'01 1150gs fork seals leaking

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by WhiteNoise, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. WhiteNoise

    WhiteNoise Adventurer

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    Alright I'm looking for some info. I bought my first GS March 2012 and have put a respectable 15,000miles on it myself. It's now at 56,000 and the fork seals have started slobbering like a pit bull in heat. I've researched the OEM part numbers I need/want on realoem.com and am prepared to make my purchase and perform the job myself.

    My question is would ya'll recommend me going back to the factory seals AND oil, or does someone have a better suggestion? I have looked back and couldn't find any posts on this; but I know I am not the first GSer to come to this point. I am 6'4" and weigh 230lbs. Most of my riding is commuting, but the bike does not go long inbetween mudbaths. I do ride two-up on several occasions as well. I just wanna know my options and know what others have done and had success with:ear
    #1
  2. tagesk

    tagesk Tuscan rider

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    BMW doesn't make oil, so what do you mean with "factory oil"?

    Any fork oil will do just fine.

    [TaSK]
    #2
  3. KSBEERHUNTER

    KSBEERHUNTER Been here awhile

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    Well, replace them!
    #3
  4. yellow 1150GS

    yellow 1150GS Been here awhile

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    You will probably want to replace the fork wipers (bmw calls them cups) too. Mine had a lot of small cracks that were letting the water in. I also bought the big metal washers as they get rusty. You will notice the new seals don't have the exposed metal in them like the old ones so there is no place for the rust to start. I couldn't believe how bad the seals got before they started to leak. Also be prepared to replace the fork oil. It doesn't really do anything other than lubricating the forks and I found mine was contaminated with water and rust particles. To keep from taking the front wheel off, I used a big syringe with tubing on it to suck the oil out of each fork leg, wiped them out with a rag on a long stiff wire and replaced the oil with the correct amount. Hope this helps.
    #4
  5. tjt94

    tjt94 Been here awhile

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    You and I are the same size and have the same bike. The fork oil does nothing for the suspension, it only lubricants the fork shafts. The fix is easy. Take the front tire off, remove the cap on the fork tube, drop it down and remove. Remove the plug at the bottom of the fork tube (no schringing) and drain oil. Replace plug. Remove old seal and o-ring on air bleed screw. Replace oil with measured amount. Put fork shaft back in. Finish reverse order of removal. Do the other side.

    All told, this job took me about 45 minutes including finding tools. Super easy. I did mine because the little o-ring on bleeder tore and oil was squirting up on windscreen and also making a mess on the fork tube.
    #5
  6. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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  7. tjt94

    tjt94 Been here awhile

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  8. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    true enough, the comments in there give the pros/cons to pulling the tube though that was the intended information to share.
    #8
  9. Pekkavee

    Pekkavee Been here awhile

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    #9
  10. Ron from BC

    Ron from BC Long timer

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    ....also don't over react to replacing the leaked fork oil. It's like blood, a little bit of blood splattered or dripped can look like a major crime scene when in fact it likely isn't that much.

    The OEM seals aren't that much dough in the event you're concerned about the exact size etc. If you don't have a seal puller a trip to Harbor Freight for $10 bux is a worthwhile investment as it can be a pain to get in there to remove them without pulling the tube.

    Likely take you 30 minutes for the first one an ten minutes for the other.
    #10
  11. holckster

    holckster dougholck

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  12. WhiteNoise

    WhiteNoise Adventurer

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    This is all excellent advice. I am a Certified Master technician for several car lines, but still fairly new to motorcycles. I have never replaced fork seals, but was expecting a big ordeal that would take several hours. I am replacing my rear tire at the same time, already have the new heidenau k60 waiting.
    #12
  13. WhiteNoise

    WhiteNoise Adventurer

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    Realoem.com is a BMW-specific parts catalog for cars and motorcycles. There is a part # for telescopic fork oil. P/N 31427652283 for 5000mL, and 31429062158 for 1000mL.
    I have not checked to see if these are good numbers with the local BMW shop yet.
    #13
  14. Pekkavee

    Pekkavee Been here awhile

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    Here is some advice how to do it.

    http://www.ukgser.com/forums/showthread.php?t=97873

    Pekka
    :eek1:eek1:eek1
    #14