10 Common Motorcycle Accidents

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by PizzaHog, Aug 28, 2013.

  1. PizzaHog

    PizzaHog Thought Criminal

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    An excellent article, with fancy-pants multi-country videos:

    http://rideapart.com/2013/08/10-common-motorcycle-accidents-and-how-to-avoid-them/

    Excerpt:

    Riding a motorcycle is dangerous. Luckily, bikes also give you the best possible tools to avoid crashing — incredibly powerful brakes, obstruction-free vision, excellent handling and very gripy tires. Here’s how to use those tools, and your very own brain, to avoid an accident. ​
    Motorcycle Safety:
    Want to reduce your odds of dying in a crash? Get educated. New riders should complete a basic rider course from the MSF or similar while advanced tuition is available at race tracks. It can be cheaper than you fear.



    Safety gear doesn’t just help prevent injury in a crash, but can make riding more comfortable, put you in better control of your bike and help you be seen by other drivers. Bright colors on your helmet and jacket/suit will help car drivers see you, potentially avoiding some of the common accidents detailed below.

    Might be 205, but it bears repeating...


    PH
    #1
  2. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    True and I'd like to add another advantage.


    Mindset


    There's nothing more dangerous, to me, than hopping on a bike "nonchalantly", unfocused, in a hurry.

    You know what I mean, "I'm just going few blocks away", "It won't take long, I'm just going to buy a pack of cigarettes and I'm back anyway", "I don't have time to gear up", etc.

    By doing this, your mind is not properly set for riding and that's when accidents happen.


    By ATGATTing (or at least MOSTGATT), I tend to put myself in the right mindset for riding. It helps me to step back, put my mind to the task and be ready for the "battle". I guess it's like a goaltender putting is gear or a knight his armor or something.



    Be careful to not switch to the dark side where the gear makes you feel indestructible though.
    #2
  3. 950trailrider

    950trailrider Adventurer

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    It's why why a lot of accidents happen close to home, people just jumping on the bike (or in the car for that matter) to run an errand, get some cigarettes etc. Not too worried about the proper gear (what could possibly happen, they're only going to be out for a few minutes). When going on longer trips people tend to prepare better, have the proper mindset, concentrate on the actual trip and, dress up properly.
    #3
  4. JDK111

    JDK111 Been here awhile

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    Excellent article ... except for one thing........#10
    The list seems to be in the order of importance, so it should be #1.
    #4
  5. C/1/509

    C/1/509 Why?

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    A reminder never hurts
    #5
  6. Red9

    Red9 Been here awhile

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    No...
    You might think that is why but it's simply because most of our trips are in the general vicinity of our homes...

    It would be pretty strange for most accidents to happen 1,000 miles away when you only go 1,000 miles away once a year. Of course then there would be threads here from all the do-gooders telling us how dangerous it is to take a vacation.:D
    #6
  7. Red9

    Red9 Been here awhile

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    WTF....

    Do you ever have any fun on a bike?
    #7
  8. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    Don't take it in an over serious way.

    I have fun, don't worry, and the "process" described here is subtile in real life. I only tried to image it by using hyperbolic description to create emphasis. Yeah, I'm this kind of guy who likes to put effort into his writting.
    #8
  9. Red9

    Red9 Been here awhile

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    lol forget about it...
    #9
  10. khager

    khager Long timer

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    Good article, I already knew most of this, but here is one little tidbit I haven't thought of,

    Since you’re already on the brakes and the bike’s weight is distributed forward, compressing the front suspension and increasing the size of the front tire’s contact patch, you can easily tighten your line by applying a little more brake or widen it by letting off. Doing so should help you avoid obstacles such as gravel.
    #10
  11. Vertical C

    Vertical C Long timer

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    :huh, braking the front widens the line not the other way round?

    Why use brakes to steer anyway that is the most stupidist thing I have read. You steer using handlebar input.
    #11
  12. Derbobs

    Derbobs Adventurer

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    article must be fake. see hint:

    #12
  13. DudeClone

    DudeClone Long timer

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    3rd vid in link is an lol :lol3

    poor bike
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  14. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    Yup. I was genuinely surprised/angry at a friend I was riding with and he had been inattentive and fucked up a bend and nearly crashed (it wouldn't have affected me, I was intentionally hanging back far enough). I asked him when we stopped, "What the hell happened in that corner?" He replied, "I was distracted: I was thinking about [his girlfriend] and the row we had the other night...". Up until that point it had never occurred to me that you would think about stuff like that whilst riding, much less allow it to cause you to ride poorly. Isn't the very reason we ride to allow us to stop thinking about all that crap?!
    #14
  15. gravityisnotmyfriend

    gravityisnotmyfriend Long timer

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    The "gravel on the road" video looked more like a locked up front wheel to me. You can see his brake light come on and stay on through the corner. Looks to me like he was coming in too hot and on the brakes. Grabbed a little too much and slid the front wheel.

    Interesting read, though.
    #15
  16. 390beretta

    390beretta Long timer

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    The one about leaving an escape route ie: stopping to the left or right side of a lane when at a stop light in case someone fails to stop behind you is one that I always do. However, I see so many riders who don't. They also put their bikes in neutral frequently while stopped, also negating their ability to maneuver. And very few watch their mirrors at a light. I'm never comfortable unless I have one or two vehicles who've stopped successfully behind me. Excellent article, however I have no idea what caused the 75 mph crash shown in the video. Anybody know?
    #16
  17. orangebear

    orangebear Long timer

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    I was told to put the bike in to neutral in case you get rear ended while stop at a my at a red light. On my advance riding class. As on some roads there will be pavement to your left and oncoming cars to your right so there will be no place to go.
    #17
  18. KX50002

    KX50002 NooB, my ass

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    I guess that pretty much answered your question HUH??

    :cromag
    #18
  19. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    Dunno where that's from. Dunno if they're using recent numbers, or still re-hashing 30+ year old (Los Angeles centric- read large urban area) Hurt Study findings. Here's some fresh data from somewhere else (Oregon):

    [​IMG]

    Single Vehicle- Motorcycle only. Hard to blame that on left-turning cars.

    MC vs. Auto- That's the rider hitting a car, through no fault of the car. Typically, rear-end collision or hit oncoming car while trying to pass another, or ran wide in turn and hit oncoming car. Or- to show that "left turning car" doesn't always mean what you think it means- they're passing a car that slowed down and started a left turn into a side road. Guess what- that's not the driver's fault.

    Auto vs. MC- OK, that one's their fault... but only about one in five.

    More than 3/4 of motorcycle fatalities are the rider's own damn fault.

    Alcohol is 33%-50% still. Slightly better than it used to be, but still a big problem.

    Another notion from the Hurt Report is that "weather is not a significant factor". Um. The study was done where again?

    Not to knock the Hurt Report, but it raised a lot of questions that still haven't been answered.
    #19
  20. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    Wasn't too hot. Did apex a LOT early. Saw gravel, panicked and grabbed brakes, which turned a scary slide into a painful memory. (I'd say "lesson", but that would imply he learned any of "look further ahead", "apex later" or "don't grab brakes on gravel")

    Looks like he just grabbed a handful. Weight transfer for maximum braking isn't instantaneous.
    #20