2014 klr 650

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by n8dawg6, Dec 13, 2013.

  1. n8dawg6

    n8dawg6 krunkin'

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    Fellas, just got the email announcement that they are making some changes to the 2014 KLR 650:

    http://www.kawasaki.com/NPL/Default.aspx?cm_sp=NPL-_-KMCPromo-_-LeftRailPromo

    hope the link works. Anyway, stiffer suspension, and redesigned the seat. with the narrow seat, i might actually be able to swing a leg over and mount this one. about the most interested i've been in a new bike since i started riding 4 yrs ago.

    thoughts?
    #1
  2. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    nice improvements but really no big deal.

    sounds like they are just using stiffer spring rates and a different seat.
    doubt the suspension components are any different that just rates.
    they old rates were too soft anyway.
    i'm sure the same junk rear shock.

    save $ on a left over one or slightly used one and do that yourself.
    betting the seat cushion is still way too soft. most toss stock seats anyway and buy a corbin, sargent or seat concepts.

    buy a 10-13 and spend the savings on a Cogent or others rear shock. DDC valves & proper springs in the forks and a seat concept seat and you'll spend less and have a MUCH better bike.

    atleast they are trying, but these are improvements that are cheap to them and don't really modernize the bike. if Kawasaki wanted to really improve the bike then FI the motor and truly upgrade the suspension with USD up front and a quality shock in the rear. They could keep everything else the same (except for FI pump interface on the tank) charge $500-$1000 more and they'd sell like wildfire. If they did that it would require new EPA cert$. Of course they won't do a damn until they are backed into an EPA wall and can't sell what they make now any longer. Same thing with the DR650...keeping pumping em out as they can w/ EPA averaging across all models.
    #2
  3. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    Put the KLR on a diet to drop about 100 pounds and spend some time lifting to gain muscle-- about 30 hp. Oh, and fix the doo for real.

    That's when I'll buy another new.

    Meanwhile, as I'm looking for another bike, I'll be enjoying the KLR as it is. At the price point it's not bad.
    #3
  4. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    Whoa, shit just got real.
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  5. n8dawg6

    n8dawg6 krunkin'

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    honestly, im just hoping to be able to tiptoe and touch the ground whilst seated on one ...
    #5
  6. Outwardbound

    Outwardbound Been here awhile

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    Kawasaki is fond of 'parts bin' bikes. I CAN'T understand why they don't simply splice the Versys motor into the KLR frame. So many people have done it: it's not rocket science. The engine is smog-certified, the frame can handle the extra power, the bike has SUCH a following...... it's such an easy way to compete with the other twin dualsports in the marketplace. Don't tell me they couldn't bring it to the floor for less than $7k.... I won't believe it. They crank these engines out by the thousands in Thailand. You'd think the KHI engineers would see the possibilities. These guys are not stupid, yet they won't compete in the fastest growing niche of the marketplace. What am I missing ?
    #6
  7. Sig_Sour

    Sig_Sour Been here awhile

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    I don't think the KLR frame should try to handle a v-twin offroad. It has been done but I think if those custom builds were beaten on substantially offroad we'd see frame failures. No doubt the frame is strong but it's not square tubing or a trellis and the metal is pretty cheap like most of the metal on the KLR650 (speaking as a former owner). From what I remember of the custom KLR v-twin builds, frame modification was required to fit the transplant engines and that approach rarely yields a frame that is stronger than one made for the engine from scratch. I'd also think a more rigid swingarm would be in order to handle the power of a v-twin.

    Kawasaki will only change the KLR when it makes financial sense to them. They won't replace the KLR with a v-twin ADV/DS any time soon because the KLR as it stands today is a success and they don't want to fix what isn't broken. To discontinue the KLR650 thumper and replace it with something else (even if all they did was make it a v-twin) would be a substantial gamble.

    The KLR is the economy DS option and even to keep the single but to update it with FI, weight loss, and modern suspension would render it the economy DS option no longer, again tampering with success. That's why we see "new comfortable seat" as the headline for the new MY.

