2013 Honda CB1100

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by DOUBLE-O G, Aug 24, 2012.

  1. Eddy Alvarez

    Eddy Alvarez Long timer

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    $600+ for a service on this bike is total BS! (Yes, I am still pissed that is doesn't have hydraulic valves like the 90's CB750 Nighthawk, LOL!) I save as much money as possible by doing my own basic servicing. For the harder stuff of things that require fancier tools, I go to my local mechanic (ADV:Guy Young) who I trust and he charges less than half of what the dealer charges.
    As far as miles go, I put 12,000 miles on my BMW GS last year and about 1,000 HARD miles on my DRZ400.

    Expensive servicing is the reason I unloaded my Ducati Monster. Even though my GS was expensive, I can do 85% of all required maintenance at home in my garage. Guy takes care of the of the 15%.
  2. Starkmojo

    Starkmojo Chief Totberry

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    I have never gone to a dealer for service... But the again I have never bought a bike from one either. :lol3
  3. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    Darn good advice, sir. :deal
  4. Dave in Wi

    Dave in Wi Long timer

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    I may have missed this, if so my bad. Do the cams need to come out to swap shims? I assume it doesn't have VVT so that shouldn't add a complication.
  5. RedRocket

    RedRocket Yeah! I want Cheesy Poofs

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    No vtec on the CB. I had a vtec VFR and a valve check was $400.
    I had it done once at 36,000, and based on the other ones he had opened up he felt 30k+ was really fine for an interval. Knowing honda quality I wouldn't worry myself about it.
  6. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Discussion about this earlier in the thread. I think the conclusion was that it was standard shim-under-bucket (cam removal required to swap shims) at 8K-mile check intervals.

    - Mark
  7. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I thought many Honda's (and other Japannese bikes) almost never need an actual adjustment of the valves when its done with shims.

    I read one story that some suzuki was never even checked for 40,000 miles and ran fine.

    Seems like it would not be too hard to check them.
  8. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    No one really has any hard data on how many bikes need adjustment and how many don't. And data from any single bike is too anecdotal to draw any conclusions.

    My data (I'd guess I've checked 50 or so bikes over the years) is that about 1/3 of the shim-adjusted bikes I've checked have required some adjustment. IMO, the idea that valves "almost never need adjustment" is wishful thinking, but by the same token, the risk of failure or accelerated wear if you want to let it slide is probably not great.

    Another confounding factor is that dealer mechanics will often look the other way if one is "close enough", especially if they don't charge more if adjustment is required. (There is another thread on this on this forum.)

    Lacking better hard data, I think following the mfg's recommendation is the best course, especially early in a bike's life before wear trends are established. But I certainly don't lose any sleep if, for whatever reason, I let it go longer now and then.

    - Mark
  9. Eddy Alvarez

    Eddy Alvarez Long timer

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    Only if you get paid every week, better save $30 per paycheck using this method. :lol2
  10. Cruisin'Carolina

    Cruisin'Carolina Been here awhile

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    Awesome report.. My first post in this thread. I've been eyeing this one long before it was announced it was coming....I just sold my starter TU250x.........having.a.hard.time.not.going.to.the.dealer.right.now. ;)
  11. Cruisin'Carolina

    Cruisin'Carolina Been here awhile

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    I share the same concerns...i.e., the size of the bike. I started on a '09 Suzuki TU250X just because I only like standards, and while it felt OK most of the time at 6'0" and 185 I looked liked a circus bear riding a trike in a circus. I have a 33" inseam, love the looks of this bike, just don't want to be oversized for it............
  12. omnivore

    omnivore SuperSportTourer

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    This is simply the best looking luggage design available for the CB as far as I am concerned. Looks period correct with the bike's retro styling.

    [​IMG]
  13. dirtdreamer50

    dirtdreamer50 long time rider

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    [​IMG]

    I, like others, waited for the CB to become available. It is a beautiful bike with a great history. Just wasn't ready to part with the bucks for it. Now Yamaha has come out with this naked Street Triple attacker, that has pulled me away from the CB...

    FZ-09 or MT-09 in Europe. 850cc triple, 115HP, 65 ft lbs of torque, upright seating with more leg room, and sells for $7990 USD. I've decided that if I'm going to ride a naked bike, may as well get one that really gets my attention.

    Guess I'm not ready to go retro just yet. Yes, some of the parts of the FZ look hokey, like the fake air inlets, but overall, I like it. Still may add a CB, down the road, but the FZ will probably be mine sooner.
  14. Cruisin'Carolina

    Cruisin'Carolina Been here awhile

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    OK...I must stop buy the dealer in CLT this week I guess. I like standards, have my starter bike up for sale...

    (TU250x)

    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=893043

    But looking at the specs the CB sounds REALLY small. I've read the thread, some think it is, some think it isn't.

    I don't think any standard is going to be big, but only 5" longer wheelbase?

    I'm 6' with a 33-34 inseam.
  15. jas67

    jas67 Been here awhile

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    at the motorcycle breakfast in Ephrata, PA, along side a real nice SOHC CB750:
    [​IMG]

    Oh, and I saw this CBX there too (I know it is isn't a CB1100, but so sexy!):
    [​IMG]
  16. TINK

    TINK Been here awhile

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    Anyone that owns a CB1100 thought about changing the gearing on their bike?
    [FONT=‚l‚r –¾f©]
    The CB1100 is geared to short, IMHO. When I looked at the rear sprocket it did not appear to have enough meat left the put on a smaller rear sprocket.

    Does anyone know if there is room for a larger 19T (18T is stock) front sprocket?

    TINK
    [/FONT]
  17. Starkmojo

    Starkmojo Chief Totberry

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    Some dumbass resprocketed my TDM and while it did make getting mileage awards from the popo a snap it made any kind of urban driving a bitch. Engineers put a lot of thought into those kind of trade offs, tread carefully when you start second guessing them.

    Sent from my HTCEVOV4G using Tapatalk 2
  18. dirtdreamer50

    dirtdreamer50 long time rider

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    I've owned only two street bikes that actually needed regearing, a Triumph T100 and a KLR650. Went up one tooth on the C/S. That is the norm for most owners of both models. It brought the info below into order.

    Generally, if 60 mph is around half way to red line, you're good. Best to stay in the torque range of the engine for best performance. Just check your tach and speedo, and if in the middle at 60, should be good. Like was said, Honda engineers are the best, but if the original gearing was designed for roads in Japan, and unchanged for USA models, one tooth may be good for our 75/80 mph highways here in Texas. Just need to decide what will make the CB perform in your area. tomp
  19. Gas Hog

    Gas Hog Two Wheel Fanatic

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    Yea I have said this before, might be the only thing I want to change. No need for that many revs @60ish.
    But talk is as far as I've got with that so far..
    Gary
  20. Gypped

    Gypped Backyard Camper

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    In 5th gear, 80 mph is what, 4500 or thereabouts? Considering redline is 8500, I don't think that's particularly crazy. Now, I feel 1st gear is awfully short since it's almost redlined at 50 but that really only affects the 0-60 number I suppose...

    Also, for the torque curve on the CB, there isn't much actual curve to it. It's just about as flat as it gets.