emotions subside before approaching the coaches with any concerns. The parking lot arguments I watched last season were bullshit. Having the BSC but hot mom go running into the dugout to yell at the coach was enough for me to find another team. (coach actually deserved that one, though.)

The one exception I have to this is if a parent is seeing something out of their kid that appears as if they are hurting, the way they are tossing the ball or if they seem to be stretching the soreness away. I saw last year that the coaches cannot notice all the little things going on with each player and I regularly went to the dugout and pointed out if one of the kids was showing something like this. My son was great at saying all was well even if his arm was hurting and his only tell is a little shake of that arm between pitches. I need to know if we're missing any of these signs, at least until we really get to know these kids and I don't see that happening until we have quite a few games under our belts.

I am under the assumption they really don't know anything right now. Most of them have never tried to steal a base, most have never faced another kid pitching to them, most have never pitched to another kid (especially when there is a brat on base stomping his feet up and down the line trying to distract him into balking). These kids are green and the parents, for the most part, have no idea what the competition will be like. I suspect there are going to be a few bubble burst within the first few games when they realize snowflake isn't quite yet the next Mike Trout like they thought he was.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:06 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Hodag View Post
coach them "UP"

ALWAYS end with a compliment, even when you have to get on a kid for something. If you can't find some kind of compliment then just say .....you can do better.



I coached kids wrestling for 15 years. During that time I only had 2 kids that I really truly didn't like. They were just like their dads, obnoxious, stupid, arrogant, lazy and argued with everything they were told to do. I couldn't find anything good to say to them or about them. Thankfully neither was around long.

It took me a few years but I finally realized that even the laziest kids out there think that they are working real hard.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:08 PM   #20
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coach them "UP"

I agree, but NEVER EVER tell a kid that he is doing fine when he isn't. False praise will bite you in the butt.
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:29 AM   #21
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Give a little extra attention to the lesser skilled players during practices. You'll be amazed at how much they can improve if someone will work with them. This is where a coach can really make a difference.
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Old 01-11-2014, 06:31 AM   #22
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The one exception I have to this is if a parent is seeing something out of their kid that appears as if they are hurting, the way they are tossing the ball or if they seem to be stretching the soreness away.
This very thing happened to me during Fall ball a couple of months ago. My Pitcher, a great kid BTW kept moving his shoulder around and taking a long time between pitches. I called time and went out and asked him if he was OK, he told me yes. As I was walking back to the dugout I saw his Dad walking over and he told me he's not right. I agreed and let him throw a couple more then went and got him. The kid was in tears afraid he let down the team, we talked about it and he understood. I will NEVER endanger a kids health to win a game, its a game...period.

We've already had sign-ups, tryouts are in two weeks and I plan on starting practices in three weeks with the opening ceremony and games first Saturday in March. Play Ball! Can't wait.

There is so much going on during practices and games you need some help. Our team has some dedicated coaches and the parents are cool too.
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Old 01-11-2014, 08:51 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rufus
Yelling at a kid for what he can't do is not coaching
Yelling at a kid for something you didn't teach them is also not coaching.
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Old 01-11-2014, 10:08 AM   #24
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I coached for several years. One thing we did was at the end of each practice, take a white board and discuss some of the finer points of the game, like what a cut-off man is and why you should throw to them.

Another thing we did related to mandatory play time rules was to bring in our subs at in the 2nd inning until waiting for the 4th or even start the 2nd string. Worked wonders for boosting a struggling player's confidence and allowed us to finish with 1st string players on the field in the case of a close game.

Had one undefeated year and proud to say that I had one youngster go on to play college and pro ball.

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Old 02-01-2014, 03:29 PM   #25
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I've volunteered to help coach my son's 10u travel team. ( ) I've never coached before and only played until about 13 years old, so my "expertise" in the area is lacking at best.


Oh you poor bastard. Good luck.
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:29 AM   #26
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Oh you poor bastard. Good luck.


It's going pretty well so far. Biggest issue is getting all the kids to the practice.

I guess maybe I should say getting the fucking parents to get the kids to practice. The families who have experience with kids in the better leagues understand how important it is for the kids to have as much field time as possible. The ones who don't manage to find all form of excuses as to why they can't make practice. Again.

