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Old 01-11-2009, 10:32 AM   #1216
dicky1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinrider
Fwiw, I rode my TDM900 to my local bmw dealer, demoed the new F800GS there, then rode the TDM some more so I could have a good basis of comparison.

I have to say that the F800GS feels so much more modern than the TDM

The riding position like a motard/offroad bike, it really makes the TDM feel like a 100% street bike in comparison.

The engine response is amazing. The bike seems to be in the same ballpark as the TDM in terms of power, but the engine revs up so much faster. Blat, blat, blat, almost like a two-stroke. Very addictive

The bike's balance is perfect. Even though I've got just a 30" inseam and was using the regular seat it was very easy to lane-split through traffic. Suspension feels excellent as well, very plush yet firm, if ya know what I mean

The only area where the TDM is notably better is wind protection up front. The GS's shield is quite low, even though the shield itself looks fairly tall.

I didn't have an opportunity to take the bike on the highway so I can't say if vibration is an issue as Kevin Ash reported. The TDM certainly would be hard to top in this respect with its OD 6th gear.

No comment on the headlights either as it was daytime, but being H7s like the TDM's, I wouldn't be expecting too much.

Conclusion: If I could buy another bike now, I would say that the F800GS would be the perfect replacement for my TDM and my F650GS. Maybe someday...
Thanks for that twinrider yours is the first direct comparison between the two bikes I have seen & very helpful.
As a long distance bike the tank range and more buzzy engine would probably become irritating, on the other hand the responsiveness and off-road capabilities would make it more fun when the terrain dictated.
Actually the GS800 with a few mods ie slightly bigger/more torquey engine, bigger fuel tank & better screen would become a very desirable bike, maybe reliability would still be a question mark though?
Perhaps Yamaha will give us it all one day with a new Super Tenere?
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:26 AM   #1217
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Ditto on what was said above.
As a TDM owner for 11 years I went over to the 800gs, because despite all the mods made to the TDM it just wasn't dirt worthy enough. The TDM just does not enough suspension travel or ground clearance.
Even my 850 has a smoother running motor than the 800gs. The TDM is geared higher but still feels like it has a lower 1st gear ratio. On the highway the 5 speed is running about 1000 rpm slower than the 800gs and as a result less vibration. the GS is not bad until about 5,000 rpm than starts getting high frequency engine vibes. Unfortunately that is about 70 mph.
The gs has very light steering, which is unnerving to me because I am so used to the solid feel of the TDM. The gs is not skittish or given any hint of instability, it is just a feel I haven't got used too.
My modded TDM suspension felt plusher, though there is just a limit to how much was available. The gs transmits a lot of road feel back to the rider telegraphing every pothole and tar strip along the way. The TDM just soaked them up to the limit of the available travel then gave you harsh feed back.
As a road bike I enjoyed the TDM over the GS. Off road, the GS is much more capable.
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:43 PM   #1218
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm
Ditto on what was said above.
As a TDM owner for 11 years I went over to the 800gs, because despite all the mods made to the TDM it just wasn't dirt worthy enough. The TDM just does not enough suspension travel or ground clearance.
Even my 850 has a smoother running motor than the 800gs. The TDM is geared higher but still feels like it has a lower 1st gear ratio. On the highway the 5 speed is running about 1000 rpm slower than the 800gs and as a result less vibration. the GS is not bad until about 5,000 rpm than starts getting high frequency engine vibes. Unfortunately that is about 70 mph.
The gs has very light steering, which is unnerving to me because I am so used to the solid feel of the TDM. The gs is not skittish or given any hint of instability, it is just a feel I haven't got used too.
My modded TDM suspension felt plusher, though there is just a limit to how much was available. The gs transmits a lot of road feel back to the rider telegraphing every pothole and tar strip along the way. The TDM just soaked them up to the limit of the available travel then gave you harsh feed back.
As a road bike I enjoyed the TDM over the GS. Off road, the GS is much more capable.
Interesting, I think it all comes down to the fact that the GS800 is more focussed as a dirt oriented adventure bike and is a master of that. The TDM is eerrrh ??? an all-rounder, it can do everything reasonably well, for which we love and respect it, but is perhaps not a master of any sector. Its a bit like the faithful dog always waiting for it's masters whistle and happy to have a go at whatever it's master chooses.
Whilste for day trips you can choose which bike is most suitable from the stable, when you go on longer distance trips you need a bike that can perform reliably each day despite varying conditions and that I think is the strength of the TDM. If it needs any more positives how about cheap to maintain & reliable.
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dicky1 screwed with this post 01-12-2009 at 02:14 AM
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Old 01-11-2009, 05:30 PM   #1219
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I didn't notice any harshness with the GS's suspension. Maybe weighing about 225 lbs in my gear helped. Or maybe the GS sold in Japan has different suspension spring rates.
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Old 01-11-2009, 07:27 PM   #1220
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Please re read. The BMW is no longer harsh, (was out of the box), but you do feel potholes, large tar strips and other road imperfections. Not sure if it is the high speed valving, rigid frame, or some combination, but it was something I was not used to unlessl I maxed out the TDM travel. Now that was harsh.
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:15 PM   #1221
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm
...you do feel potholes, large tar strips and other road imperfections.
Sounds harsh to me
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:14 AM   #1222
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I love mine!

