08 KLR650 lowering link install

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by xhaleKLR, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. xhaleKLR

    xhaleKLR Adventurer

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    how difficult is it to install lowering links on an 08 klr 650? I would like to be able to fully place my feet flat on the ground and the extra 1.75 inches would definitely doo the trick. Also, would it void my warranty if I was to do this myself?
    #1
  2. Jkrup47

    Jkrup47 Adventurer

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    shouldn't be too difficult I installed raising links on my klr and it took about 30 minutes start to finish


    i wouldn't see why it would void your warranty..
    #2
  3. xhaleKLR

    xhaleKLR Adventurer

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    now that I have been reading more on this situation, I am unsure that I want to lower the bike, as I have read that it makes the suspensions too soft for touring when any luggage is added...even with the spring load tension all the way up at 5. Does anyone have any more information on this? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    #3
  4. Ragin Rabbi

    Ragin Rabbi Semper Fidelis

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    I don't know why it would soften the suspension up, though there are many more here that are better mechanics then I, and understand the mysterious goings on of bike suspension.
    #4
  5. dlh62c

    dlh62c Long timer

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    Lowering links do work...but that's just part of it.

    You will need to slide the forks up into the fork tree as well. If its too tall the bike will turn like a chopper....if too low it will turn like a shopping cart. The maker of the links should have instructions about how much to slide the forks.

    The side stand angle will be different as well. The rear wheel will be higher off the ground when up on the center stand. The distance between the seat and the pegs will be closer.

    I installed one on my 640. While I can almost flat foot the sucker...I got tired of dragging my knee across the seat each time I dismounted the thing.

    After two days I removed it. My legs were tucked a little closer than before and it felt uncomfortable. I had slid the forks up about 7/8"....but with the OEM links back on the bike, it just feels better where it is, so I haven't slid them back down. Now that I look back on it.....the bike always did feel like I was driving a chopper after I adjusted the preload.

    The COG also felt lower...the bike felt more stable on the highway those two days.

    daryl
    #5
  6. xhaleKLR

    xhaleKLR Adventurer

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    Thanks for the information dlh62c. Maybe I should just go for a lower seat instead. I will have to take everything you said into consideration.

    If anyone knows anything else about this, I could use all of the info that I can get my hands on.

    Thanks again.
    #6
  7. mikehailwood

    mikehailwood Been here awhile

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    I have lowered both the KLR's I have owned and it was good for me. It is true that the lower links soften the suspension. I weight 150 lbs and am 5'7" (going on 5'6"). I set the preload and damping both at "2" when riding locally. I set the preload to 5 and the damping to 4 when touring with panniers and topbox fully loaded for camping. This is all street riding (occasional gravel). If you weigh more and/or ride off-road, the lowering links might not work for you. In that case you might need to invest in the more expensive suspension upgrades. p.s. I also use the dished Corbin when riding locally.
    #7
  8. xhaleKLR

    xhaleKLR Adventurer

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    well...i do weigh a bit more at 195lbs, so this option probably wouldn't be the right thing for me. i was just trying to save the money compared to buying a new corbin seat. i guess i am just cheap, which is, from what i have picked up on this site, a normal klr owner trait. haha
    #8
  9. NewHampWoodsRider

    NewHampWoodsRider Tag Captor

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    Im in the same boat.

    Im going to a different/lower seat prior to changing the rear suspension geometry with lowering links.

    Riding buddy had them, took them out due to too much bottoming out.

    just my 2 cents...
    #9
  10. xhaleKLR

    xhaleKLR Adventurer

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    Thanks to everyone who responded so quickly. I really appreciate that advice and description of past experiences. Looks like I am going to have to pony up and order the corbin dished seat.
    #10
  11. Ranger Ron

    Ranger Ron Been here awhile

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    Lowering links won't change the distance between the seat and pegs. They will increase the leverage on the shock making it seem softer. You may not be able to set the preload for the correct amount of sag.

    You might consider lowering links and a stiffer spring. Check here: http://www.topgunmotorcycles.com/KLR_springs/klrsprings.html

    Ron
    #11
  12. dlh62c

    dlh62c Long timer

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    Anything that lowers the seat height....will decrease the distance between the seat and the pegs.

    daryl
    #12
  13. Ranger Ron

    Ranger Ron Been here awhile

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    Lowering links will lower the entire frame by raising the swing arm.

    Since the seat and foot pegs are both attached to the frame it will lower the seat and foot pegs together in relation to the ground, but not in relation to each other.

    The only way the seat/foot peg relationship would change with lowering links would be if the foot pegs were attached to the swing arm.

    Modifying or changing the seat would certainly change the seat/foot peg relationship, but the item in question here was lowering links.

    Ron
    #13
  14. dlh62c

    dlh62c Long timer

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    It may have started out about lowering links...but he's now thinking about modifying the seat. Removing padding from the seat or lowering the sub frame will decrease the distance between the seat and the pegs.

    daryl
    #14
  15. bouldergeek

    bouldergeek Filthy, poor KLR dweeb

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    Can is use this thread to get a few related points answered:

    i have a short female friend who is a good rider, and just got a 2000 KLR (she sold a SuperHawk 996 for it, and she's solid on a bike, just short).

    I want to add lowering links in addition to installing the stock Showa rear shock from my 2009.

    Qs:

    1. Are stock OEM shocks interchangeable between pre-'08 and post? I am hoping that the 2009's shock will be as lightly shorter throw and slightly stronger spring rate.

    2. Are the lowering links model-specific pre and post-'08? If I get links for an 08, for example, will they work on a 2000 model? Especially with an 08 shock.

    Any thoughts?
    #15
  16. ping

    ping Been here awhile

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    they sell lowering links at koubalink.com . You could also shave an inch off the seat.
    #16
  17. IslandStorm62

    IslandStorm62 n00b

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    Hi all, I'm new to the forum / ADVRider World. I am considering getting a KLR650 because of some of the reviews I've read. However, I have also read a bunch about lowering the bike for shorter riders.

    Options are:
    a) change the lowering link
    b) adjust the forks via the triple tree
    c) replace the shock with a shorter shock
    d) custom trim the seat.

    On the same note I've read that you shouldn't change the lowering link without lowering the forks.

    Bottom-line my inseam is about 28" of course that is standing straight up. So I need to bring the Seat height down from 35". My sportster seat height is 26", The seat is wide but I am able to have both feet flat.

    So, anyone out there have any experience with doing all of the above at the same time?
    #17