1973 LWB R75/5 found in a field. Yes I rescued it!

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by lancruza, Feb 20, 2011.

  1. lancruza

    lancruza On a Mission

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    King, NC
    I came across a LWB R75/5 sitting outside in a mud hole in the middle of a field. I was told that the bike ran fine when it was parked--10 years ago!! Here are a couple of pics of the bike when I got it home and then a few after a little elbow grease. Amazing what a little cleaning will do.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Now comes the fun part, trying to get her running. Get ready, cause here come the questions. I've been a sponge on the internet since I got the bike. This forum is a great wealth of info. I ordered a couple of carb rebuild kits from EUBMW. I've also got some stuff on order from Hans at Hucky's. The tank is solid but rusty. I used the sodium carbonate electrolysis method and it cleaned right up. The petcocks were shot. I've seen new petcocks with a right angle exit like this one:

    [​IMG]

    I've also seen the straight version. Any advantage, one over another? I plan on rebuilding the carbs and then start looking at the engine. Is there anything that I shold do before I spin her over? Well that's it so far. I appreciate any advice that I can get on getting this bike running.

    Thanks
    #1
  2. jbcaddy

    jbcaddy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,238
    Location:
    Oroville & Placerville, California U.S.of A.
    i think i would pull the plugs and get some penetrating oil in the cylinders to soak for a while before trying to turn it over. JB
    #2
  3. LasseNC

    LasseNC XSessive!

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,084
    Location:
    Denmark, Danimarka, Danmark, Dänemark
    The kickstart pedal also sits in a weird position, might want to check that out.
    #3
  4. The Raven

    The Raven Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,811
    Location:
    Off the map,
    Pretty damn good shape for a 10yr field bike in NC
    #4
  5. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,320
    Location:
    Jackson's Bottom Oregon
    Pull the spark plugs and with the trans in gear, pull the rear wheel through many many revolutions - several minutes at least. That will get oil flowing everywhere - engine, trans, final drive, and help prevent a dry startup.

    Also, disconnect the tach and voltmeter. Five years ago I got a low-mile /5 from the original owner (14,000 miles), and rode it the 1,000 miles home. On the way both gauges self destructed and now require totally rebuilding. If I'd known what I do now I'd have had them serviced - in which case they'd only have needed a clean and lube.

    The right-angle petcocks are the current (newest) style. They both work fine, but the straight-through ones are correct for your bike.

    Did the bike come with a title???
    #5
  6. Beater

    Beater The Bavarian Butcher

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,637
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA, USA
    Awesome. Good one you. The 74 I 'found' could not have been brought back (for a reasonable cost) ... This is really good of you to do! Rock on.


    :clap
    #6
  7. Fudmucker

    Fudmucker ex-lurker

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    268
    Location:
    Pretoria, South Africa
    Using angled petcocks means if you need to put the tank down somewhere, the tubes of the petcocks don't stick down - into the dirt, worktop, etc. and keep clean.

    The straight ones were useful to dealers in that there was only one part to stock. The angled ones are L and R specific.
    #7
  8. lancruza

    lancruza On a Mission

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    King, NC
    Thanks for the help. Yes, I did get a title. I also got the original seat. He had taken it off the bike and stored it. No rips or tares but it does need some cleaning up. I would love for this bike to be pristine, but it would cost me way too much in time and money to get it anywhere near that point. My main goal is to get it running and then see what else it will need to get it on the road. If that's practically possible. I've never worked on a shaft drive bike, so I don't even know where to begin there. Any ideas where I can get a shop manual for it? There has also been a little bit of hacking done to the wiring harness, so I'm sure I will have to straighten that out also. It's gonna be fun.
    #8
  9. lancruza

    lancruza On a Mission

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    King, NC
    Hey Beater, love the avatar!! Meme--meme.
    #9
  10. squiffynimrod

    squiffynimrod maximum shrinkage

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,607
    Location:
    Flatskatchewan
    Drop the pan and clean it before firing her up.
    #10
  11. McHaven

    McHaven Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    Rusk, TX
    Lucky bastard. Fine looking bike, especially in that red color. You don't see too many in red.
    #11
  12. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,320
    Location:
    Jackson's Bottom Oregon
    Manuals are easy to find - ebay, amazon, used book stores - just do a search. The two main ones are Haynes and Clymer.