Had my 900 for a couple of years now and can't imagine changing it. It is a road bike though. I've thought about doing the Australian Duel Sport style conversion but not got round to it.

If you have a TDM you MUST join www.carpe-tdm.net
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:34 AM   #1223
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In the January "Ride Magazine" there is an article on bike build quality. One section is on paint thickness and the findings were (in microns)

Triumph 141, Bmw 133, Honda 125, KTM 100, Yamaha 59, Aprilia 50, Kawasaki 48, Suzuki 43. They appear to have tested 3 different models in each manufacturers range.

I found the results surprising, although paint thickness is only part of the story eg what preparation of the metal and/or plating, if any, takes place before painting
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Old 01-12-2009, 03:38 AM   #1224
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Masterbrewer tackles more dirt





http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=422893
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Old 01-13-2009, 10:13 PM   #1225
twinrider
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Lowering TDM900 footpegs?

Anyone know of a way to lower the footpegs on the TDM900? I've seen one kit online but it replaces the footpegs with tiny race-style ones. I'd rather keep the stock pegs and just lower them 30mm or so.
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:23 AM   #1226
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinrider
Anyone know of a way to lower the footpegs on the TDM900? I've seen one kit online but it replaces the footpegs with tiny race-style ones. I'd rather keep the stock pegs and just lower them 30mm or so.
Would not lowering them then make them drag the road earlier? If this is so wouldn't you be better off raising the seat height? Is this to decrease the bend at the knees while seated?

Cheers Rick
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Old 01-14-2009, 05:07 AM   #1227
twinrider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tee Dee Mmm
Would not lowering them then make them drag the road earlier? If this is so wouldn't you be better off raising the seat height? Is this to decrease the bend at the knees while seated?

Cheers Rick
Yup, bad knees. The seat's already high enough for my 30" inseam. With lower pegs I'd just hang off the bike more to reduce the lean angle

Or go slower
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:05 AM   #1228
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Hi twinrider, I know of several TDM owners who have lowered the TDM by letting the front forks come up a little through the steering yoke. Some including myself have done it to sharpen up the front end on the 850.
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Old 01-14-2009, 07:51 AM   #1229
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Thanks for the tip, Dicky, but I'd like to lower the footpegs a bit to reduce my knee bend, not lower the bike itself.
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Old 01-14-2009, 09:30 AM   #1230
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinrider
Thanks for the tip, Dicky, but I'd like to lower the footpegs a bit to reduce my knee bend, not lower the bike itself.
Perhaps together with Tee Dee Mmm's suggestion to raise the seat height?
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