2014 1190 US Powerparts Skid plate mounting solution

Discussion in 'Ridiculous streetbikes with 6 CPUs and too much HP' started by vasculopath, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Jerkus Maximus

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    That doesn't sound like a good idea. If you're bashing the bottom hard enough to warrant the skid plate, the three legged mount is gonna mess it up.
    If it's a Starbucks Mod...then on ya go.
    #21
  2. Vitruvian Mike

    Vitruvian Mike Been here awhile

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    The dealer didn't even know it when they were prepping mine, until I pointed it out. The tapped and bolted it free of charge, on the spot.

    I pointed it out to another dealer in Arkansas, and they were pretty surprised. He thanked me, and let me know he'd pass it on to the rest of their wrenches.

    Fairly easy to do, but BS if the dealer won't cover it.

    VM
    #22
  3. Barekat

    Barekat Looking to get dirty

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    Isn't the bash plate intended to protect the engine casing? ... and the factory bash plate mounts to the casing... That sound counter intuitive to me. :doh
    #23
  4. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    Sounds like a terrible idea to me.
    #24
  5. Vitruvian Mike

    Vitruvian Mike Been here awhile

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    Hey Barekat, lots of bikes have gone to frame systens that incorporate the engine as part of the structural design. Nearly all of these bikes use either some form of direct or indirect mount points to the engine case. Seemed counterintuitive to me a while back too.

    VM

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    #25
  6. dewaynehasty

    dewaynehasty Been here awhile

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    Hey does anyone recommend using thread lock on the skid plate bolts?
    #26
  7. dewaynehasty

    dewaynehasty Been here awhile

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    Yes do use thread lock. I lost one of the screws already :(
    #27
  8. Wonway

    Wonway KTM Fanboi #2

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    It gets mounted to the frame and the engine.
    #28
  9. red activist

    red activist n00b

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    I'm having trouble getting the nut out on the left side of the engine casing. Any tips? Did you heat it up to weaken the locktite or just used alot of force on it? I don't want to break the bolt but I also don't want to go back to the shop before it needs it's first servicing since it's not really close to my home...
    #29
  10. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    I just installed my KTM skid plate this evening. Tapping the hole was the easiest part. My front engine bolts came out fine, but I used a 3/8 drive Torx socket on a regular ratchet. The 2 issues I had, which made this whole deal take an extra hour:

    1. I started with the bike on the center stand, but the CS interfered with the left rear bracket. It wouldn't let the bracket swing forward far enough to line up the holes in the rear of the a skid plate (even though it's obviously shaped to clear the CS when it's up). Finally I put the bike on the side stand, the bracket lined right up, and now there is no inference with the center stand. I finished in the dark so I can't tell if there is any interference now, but the CS seems to be working right.

    2. When I pulled out the front engine bolts, I had trouble getting both skid plate / engine mount bolts in. It looked like the engine was dropping down just enough to make it hard to get one or the other bolts started. I used a bottle jack (carefully) to exert a little up pressure on the motor, but eventually put the original bolts back in to line it up again. I think I farted around with these two bolts for over an hour. Maybe my crash bars are a little "crooked" IDK?

    I did use Locktite, and I think I can mill the left side to allow removal of my oil screens with out taking the whole plate off at oil change time.
    #30
  11. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    You mean the front engine mount bolt? I used a regular ratchet and Torx socket, I doubt I could have gotten it with the ktm kit tools.
    #31
  12. Yellow Pig

    Yellow Pig Allergic to asphalt!

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    FYI: With the Power Parts skid plate make sure you use anti-seize on the small skid plate bolts. Aluminum skid plate w/ steel bolts will cause galvanic corrosion and freeze lock the bolts in place.
    #32
  13. red activist

    red activist n00b

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    Yeah a different ratchet did the job without any trouble! Thanks!
    #33
  14. NoSpam

    NoSpam Been here awhile

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    Kinda depends...
    This is some big-brain stuff, YellowPig! Nicely done and thank you! :thumb
    #34
  15. like2lean

    like2lean Adventurer

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    I couldn't find a 8.5 mm bit either, but the 21/64 is 8.35 mm and jiggles a bit so I ran the tap right in no problem at all. I'm purdy sure the hole must have been drilled already as the tap felt perfect.
    #35
  16. GAKTMerForLife

    GAKTMerForLife n00b

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    Dewayne
    #36
  17. GAKTMerForLife

    GAKTMerForLife n00b

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    De
    Dewayne, Thanks for the video. I like videos posted by guys who record their first attempt at a procedure. Those that have been performed many times are, of course, helpful. However, almost without exception they make the procedure appear far easier than it is, at least for me. A giveaway, and this word is also liberally used in every manual thus far written in the history of the universe, or at least the Milky Way Galaxy, is use of the word, "simply." If readers, if any, find a manual that doesn't use the word, "simply," please contact me immediately so that I can stop making a fool of myself with the extremity of my claim.