    Get yourself an exhaust nut wrench ($20), remove the nuts and anti-seize them. If they don't want to come off with moderate force, try heating and penetrating oil many times over. If still no luck, even if they move a little but continue to resist, don't take the chance of buggering the threads. Just cut them off - new ones are much cheaper than having the head repaired!

    A little hacking on the wiring??? :lol3

    You know, I don't think I've ever gotten a used vehicle that didn't have at least a little buggered wiring. My 77RS that looked pristine, when I got it home, found out it needed a whole new harness! :rofl
    #12
  13. lancruza

    lancruza On a Mission

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    King, NC
    Ok, I went downstairs and tried turning the rear wheel with the bike in gear. The rear brakes are dragging pretty bad. So, when I get time, off comes the rear hub. Should I be looking for a factory BMW service manual instead of a Clymer or Haynes, or will a Clymer or Haynes be just as good. Oh yeah, Clymer or Haynes?
    #13
  14. Boxer Metal

    Boxer Metal Mad Scientist

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,589
    Location:
    Chico, California
    Congratulations. What a super find.
    #14
  15. lancruza

    lancruza On a Mission

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    King, NC
    WOW!! Such tremendous insight.
    #15
  16. Boxer Metal

    Boxer Metal Mad Scientist

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,589
    Location:
    Chico, California
    From Wirespokes "Get yourself an exhaust nut wrench ($20), remove the nuts and anti-seize them. If they don't want to come off with moderate force, try heating and penetrating oil many times over. If still no luck, even if they move a little but continue to resist, don't take the chance of buggering the threads. Just cut them off - new ones are much cheaper than having the head repaired!"

    If they don't budge at all take a hack saw blade or small cut off wheel and cut as far through as you can without getting to the threads on the head. Make two cuts. One at 12 o'clock and the other at 6 o'clock. Take a wide metal chisel on the cut and wack it with a hammer. This will crack the nut and relieve it from the threads on the head. I have done the 20 or 30 times all with success.
    #16
  17. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,735
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Get the Clymer, it covers all R bikes years 70-96 Very easy to find one. You must have good Karma....nice find.
    #17
  18. crazydrummerdude

    crazydrummerdude Wacky Bongo Boy

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,671
    Location:
    El Segundo, CA
    1) Why do people say that? Completely useless information for a barn (or field) find. Also, I've found that you usually need to add a couple decades to the claim.
    2) Did it come with carburetors? I hope so!
    #18
  19. lancruza

    lancruza On a Mission

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    80
    Location:
    King, NC
    Yes, it does have carbs. I had already taken the left one off when I took the pix. The only things missing, so far, are the tool tray, the stock horn, and the front hinge on the stock seat.
    #19
  20. Hawk Medicine

    Hawk Medicine Coyote's Brother

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,304
    Location:
    NOR CAL
    Good find!!

    Are you sure that the bike sat in a field for a decade? After ten years outside, I'd expect to see the headers rusted through and a lot more moisture damage then we're looking at but either way, thats a lucky find indeed.

    As far as petcocks go, I'd replace the ones you have with the straight type. Not only will they look right but you won't have that extra loop of gas line going to the carbs. I like to keep gas lines short and to the point and I've never had a problem with damaging the straight ones. YMMV...

    Before you spin the engine, squirt some light oil into the spark plug holes and turn the engine over by hand a few times. You can do that by taking off the front cover and using an allen wrench in the alt rotor or by putting the bike in gear and turning the rear wheel. I like using the allen wrench myself but ymmv.

    By the way... Don't try using that kick start lever. It looks like you might have a problem there and you don't want to make it worse!

    PS: I'll trade ya for the air-horn if it works!:D
    #20