2013 Honda CB1100

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by DOUBLE-O G, Aug 24, 2012.

  1. dpg

    dpg Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    St. Louis, Mo.
    I too think the above rendition is too old school. I like the looks of the newly offered bike better. The cool thing is I feel this bike lends itself so easily to modifications and personalizing it. Something that I think is more difficult on SS bike, adventure bikes and luxobarges. Cruisers may lend themselves to individulization and I think that is part of the attraction to Harleys however not everyone wants forward controls. Painting the tank, side covers, changing handlebars, seats, cowling, lighting, engine color, luggage options (leather/hardcase) seems like it gives you more options to individualize your bike than any other type of bike. The Guzzi v7 is a good example. I know you can change any type of bike however the standard templete just seems the ideal bike to start with imho.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  2. Guth

    Guth Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    149
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    For my way of thinking, this sums things up nicely from the standpoint of style. I don't share in the criticisms voiced here about the looks of the CB1100 along with it not being retro enough. To me the bike simply stands on its own with a healthy nod to Honda's past, yet still a unique bike in it's own right. That's not to say that I think the CB1100 is absolutely perfect, but I too prefer the style of the CB1100 over what would amount to a reproduction of the CB750. If I really wanted a bike that looked like a CB750, then I'd buy an original. Obviously, others feel just the opposite and that's okay. We all like what we like.
  3. dpg

    dpg Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    St. Louis, Mo.
    I wonder why there isn't more on the internet from people who actually own the cb1100 in Australia. There is no forum that I can find and nothing to report about it. I am curious why it does not seem to be a hit there. Many blokes chimed in over at cbr250.net about their weebee R's. If anyone finds any banter from down under, please share. :ear
  4. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,386
    Location:
    Central CT
    If you-all got as interested as I did by this pic, here's the Ebay info ($280 - ended in October 2011, vendor seems inactive):
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Honda-CB750...048?forcev4exp=true&item=270788875048&vxp=mtr

    Also, don't go to the classicscycle website - it'll try to slip a Trojan on you (virus, that is) and it's "under construction".
  5. The other Ferret

    The other Ferret Motorcycle nut

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    269
    Location:
    Southwest Ohio
    I wonder that myself. There are forums for every obscure bike there is except this one it seems, yet in bikepics there are lots of pics from owners with all kinds of modified CB 1100 s.
  6. Dave in Wi

    Dave in Wi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,061
    Location:
    Madison WI (40 Square Miles Surrounded By Reality)
    It's an old-school bike, maybe they are all faxing each other?
  7. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,665
    Location:
    Collingwood, Ontario
    I was just posting a photo of the look I'd want. The strap and the stitching are nice. Sorry if I led you on a wild-goose chase.
  8. The other Ferret

    The other Ferret Motorcycle nut

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    269
    Location:
    Southwest Ohio

    Now that's funny... and probably truer than many people realize. I still get emails, texts and messages confused. Sometimes I'm not sure how to contact somebody, especially my children, since they wont answer the dang phone.
  9. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,386
    Location:
    Central CT
    No need to apologize! It's good to know if practical items like that are available, and I'm always up for a good wild-goose chase!:lol3
  10. dpg

    dpg Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    St. Louis, Mo.
    :poser
  11. L.B.S.

    L.B.S. Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,502
    14.6 litre (3.85 gal) tank size?

    ...:huh Isn't that kinda small?
  12. The other Ferret

    The other Ferret Motorcycle nut

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    269
    Location:
    Southwest Ohio

    Yes unfortunately, however for most of us thats no reason to reject the whole bike.
  13. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    470
    Location:
    Englewood, CO
    Not to me. I've owned 9 motorcycles and AFAIK none of them had a bigger tank than about 3.9 gallons.

