2 stroke fun for 200 bucks

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by hardwaregrrl, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    Yeah, I'm very frustrated. I haven't taken many forks apart, but I never thought I would be pulling my hair out with these little guys. I keep concocting plans, running downstairs and trying them out only to be screaming 5 mins. later. I actually tried a thing wooden dowel against the damper rod, but it was too thick. Anything thinner is most certainly going to snap when putting pressure on it. Put it this way, a 1/4" iron pipe is too large.
    #81
  2. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    explain this a bit more as it is my next option. are the springs installed? do I have to fill up the leg with oil? do they really just shoot out of the stanchion and on to the fork tube?? I'm trying it tomorrow. Don't have a scissor jack. have to borrow one.
    #82
  3. norton73

    norton73 drinkin'

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    Ok, tomorrow, try this,

    I'm assuming you've got the tube out of the triple clamp.

    remove the spring, dump a bunch of kroil, WD40 what ever in the upright fork.

    Reassmble the fork, compress the spring with spacers as much as possible, stuff some pvc pipe in there, etc

    apply some heat to the bottom of the slider. I'm liking heat guns lately, not too much to burn stuff

    hold some ice against the bolt, then use an impact to unscrew.
    #83
  4. norton73

    norton73 drinkin'

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    :rofl

    Someone, and I can't remember his username, too many beers this evening, posted a thread about doing this on his GPZ Kwaker.

    Hell, I've ridden with him a couple times, lives up near Ashville, musta killed that brain cell
    #84
  5. Motoduc1

    Motoduc1 backtrackvideo.com

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    Yes, you must fill the forks with oil. Springs out!

    Use a handyman jack or be safe and take it to a machine shop and have them compress them for you. Plus, all of the oil that spews out will be their problem to clean up.

    Again, make sure the springs are out. If it slips from the jack, a compressed fork would go through the roof!
    #85
  6. Andy-Gadget

    Andy-Gadget Any bike can go anywere

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    Have you access to a pneumatic spanner, (windy spanner, rattle gun) then this is your fix.

    Just did this three days ago on an R65LS, one bolt undid, the other spun the damper rod, allan key socket on bolt in rattle gun, and the inertia of the damper rod allows the bolt to be removed.

    I needed to use the windy spanner to do it up again as well, for the same reason, but this meant that I only needed to access the top of the fork to refill it with fork oil.
    #86
  7. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

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    It has been quite a few years, but as I remember the damper rods were hollow, with a "funnel" like taper at the top. I was always able to spin them loose with a pneumatic wrench, but if that didn't work for you, I would try a long screwdriver, or steel rod with a flat ground on the end to wedge into the center of the rod, after you verify the hollow taper of course.

    A lot of seals have a steel ring near the outer circumference of the seal to add rigidity and many times the ring has a lip, you might try to drive the screwdriver at an angle to the outer circumference of the seal then pry with a twisting motion, the combination will many times walk the seal out like a tire machine removes a tire.

    As for the nicks, careful work with a stone first to remove the high spots, then some very fine wet sandpaper (1500 grit) should do it. If the nicks are deep, Devcon makes specialty metal filled epoxies for this type of repair. I have some if you should need a little, pm me and I can send enough for a small repair.
    #87
  8. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    Hey all!! Thanks so much for all the advice. This thing is making me feel like a dipshit, wondering if I should just move on for now. No. I'm determined. Cleaning up the oil after blowing the seals out doesn't seem like much fun, so I'll leave that as a last resort. I think I'm going to run to home depot and buy a few small dowels and see if I can round the end down enough to jam it in the top of the damper rod. Gave up at about 1am this morning. Gong to look at a job and then I'll attack it.

    Andy gadget, I have been using the air wrench, a lot to no avail. Thanks all!!!

    And when you guys are talking about taking a "stone" to the nicks, are you reffering to a wet stone? Can I use the one for my knives??
    #88
  9. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

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    Yes as long as it is flat. A stone will take off the high spots and not damage the surrounding area if used carefully. Sand paper will take off the high spot, but also material from the surrounding area if it is backed by a resilient material, such as your hand, or even a block of wood.
    #89
  10. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    I would get a stock air filter and give it the PJ1 treatment. I cant believe they are expensive.

    Edit: Oh god, I'm so behind. disregard.
    #90
  11. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    Well, I bought some dowels today, tapered them. Jammed them into the damper rod, I believe, and it most certainly held it, but still it won't release. I had to walk away. Currently, they are soaking in wd40.