    Big Green changed the look of KLR650 from a overweight dual sport to a underpowered ADV bike over one single model year while all functional aspects of the bike remained essentially the same. It's a shame that all that plastic on the second generation is a waste unless you do most what the bike is worst at IMO and buzz away on high speed pavement (I've never understood wind protection outside of highway riding 65 MPH +). Either way the plastic is useless when you pack it up in your panniers after busting it all over the dirt. What's sad is the looks sell even though the corresponding functionality (the power of a true ADV bike) is not there. Don't get me wrong I'd love another KLR650 but it's more of a day ride dual sport to me when bikes like the Super Tenere can be had which are just as bulletproof and low maintenance. I think between the S10 and the WR250R, the KLR650 is obsolete as an old-tech Japanese dual sport. For the longest time nothing could really approach the KLR's reliability and low maintenance, but now Yamaha has showed us comparable reliability and maintenance is those two bikes which both overlap and expand on the KLR's abilities while maintaining the quality of function we expect from Japan. Either Yamaha can do the kind of riding most KLR owners end up doing (low tech dual sport riding=dirt roads), but the KLR can't handle the offroad the WR250R can or match the power and comfort on the street the S10 delivers.
    #7
  8. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Hell people have wondered from day 1 of the Versys why Kawi put that motor into an ADV/DS, especially after BMW released the 800GS. Inline twins are the rage these days for those kinda bikes. Yamaha is the only Japanese mfg really trying in that segment.
    #8
  9. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Your right the the KLR has a huge history and following to radically change it. No way it's ever going away. You're also right they will not change the bike until they have to, but I believe it will not be a financial decision but rather an out-side from them emissions decision. At some point they can not keep that carb engine in their line up with the number of bikes they sell and achieve the proper corporate average. They will be forced to FI it or drop it.

    There are realistically only a few more years (2-4 would be my guess) left before every bike is FI. The US will keep requiring cleaner and cleaner emission standards to the point that any carb bike left in the lineup will screw up the corporate average downwards; so it's either drop it or update it. Europe goes to Euro 4 in 2016 and Euro 5 in 2020. Don't expect the US EPA to just sit by. Likewise you can be guaranteed all the mfg as secretly developing new or updated motors behind closed doors so they are ready when need be. R&D is not an overnight thing, but rather many years out.

    I'd venture to say this is the final revision of the KLR in this form.

    The Versys motor engine bike would be a different model, not replace the KLR. It would compete with the Vstrom which is hardly new and seems to sell more than 1 a year so I think the segment is solid :rofl

    Kawi is not new by any means to building inline twin ADV bikes
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawasaki_KLE500
    so i don't get what their problem is with competing in the segment?

    The Weber's sure like the 500 twin...so imagine a 650 twin
    http://www.rallytwin.com/

    #9
  10. mxbundy

    mxbundy Long timer

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    Rallytwin?

    That is a promising looking bike.......Really!!:D
    I would be interested in one..........but $68,000, the guy is on crack!
    #10
  11. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice 2013 DR650

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    Wow, it looks like there is a 2014 standard and a 2014 New Edition.
    It appears that it's just a improved suspension and seat, and a differnt pant scheme with maybe some other stuff.

    I had no clue about a new edition. Man, these guys do keep things on the down low.
    Here is a video with no views on youtube:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s67aRb9K3bQ

    Looks like we got KLR650 version 2.1

    We are looking for version 3.0.

    I'd say 100lbs loss of weight is KTM country, and asking too much.

    I'd keep the horse power, just go F.I. and air cooled and make the frame light enough to be just under 400lbs topped off with current tank, improve suspension, fix the doh and thermo-bob, add $2,000 to MSRP.
    It would be like having the 1st generation upgraded the way it should have been.

    Until then, the DR650 is the better choice if you are wanting to go off the well packed forest roads.
    #11
  12. Murphy Slaw

    Murphy Slaw Long timer

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    That didn't take long......

    :rofl
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  13. todd900ss

    todd900ss Been here awhile

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    The title sucked me in but same ol' same from the Japanese. Let's hope Yamaha has something new for us in the next year.
    #13
  14. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice 2013 DR650

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    And I've never owned or ridden one.:lol3

    Hell, in another thread I totally just tried to sale a Mighty DR to a person who started a thread with their first post.

    It really is a great 50/50 dualsport.
    #14
  15. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice 2013 DR650

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    With the way these companys keep things on the down low, it would be a great surprise, and welcome.

    Here's to ignorance being bliss...:1drink
    Until the first week of January. After that it's go time for a MC.
    #15
  16. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice 2013 DR650

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    http://www.autoevolution.com/news/kawasaki-shows-a-new-edition-klr650-photo-gallery-73532.html

    "The 2014 Kawasaki KLR650 New Edition is a new dual-sport bike which will be sold alongside the base model, introduced at the IMS in New York recently.

