1977 Gl1000 exhaust valve adjusted all the way in, bent valve??

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Jh321, Aug 7, 2017.

  1. Jh321

    Jh321 Adventurer

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    I have myself confused on this one... I recently acquired a GL1000 that has been sitting for 10ish years. I noticed that the #2 cylinder (front left) wasn't blowing any air out the plug hole/showing compression. I went to adjust all of the valves today and the tappet gap for the exhaust valve for that cylinder was extremely wide (like 2mm). I went to adjust and to get the correct clearance the screw has to be adjusted all the way in so much so that it is passing the nut and some of the nut threads are showing. I am confused as to why this could be? The valve opens and closes clearly but must not be closing all the way hense why no compression. My only thought is a bent valve, but I would have thought that would have been a bit more obvious.

    Any tips or hints on this?

    P.S. I think this is the right spot for this. After all, it is oldish...
    #1
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  2. Big John Sny

    Big John Sny Long timer

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    definitely could be. I quick leak down will tell you for sure.
    #2
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  3. Scudman

    Scudman Been here awhile

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    Could be that the valve rusted in open position. Use WD40 and whack the valve with a mallet. It may close
    #3
  4. Overdog

    Overdog 'Burghherfer.....

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    Take off the intake elbow and have a peek.....
    #4
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  5. Jh321

    Jh321 Adventurer

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    Hmm that will hopefully give me a peak. Will that allow me to see through to the exhaust valve? Or just the intake valve only? If not then I imagine looking into the exhaust outlet with the header removed may show something
    #5
  6. corsair4360

    corsair4360 Been here awhile

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    IF the intake valve is open you may be able to see the exhaust valve status (should be closed when the intake is open) with a good flashlight. If you have a fiber optic examination setup, that would work better through the spark plug hole with the spark plug removed. Does not sound great to me, definitely worth investigating in detail.
    #6
  7. JCool

    JCool Long timer

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    Or it's got a worn down cam lobe.
    #7
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  8. Jh321

    Jh321 Adventurer

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    Update: I pulled the header and the intake manifold to take a peak. And after one turn it miraculously is within the normal range now. BUT the intake valves for both left cylinders (because I can view these from the top) leak on the compression stroke as seen by smallish bubbles forming around the valve from leftover PB blaster remnants. I might just pull the head and clean the valves as they look quite dirty/oily and clearly aren't sealing.

    Additionally, the bike does not even hint at firing with starter fluid. The timing is all correct. I would think that even with leaky valves it would hint at firing? Or is it pushing all the starter fluid back out where it is leaking?
    #8
  9. corsair4360

    corsair4360 Been here awhile

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    Before you do anything more I would run a compression check. If the valves are oily, and the compression is low, then sounds like a complete overhaul is in order. I would do that first, then decide if you want to tackle an overhaul or not, decision time.
    #9
  10. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic

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    Possibility of a timing belt jumped a tooth or more.
    #10
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  11. Jh321

    Jh321 Adventurer

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    I bought the bike purely because I wanted to have something fun to tinker on after work so this is not a negative. Just more fun! I know that the compression is going to be low. The kickstart is easy to roll through with the hand even but has been improving the more that I play with the valves. I'll be digging into it so I will pull that head and see what happens.

    The story on the bike is that the owner died ~20 years ago. The son couldn't ride so it just sat. Then he changed the timing belt about 10 years ago to try to get it started. It didn't start. And sat since. In amazingly good shape though. No rust.
    #11
  12. Scudman

    Scudman Been here awhile

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    before you do something crazy like taking the engine apart squirt some WD40 into the intakes and whack the valves with a mallet. This will slam the valves into the seat and crush the corrosion. Hopefully enough so that the bike will start. Once it starts then the valves will seat fully and normal operation will resume. Compression check is a waste of time now as the valves are not seated due to possible rust.
    #12
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  13. The Ice Man

    The Ice Man Can't Thaw Out

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    That sounds fishy right there. You sure those timing belts are on right? Maybe he spun the engine over with one cam out of time, tweaked a valve or two and then corrected his mistake - but too late.

    I saw a GL1000 motor whose owner had decided it needed new belts.... he changed 'em, and now it is being used as a doorstop, because it has a great big hole in the top of a piston.

    (And you are probably going to spend fifty or sixty bucks for ONE head gasket, in case you weren't aware.)
    #13
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  14. Jh321

    Jh321 Adventurer

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    Well I went for it and removed both heads. Three of the four cylinders were leaking out of the intake valve seat (probably the exhaust too). so I figured something had to be done (but maybe I should have hammered the valves first to seat them). Both heads/valves are pretty coated in oily carbon and the pistons are coated as well. I am not alarmed because all of the pistons look the same. But they sure don't look clean.
    #14
  15. Scudman

    Scudman Been here awhile

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    I like to do the easy things first. Once that fails then I start on the harder tasks. Working on crusty projects have taught me a few things.
    #15
  16. Big John Sny

    Big John Sny Long timer

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    clean would be worse than carbon-ed up. If it is clean then there is oil washing the parts. any oil up there is a bad thing. I remember pulling the heads on an old Porsche, thinking it had to be valves leaking because the compression was so equally low on all cylinders only to find all of the pistons almost completely clean except for the size of a quarter on top of the piston. The oil control rings were completely shot.
    #16
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  17. bodine003

    bodine003 Been here awhile

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    Better check the cam belt is timed correct. agree with Ice Man
    #17
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