2003 bmw f650gs leakdown test/headgasket/overheating

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Notnewchevy, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. Notnewchevy

    Notnewchevy Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
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    My buddy is having issues with overheating. We have tried lots of things and now he is at the end. Replaced the waterpump (all parts). He tried to replace the thermostat but ended up breaking the radiator :shog. $425.oo boo boo. Has coolant in the oil after two oil changes since replacing the waterpump seals. Is this a headgasket???? Can I do leak downtest to determine if it is the Headgasket??? does anyone have a leakdown tester I could borrow??? Any and all responces might save a rider from jumping off.
    #1
  2. CycleDoc59

    CycleDoc59 Wrench Rider

    Joined:
    May 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    984
    Location:
    East Virginia
    You don't mention coolant in the oil before the
    seal change...(?) Perhaps the new pump seals were
    damaged on installation.

    I'm guessing here, but many overheating problems are
    due to problems with the radiator cap (assuming that the
    cooling system is clean). Note that there
    are 2 gaskets on the cap. The smaller gasket seals against
    the inner rad flange, it and the flange must be in perfect
    shape and very clean.

    If the head gasket were leaking you'd expect to find oil
    in the coolant (oily skim at rad cap) since cylinder pressure
    is much greater than coolant pressure...

    A leak down test may show a bad head gasket (bubbles in
    the coolant), but maybe not if it is a high-pressure leak, plus
    the gasket may not leak till the engine is quite hot.
    #2
  3. Notnewchevy

    Notnewchevy Adventurer

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    thanks for reply Doc
    so the oil was contaminated before seal change (weep hole was not leaking) changed seals hoping that would fix overeheating it did not. There is still coolant in oil. could that be left over from before the seal change. The oil was changed twice since seals. less than 15 miles total. It is not as bad it just looks kind of milky.
    Rad cap is new. That was an easy place for us to start.

    If it was the headgasket maybe I should have coolant in the exhaust. Of course I don't. I have also thought of the only when hot thing, might be hard to to figure that one out. :(:cry:cry:cry in my beer. After reading my preview and reading what you wrote and what others have said this is turning into a real head shaker. I wish there was more than one bmw shop around. They have no time for anyone that doesn't have more money than Bill gates. We could take it there but my buddy has burned that bridge last year when trying to get some decent service. Lost his cool.
    #3
  4. CycleDoc59

    CycleDoc59 Wrench Rider

    Joined:
    May 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    984
    Location:
    East Virginia
    Sorry you are not near by. I get quite a bit of business from
    BMW owners because of enormous dealer rates and long waits..

    This may provide some cheer: I've serviced an '06 650 for all
    of it's current 115,000 miles, with no engine work...yet.
    #4
  5. Rutabaga

    Rutabaga Been here awhile

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    I certainly am not a BMW mechanic, but of course I have an opinion:rofl And my shop rate is zero. I try to do a logical troubleshooting method so as not to jump ahead and over the problem, this is based on my 50 something year record of creative mistakes. If you still are seeing traces of oil in the coolant then I would try a "coolant flush" with a very, very mild solution of something that would act as a detergent mixed with water. Two birds can be killed with this one stone. First, you can rid the cooling system of any traces do leftover oil. Secondly, by getting a voltmeter with the temperature measuring probe($20 at hardware store) you can measure the water temp exiting the head and the time involved for it to reach that temp. Seems like 180-190 degrees gets the fan going and takes about ten minutes +|- at idle. If the coolant temp rises at a great rate and short time frame then you may have a head gasket leak. May. At least you will have a little more data and a nice voltmeter with out a trip to some shop. You mention you have run it for about 15 minutes. How does it run? Leaking cylinders, especially when there is just one, tend to be missing a pony or two and that hot gas is gonna have to escape somewhere that is along the path of least resistence. If it is not overheating or out of the normal coolant temp range and not consuming coolant but runs OK, then I vote for a bad seal. Just remember my opinion is based on my mistakes and this could be another!
    #5
  6. Notnewchevy

    Notnewchevy Adventurer

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    hey Rutabaga (like the name) I'll have to try and check those temps also figure out how awful it has or hasn't been running. I am kind of at a loss with this ting. Taking care of kids and living life has got my time to work on the bikes down to almost nothing. Thanks for the cheap shop rate
    #6
  7. larryboy

    larryboy Chopper Rider

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    I like to start with pressure testing the cooling system. It's pretty easy, pump the system up to 20 lbs, drink a couple of beers, watch the pressure gauge...if it falls you start looking for where it went...pull the spark plug and crank it, if you get a mist and are able to smell the coolant...head gasket, if the crank case level came up you can look at the water pump seals again.

    You'll probably need this adapter:

    http://www.mechanicstoolsupply.com/Universal-Cooling-System-Pressure-Tester-Adapter_p_18993.html


    Pretty much the cheapest way to get into a pressure tester:

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CGAQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.harborfreight.com%2Fradiator-pressure-tester-kit-69258.html&ei=ov_WUcfdCqjfiALdyoGgCQ&usg=AFQjCNFEFhMYMmQEtkMWZImOoefaIfbPkg&sig2=yQard5T2Moi54TcIrZ9tFg


    Every garage should have one. :deal


    Edit; I never run a vehicle that has overheated...always find the problem first, especially an expensive to rebuild motorcycle engine.
    #7
  8. Notnewchevy

    Notnewchevy Adventurer

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    Hey Larryboy Thanks for the tip on the adapter. Hooking up the cooling system pressure tester was the first thing I tried and of course it didn't fit. Ordered the adapter and will give try it out as soon as it arrives. Thanks again fort the tips.
    #8