    Since Kawasaki already introduced the 2014 KLR650 in the summer, the New Edition is not exactly a full model year machine. We ran a comparison between the two bikes and all the generic specs are identical, down to dimensions, weight and so on.

    However, it looks like the New Edition comes with revised suspensions and a different seat. Motorcycle.com has discussed with Kawasaki at the NYC IMS and they say that the major differences are in the suspension area.

    The 2014 Kawasaki KLR650 New Edition brings 40% firmer fork springs and 27% firmer rebound damping, while the Uni-Trak reacr shock has a 63% higher spring rate and its rebound damping is 83% firmer. This means the 2014 Kawasaki KLR650 New Edition will perform very nicely even when fully loaded.

    The seat was also redesigned, and comes with good-looking panels in the rear, and a more tapered profile in the front, for a shorter reach to the ground. The livery also changes a bit, as the bike is offered in Candy Lime Green and Ebony, Metallic Flat Raw Graystone and Ebony or Pearl Stardust White and Ebony.

    Prices went $100 (€73) up, to $6,599 (€4,830)."

    ___
    I thought I'd look back into this bike. I can't find any good youtube reviews.

    __
    For an extra $100, it seems like the buyer is getting a good deal.
    Seems like the suspension overall is better. Looks the weight is the same.

    For those a who found the seat too high on the 2013, the narrow seat could help out a lot here on the New Edition.
    _
    It would be nice to get some guy on the ground intell on this bike.

    __
    What's funny is that maybe this should have just been the improvments from back in 2008.
    1. Better suspension
    2. Improved seat.
    #16
  17. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice 2013 DR650

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    3. Forgot about the doh.

    My mistake.
    #17
  18. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice 2013 DR650

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    http://canadamotoguide.com/2014/01/08/details-kawasakis-klr650-new-edition/

    "
    Back in December, Kawasaki announced their upgraded KLR650 New Edition model. Here are some more details on that bike.
    [​IMG] It’s not quite “all new,” but the KLR’s changes should be good value for riders who want to load their bike down with heavy luggage.

    According to their website, the machine is all-new, but most of the bike is still the same 2008-up model. It still has the same motor, and no EFI. The major upgrade is to the suspension; the front suspension has been beefed up, with more dampening, and the rear shock got the same treatment. There’s also a stiffer spring in the rear shock.
    Also, the New Edition’s seat is narrower at the front and wider at the rear, which should make it easier to ride the bike on and off the pavement. It’s available in black/green, or black.
    MSRP for the New Edition is $6,999 in Canada, a $100 increase over the standard KLR’s price last year. In the US, the New Edition and standard models will run side-by-side, but in Canada, the standard bike isn’t available this year. Leftover 2012 and 2013 models have been discounted to a $6,399 MSRP on the Kawasaki website."
    #18
  19. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    yes for $100 more this should be the model choice of anyone buying a klr as the base spring rate was too soft any way. this is of course for those who will not be optimizing their suspension beyond what the factory did.

    of course, those in the know will buy the 2014 base model (which may now be discounted more than $100 off just because) or a left over 2013 (for even more discount). then they will immediately throw the rear shock in the trash and buy a properly-built Cogent shock. they will also buy the correct fork spring rates (for their weight) and use Cogent DDC valves or toss the spring completely and use Progressive's drop in cartridge units.

    ...and overall have a MUCH better suspended bike than this "new" edition.

    see suspension options here:
    http://www.happy-trail.com/Departments/Find-Your-Bike/Kawasaki/KLR650E-08-plus-/Suspension.aspx
    http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/klr650.html#suspension


    then again the new edition might be value if you are good at selling up. you immediately pull the shock and sell it to another KLR owner who is to cheap to buy a cogent but needs a stiffer shock. after someone tests the new fork spring rate, we'll know what weight of a ride it truly is sprung for. this may be you ideal spring rate from the get go or you could sell this spring to someone whom it is and buy ($100) your correct rate. the fork still needs proper valving either way as it's antique rod-style damping in their vrs modern cartridge damping!

    as for the "new" seat it's just smoke and mirrors & is still a poor factory seat.
    seat concepts, sargent or corbin is still needed if you plan to ride more than an hour or 2 and for sure if you tour.
    #19
  20. RFVC600R

    RFVC600R SAND EATER

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    They can improve what they want, but it's still gonna be slow and still a KLR at the end of the day. If they weren't so underpowered, I'd get one. What is reliability worth if you can't have fun??
    #20