    I know big touring bikes and big dual-sports often have huge tanks in the 6-7 gallon range but just under 4 seems pretty reasonable for a street/road bike. Even at 40mpg 3.5 gallons will get you to 140 miles or two full hours of riding at 70mph (and that's if you're "slabbing" it - if you're in the twisties you're likely to be averaging less than 70.) Most bikes in this class are capable of at least 45mpg and possibly more (my 885 Thunderbird was good for about 49 most of the time) so while the range may not be in the same class as a Gold Wing or and ST1100 it should be perfectly adequate for most "regular" riders.

    And I don't know about you but I'm usually ready for a bit of a break after 140 miles or so. And even riding in our least populated state (Wyoming) I've never had a problem finding a gas station when I needed one (though it does take a bit more forethought than riding in more populated areas does - you learn very quickly not to pass up a gas station once you're over about 100 miles.)
  14. straightrod

    straightrod Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,315
    Location:
    SoCal
    ^ So what you are saying is that if you are slabbing in remote areas you probably will be stopping every 100 miles or at the closest station to avoid walking? I want the bike, and realize that to most everyone the tank size is not a concern; but good grief, out west riding means one has to be constantly on the lookout for a station.
  15. jitterymonkey

    jitterymonkey Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    406
    Location:
    Canton Ohio
    This is an A D V E N T U R E forum.

    There's a girl going alone from Virginia to Alaska on a 1986 Yamaha Radian with a 3.17 gallon tank.....
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=831213
  16. Starkmojo

    Starkmojo Chief Totberry

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    667
    Location:
    Where the valley rises up to the shifting mountain
    If you really need a bigger tank...


    [​IMG]
  17. Gas Hog

    Gas Hog Two Wheel Fanatic

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,108
    Location:
    Beachside on the sand
    On purpose?..Why, did she lose a bet..:jack
    If your idea of A D V E N T U R E is looking for a gas station..then you are covered.
    Not a fail, but it would have been sooo easy to add 1 stinkin gallon. Would have completely changed the way you do a trip.
    Gary
  18. The other Ferret

    The other Ferret Motorcycle nut

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    269
    Location:
    Southwest Ohio
  19. Gham

    Gham Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,452
    Location:
    Auburn Hills,MI.
    I understand your point but it's not "deals off"small.My CB has a 5 gal tank and if the mileage is roughly the same the CB1100 should be about 120+ to reserve and then another 38-42 miles to empty.While not great touring creds it's ok for light touring and about perfect for my commute(44 miles round trip).I never get too "gotta get there" to stop every couple hours though.Just my style,not picking an arguement if you do big miles.With no wind protection I'm going to be ready to stretch every couple hours anyway.Loaded down,2 up,against a headwind could get interesting though.
  20. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    470
    Location:
    Englewood, CO
    Well, I grew up in Colorado and have been riding out here for the past 30 years or so. I've never had a bike that had more than a 160 mile (safe) range (I've gotten some of my bikes up to 175 miles before hitting reserve but I knew it was a fluke) and it has simply never been an issue for me. Most of my bikes would go 125 - 150 miles before hitting reserve.

    If you are on paved roads, there actually aren't very many places in the Lower 48 where you can go more than 100 miles without hitting a gas station. Even in wide open, empty places like Wyoming and Nevada, there are gas stations at least every 70 - 100 miles on every paved road I can think of. And of course if you're on the interstate, they are even closer than that.

    Here's just one example: I-80 between Rawlins and Rock Springs. This is a 100 miles stretch with no towns of any significance. And yet, there are at least two gas stations I'm aware of, one about 25 miles West of Rawlins, and another one about 20 - 30 miles past that. As long as you're not riding a Sportster with a "peanut" tank, fuel just isn't a concern as long as you stay aware of your miles.

    Unless you're the type of person who doesn't even start looking for a gas station until you hit reserve, you'd have no problems with a 140 - 160 mile range (which I'm assuming the CB has.) In fact, I don't know about you but at the age of 51, I'm usually ready to get off the bike and stretch my legs and get a cup of coffee or a cold drink every 100 miles or so.

    I'm sure somewhere out on the wide expanse of the internet somebody has figured out where the longest stretch of paved road without a gas station is but I'll bet it's not 100 miles unless you deliberately route yourself away from fuel. :ear