    The only suggestion I can offer is that you take the "first time" theme just a bit further. Instead of announcing the problem with the unthreaded hole in the first 20 seconds, IMO, it would have been more interesting - certainly funnier - if you had discovered it when you arrived at the point in the installation then you would have screwed the bolt into the hole. Something like this:

    “Next, the engineers at KTM, who I might add are universally brilliant men and women who have carefully thought through with meticulous care every detail of the design of this motorcycle, have already included in the engine casing - the strongest piece of metal on this flawless machine - a hole that allows the right skid plate bracket to be bolted on securely. I think it is important to note that this hole was not drilled as an afterthought, which almost certainly would be the way every other company would do it. Nope, KTM engineers think ahead. They created this critical hole as the same time they poured molten steel into the mold that created the engine block itself. Thus it is now a simple matter to take the bolt and the … the… What the F**K! Mutherf**ker s**t, the godd**ned hole isn’t threaded.”

    I'm late to the game for this problem because I purchased a (base model) 2014 1190 Adventure in February of this year, that is, 2016. I had looked at a 2015 a year or so ago, and absolutely lusted after it. However, it had an MSRP of, I believe, $16,499, plus freight, assembly, paperwork, extra dealer profit, Georgia state tax, and with a couple of modest accessories, I was looking at $20,000. Could I buy the bike at that price? Using smoke and mirrors, robbing Peter to pay Paul, and bending my finances into a pretzel, absolutely! No problem. The challenge was going to be how to remain married.

    A year goes by, during which I looked at a lot of less expensive bikes - e.g., a Yamaha FJ-09 appeared to provide a lot of motorcycle at a price I could afford, with just one minor problem. I didn't want an FJ-09. Then this past January I was browsing prices and saw that a dealership about a hundred miles away was advertising a new 2014 KTM 1190 Adventure for the lowest price in the country - $11,999. We all know that that price is completely irrelevant, and often a fantasy, or someone's bad idea of a joke. Only the lowest out-the-door price is relevant and that price can be a challenge to pin down, especially from a hundred miles away. In my experience, the absolutely best price is only available to a live human being sitting in the dealership with the money he is willing to pay, in hand - or alternatively, a substantial (at least 10%), non-refundable deposit, can also work.

    It's tacky to reveal the price of a motorcycle, but I'll just say that this dealership also had one unsold base 2015 1190, and had received the first of several 2016s, both base and 'R' models (which apparently sell more quickly), and they were highly motivated for "my" 2014 to be somewhere, anywhere, other than sitting on their floor. The good news is that I'm riding an incredible bike, the nicest, fastest, most capable I've ridden, let alone owned, in the 52 years since my parents bought me a Vespa 150. However, I'm also encountering the problems that were discussed two years ago.

    The comments about drilling into the engine block to the point reaching oil appear to be off-base. I took the bike to the shop I use. My personal KTM mechanic took about ten minutes to drill and tap the hole, and then removed the bolt on the other side, which too tight and awkwardly placed to be removed with the tools I had. You could see all the way through the engine block to the hole on the other side. Thus it seems unlikely that you had to be careful how deep you drilled since you could drill all the way through and not strike oil.

    I haven't finished installing the skid plate, but if I have an exciting adventure doing so will write, just in case there's a 2014 1190 somewhere needing help.
    #37
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  18. Barekat

    Barekat Looking to get dirty

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    Brother you like words ...
    #38
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  19. GAKTMerForLife

    GAKTMerForLife n00b

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    I'll try to be brief. No details. The OEM 1190 skid plate appears to be securely installed. A key factor in success was a six person team, using the term "team," extremely loosely. One marginally competent mechanic-foreman was at the middle of the bike, where the back of the skid plate attaches, and another was at the front. This allowed them to simultaneously adjust attachment points, because if the back was as much as a half-inch off, it would not attach properly in the front. The third foreman held the plate up under the bike, allowing the foreman in the front and the back to argue as they push and pulled, apparently only concerned with screwing in their six screws without concern for the need for both ends to fit flush against the attachment plates. (If the reader, if any, noticed that there were no workers present, only foreman, the reader would be correct).

    The other three person's present were two wives and girl friends - of someone - but not members of our team. They were walking by on the quiet residential street where the deed was done and one of the foreman invited, and subsequently persuaded, the passer's-by to sit in the shade and drink iced tea while the men performed challenging, "Man's Work," on the exceptionally attractive big orange motorcycle, the likes of which none of our new friends had ever seen.

    You older gentleman out there, and you know who you are, ever wish you weren't, oh, 67, in my case?
    **
    So why I am posting all this if the job is complete? I mean, besides because I'm fond of words.

    I am a bit concerned because there is some hardware left over, including two bushings. I have the OEM engine bars and hope to install them this weekend. It's a little late for this question, but should I have installed the bars first? But since the skid plate is on, are there any special challenges I should be aware of, caused by having the skid plate installed, or more broadly, problems such as, oh, for example, encountering unthreaded holes?

    See, Barekate. When I work at it, I can get right to the point.

    Thanks for your kind help.

    John
    #39
  20. Hikertrash

    Hikertrash Wasted Rock Ranger

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    You'll need the two bushings when you install the OEM crashbars. The front support will have to come off in order to install the crashbars. Then the front bracket mounts over their front mounting point and the spacers go between the crashbar and front mount. I had the written instructions I found online, but lost them and used the youtube video for instructions the 2nd time. I do remember the instructions specifying not to tighten anything till last. I left everything loose and then bolted up the plate and when that was on, tightened the brackets. It was an easy one man job.
    #40