Right now, we seem to have 6 solid hitters, kids with great hand-eye coordination. They are all fairly athletic in their natural form. I figure that same hand-eye will lead to them being pretty good with their gloves as well, and we did see that during the fall ball season. Being winter, we're sort of fucked for practicing any sort of fly ball shagging. I can only hope I am right and we have at least a core of kids who can play infield or outfield when called upon.

As to the kids and families who make half or the practices or less and don't realize the step up they've pushed their kids into (regardless the insight I've tried to provide), those poor souls have a seriously rude awakening coming when we get into the season. I just hope we can get them to the point where they don't crumble.

Maybe "Oh, you poor bastard." is a fitting reply.

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Old 02-11-2014, 06:43 AM   #27
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I've coached hockey since I graduated from college, everything from learn to play up to college (never a head coach at that level). Impossible to put everything in one online post, and there have been plenty of books written on the subject by people far wiser and more eloquent than I.

With over twenty years behind the bench, most important lesson I learned; great passion makes great players, NOT great coaching. So take the job seriously, not yourself.

One more thought; if you're not having fun, give it up. If your charges aren't having fun, change up what you're doing.
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Old 02-11-2014, 07:59 AM   #28
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most important lesson I learned; great passion makes great players, NOT great coaching. So take the job seriously, not yourself.

Boy howdy ain't that the truth........I have had state champion wrestlers who would have been champions no matter who coached them. My most memorable State Champion was a kid that never won a match his first year, only won 2 or 3 his 2nd year but was state champion his 4th year. This kid had no talent, No muscles and was slow and uncoordinated. But he was ALWAYS at practice and ALWAYS did what he was told. He was glad to be there and appreciative of any time we spent with him. For the most part, those who win are the ones who WANT to win.


Most high school coaches I have seen take themselves way too seriously. Most of them have no interest in seeing a kid do good unless they can take the credit for it.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:37 AM   #29
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If your charges aren't having fun, change up what you're doing.

This was the biggest thing I learned in my first few years of coaching. My wrestling practices were loud noisy and rowdy. If you walked into the middle of practice it would look like chaos. But it was organized chaos. I had some parent complain that I didn't control the kids good enough. I told them that we do it like this because this is what the kids like.
They are kids, the more you talk, the less they listen. I still remember the kid who told me " I don't wanna learn anything, I just want to wrestle". That would be an dumb comment from a high schooler, but it is an insight into the way kids think.
The more you can make things a game the harder they will work. If you make them run sprints they will whine and complain and put out minimal effort. Divide them up into teams and race against each other and suddenly they are actually sprinting. I used get balloons and have them race across the mat by blowing the baloon ( no touching the balloon), They would work until they nearly passed out and then get up giggling and laughing and want to do it again the next day. Instead of telling them to do 20 situps, say Lets see you can do the most situps. For the kid that can't do a single situp tell him that, -you got nowhere to go but up,- compliments (even for the lazy brats) will accomplish more than complaints. The elementary gym teacher here used to separate the wrestler from everyone else because it was a big deal for most kids to do 20 situps I had wrestlers who could do hundreds and hundreds of situps. And they were eager to show the gym teacher the other kids. This all came from making it a game, not demanding that they do it.

Before someone chimes in about playing games= not being competitive, let me tell you that i was the head coach for 12 years. I had over 25 individual State Champions and 10 or 12 National champions. On the team level we were State Champions twice, 2nd a couple of time, and placed 3rd or 4th a few times and placed in the top 3 a few times at national tournaments. But that is not important if the kids aren't getting some enjoyment out of it.

Make it fun and they WILL work hard and learn. It is very hard to do this and maintain enthusiasm. But it works if you can do it.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:47 AM   #30
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I like the balloon race idea. Similar to the crab walk race we do already.

We do have the team races already, but pair them up with one on each side of the field, and they tag back and forth. This lets us pair the slower kids with the faster kids and keeps things close.

Dodgeball at the end of each practice is a favorite for these kids.

Sit up "races" are tough because of The Karate Kid. I have to put two 10 pound medicine balls on his chest to slow him down - and he absolutely loves it. Kid has rattled off 200+ during a practice and only stopped because I told him he had to. "Daniel San" not allowed to race his teammates during sit ups.
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