1976 Bultaco Alpina M166

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by OneSurlyRider, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. OneSurlyRider

    OneSurlyRider n00b

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    I recently got this bike when I was home in Montana, I've started checking all the Bultaco websites I can find and so far I've found a good amount of information. What I haven't found as of yet is a good manual or Parts book. Also I was wondering what anyone thinks a bike like this should go for. My plan is to restore it and possibly but it on the market once its cherry and I had a little fun.

    Also does anyone know where I can get the original tail light and bracket? As you can see in the photo it came with some crappy plastic ones and I plan on putting the original metal fenders once I buy them offline.

    Attached Files:

    #1
  2. darmst6829

    darmst6829 Been here awhile

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    Thats a great rider. Unfortunatly a perfect late model Alpina is worth about what it sold for when it was new. Hopefully I am wrong. Do your own research.

    Dave
    #2
  3. OneSurlyRider

    OneSurlyRider n00b

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    #3
  4. blaine.hale

    blaine.hale Long timer

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    Unfortunately that's FAAAAR off. I bought one in a little worse condition than yours for $600.
    I could spend $1000 getting it perfect and maybe break even on selling it.
    They're fun bikes, don't think about what it's worth in a market. Think about what it's worth TO YOU.
    #4
  5. lamotovita

    lamotovita Ageing Adventurer

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    If you want to make money on it sell that rear sprocket to the metal recyclers! it should bring a pretty penny:D.
    #5
  6. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    a great bike, they were the most widely produced. hard to get more than 1000-1500 out of one. there are quite a few collectible buls, unfortunately the alpina is not one of them...


    kbb/nada guide means absolutely nothing in the vintage motorcycle market.
    #6
  7. OneSurlyRider

    OneSurlyRider n00b

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    I know! although it is pretty cool to be able to idle up step hills its totally negated by the fact that the fist two gears are worthless.

    Regardless of the bike not being worth much I'm still pretty stoked to clean it up. It was a fun ride and I'm looking forward to working on it. If anyone has any advise on fixing it up I'd welcome the opinions. I may have made the mistake in an earlier post and made it sound I'm just interested in flipping it for profit, I got the bike because I liked how it looked and thought it was cool and a would be a fun project for the winter.
    #7
  8. Sniper X

    Sniper X De Oppresso Liber

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    even though the Alpina was one of the most reliable bikes Bultaco ever built, it is also one that is the most UN-collectable so you can never make any real money on them. As well, they have to be in perfect condition to be worth more than a grand. I love them and would love to have one but they are one of the slowest Bultaco's,and one of the least desirable for collectors, now if it was a Metralla or a Frontera.......I still want a nice Alpina.
    #8
  9. Sniper X

    Sniper X De Oppresso Liber

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    Here's what the fenders and stuff should look like.

    [​IMG]
    #9
  10. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Been here awhile

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    The Alpina is a great trails bike, it's not a trial, (even if they look like a Sherpa T in first hand), nearly everything is a little bit different. From discplacement, frame geometry, suspension travel lenghts, ... .

    It's lika a Beta Alp nowadays.

    The Alpina was made because the US market requested a Sherpa T "woods", as the Sherpas where too uncomfortable and specialized for trails riding. So Bultaco invented the Alpina something in-between the Sherpa and the "older" Matador or "newer" Fronteras.

    Been a transformer between the worlds the Alpina haven't been in collecters view as Sniper-X already stated. The bike has it fans in Europe, where by the way prices for Alpina's has got up, (expecially for the military models), while Sherpa's of the same age / period M181/182 + M190/191 haven't changed in price remarkable.

    Alpina 250 military:
    [​IMG]

    Alpina 350 Military:
    [​IMG]

    To your rear sprocket, look at your front sprocket you may have a too big one mounted which resulted in the big rear one. It should be 12 teeth front and 45 teeth back, you can even switch to 11 front and 39 teeth back, if you want to go faster you can try a 13 teeth front too, (sprockets are available through Talon).

    I would also redo the seat.

    A reference for the M166 I sadly can't show up with, here is one for the later Alpina M212 - 213 but there where only optical changes made.

    http://www.mallorcamotorweb.com/manuales/archivos/Bultaco_Alpina_250-350_manual_de_despiece.PDF

    Replica parts are available in Spain the stores are even in the www, but getting in contact isn't very easy as I found out, electronical orders from outside spain might be ignored. You often have to call them up in Spanish then it works very well.

    A good ressource for Bultaco is www.bultacouk.com in UK, Dave Renham should help you out with spares, part-lists manuals, ...

    Maybe just a silly idea, but if you have some time and some money to spend why not do a rebuild/conversion to a military model, as I know it's not difficult to get a G3 in the US :evil.
    #10
  11. Sniper X

    Sniper X De Oppresso Liber

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    Actually, one of my Holy Grail bikes is a showroom 1974~76 Bultaco (Blue of course!) Alpina 350.
    #11
  12. Statdawg

    Statdawg Do U feel lucky ?

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    Hughes Bultaco is a great resource www.bultaco.com


    There are great bikes, but I don't think there is a big market / prices for them. Unless you fine a sucker like me who once lived in Spain in the early 1970's and rode a few when they were kings of the dirt bikes..

    :norton

    Best of luck and thinks for sharing.
    #12
  13. sourdough

    sourdough vintage rider

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    That is a huge rear sprocket compaired to the stock size. Is there still a Spanish Motorcycle Owners Group, S.M.O.G. It was a good parts source.
    [​IMG]
    #13