    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5459445573/" title="P1050007 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5132/5459445573_8ce63baf93.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050007" /></a>

    So back to cleaning. Took the front sprocket off...

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5459447229/" title="P1050011 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5100/5459447229_d24f67cb6d.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050011" /></a>

    To clean the seal, and the shift seal. They both look much better.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5460057020/" title="P1050013 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5012/5460057020_c01d139229.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050013" /></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5459466639/" title="P1050014 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5215/5459466639_8f9c91a396.jpg" width="333" height="500" alt="P1050014" /></a>

    Decided to blow out the oil lines and hit them with some silicone. Much more flexible now.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5460057896/" title="P1050015 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5260/5460057896_59498efc01.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050015" /></a>

    More cleaning....bottom end.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5460059958/" title="P1050016 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5016/5460059958_f239290880.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050016" /></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5460064386/" title="P1050018 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5053/5460064386_8d8b293bfe.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050018" /></a>

    much better....

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5459468117/" title="P1050026 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5211/5459468117_2d0cac1f88.jpg" width="333" height="500" alt="P1050026" /></a>

    Cleaned all electrical connections, and greased.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5460072020/" title="P1050032 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5292/5460072020_c9ea301544.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050032" /></a>

    Check this awesome connection for the tail/break light.

    <<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5459460213/" title="P1050027 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5291/5459460213_d01563057c.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050027" /></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22817219@N04/5459462023/" title="P1050028 by hardwaregrrl, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5052/5459462023_086f4c7640.jpg" width="500" height="333" alt="P1050028" /></a>

    Got the horn sounding better. Turn signals and neutral switch working. Tail light, but no brake light. Filaments look good and switch tested good, wondering if not having a socket is messing with the ground. I know I'm getting a head of myself, but felt like being productive.

    Not going to fight with the forks until someone can come over and help and attest to the fact that I am not a dumb shit....as I know I'm crazy.
    #91
  12. bluebye

    bluebye Skin it back

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    All the cleaning looks good, hope you get some help with the forks soon. Are you going to split the cases and install new bearings and seals? You might consider it,
    [​IMG]
    as all the debris ( aluminum, dirt, gasket material) will damage the bearings in a big hurry. And wash right up to the new top end. Cleanliness is next to Dogliness applies to the inside of a motor at all times for long life and performance. Good luck, and keep posting your progress. Chris.
    #92
  13. Beater

    Beater The Bavarian Butcher

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    Jenna - Got 2 gallons of the lemon oil ... Come by and grab some.
    #93
  14. PFFOG

    PFFOG Richard Alps-aholic

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    front sprocket is shot!
    #94
  15. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    Got it. New sprockets and chain are next. I tried to keep debris out of the bottom end. Guess I should drain it again? Planning to not split cases but replace the left seal as it seems to be able to replaced without splitting.
    #95
  16. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    Ok. So how difficult is it to split cases? I'm think about racing this bike in isdt or vintage cc. I feel like I should just do it. So what am I in for and what kind of tools will I need? Thx
    #96
  17. bluebye

    bluebye Skin it back

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    At this point I would turn the motor upside down on run clean parts washer fluid into the bottom end liberaly. The substitute would be mass quanities of spray brake clean. Try not to turn the crank at this point, its not good for the bearings. Air pressure helps to wash it out too. After you are thru, use a squirt can or any kind of spray oil and hit the bearings good (mains and rod). WD40 after that to keep the rust down. Good luck, Chris.
    #97
  18. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    Now you definitely have my attention. :d
    #98
  19. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

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    As far as the damper rod holding tool: I was messing with a '76 RM370 a while back and also had a bitch of a time with the forks. I was able to order the proper special socket for like 5 bucks new from Suzuki. See service bulletin "Tools-8" for part number. You don't need the T handle, just the attachment and a long 3/8" drive extension.
    http://www.ozebook.com/compendium/techbuls/SerBulletin Tools 7-10.pdf


    All bulletins here
    http://www.ozebook.com/compendium/techbuls/index.htm

    I had a HELL of a time getting the old seals out too. Had to have a buddy with a good slide hammer help me out.

    After all that work, I found out the forks were bent:cry

    There are some helpful guys on this Yahoo group too
    http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/tmsuzuki/
    #99
  20. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    cleaning the outside of those seals does stop potential dirt migration. but you're right there, just replace them. they can't be $10 for both of them....