2016 Rising Sun (Spoked) Adventure Bikes Rating (road/off road)

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by mcmann, Nov 1, 2015.

  1. kconville

    kconville Avant Guard Dog

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    Why would I want to do that? It's a long distance dual sport/ADV bike. Knobbies and stiffer legs won't do well on pavement.

    LOL? A good rider can use pretty much any bike anywhere. No surprise. That doesn't mean it's well suited for the task or enjoyable doing it.
    I once rode a Motobecane 10 speed across the US with 50 pounds of gear on it. Poorly geared and noodly frame. Broke half the stuff on it but I prevailed. It was the gear of the time. It wouldn't be a very good choice today. If you're strong and motivated one can make anything "work".

    I will say that the one bike of this genre that looks interesting to me is the Honda. It looks more real and is lighter. As a travel bike that can get a little dirty, yeah.
    MrKiwi likes this.
  2. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    I've ended up in places on a DL 650 which would make you think twice on a 250cc dirt bike.

    That's not to say the DL is in any way ideal, but it's ability to tractor up hills and through mud has taken me places I've regretted being once I've got there. (It's a lot harder riding a pig down steep greasy hills than it is riding it up). That said, it was always fun once I'd got us back out ...

    The biggest difference is I suspect the speed with which you can take the nasty stuff rather than weather it's possible or not.
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  3. jdrocks

    jdrocks Gravel Runner

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    if your bike didn't come with spokes, no problem, spoke wheels can be easily fitted to any of the Japanese bikes mentioned, usually pretty cheap. add a few other mods, ride it just about anywhere...within reason.

    [​IMG]

    all 3 bikes have proven popular choices, with any known shortcomings easily addressed...except weight, they'll never be light no matter what you do.
  4. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer

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    Generally true. Except when the additional inertia of the bike and motor becomes an asset. A heavy bike with a large motor combined can lazily cross obstructions that would have a smaller bike dancing around. The increased flywheel affect of a big motor makes popping over moderate step ups and such a simple matter of maintaining throttle rather than having to judge how much twist will be required to not flame out or send the bike over the obstacle with the rider no longer attached to it.

    If only it were all roses... Sadly it's not. Dealing with that extra weight and inertia when the bike wants to do something the rider is trying to avoid can be a real bitch Lol.
  5. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff.

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    LOL - True. And once the heavier bike gets leaned over you are absolutely going to let it fall faster than the lighter bike.

    But two things not mentioned so far in how well any bike handles off-road are design geometry and how the power is delivered. Just using the Tenere as an example, everybody who rides one for the first time is surprised about how much smaller it feels in off-road maneuvering when they get on. It's because the rake/trail/bars/etc more resemble those angles and proportions of a smaller bike. It will happily plod along at 3-4 mph, bouncing off the skid plate. The weight is still there and it's sure not your friend in terms of leaning over or when stuck, but as soon as the wheels turn the geometry gives maneuverability which makes the rider able to do more or be more comfortable.

    In power delivery, it's pretty common knowledge that a single is better off road than a 4 cylinder, and for good reasons. One is that during the power pulse the rear tire slips slightly and the longer period without power in the 720 degrees of crank rotation allows the tire to hook back up. For a given number of cc's the single will generally also have more torque than horsepower, partly because a heavier flywheel is needed to keep the engine moving between power pulses.

    In 1995, Yamaha intentionally took this thought, applied it to their twins, and other manufacturers use it today. People praise it in Honda's Africa Twin and some of the Triumphs. While most twin cylinder engines provide a power stroke every 360 degrees of crank rotation , the twins with 270 or 277 degree cranks are more like a single when it comes to power delivery off of pavement. The trade-off is that these bikes may feel slightly less zippy on the road, because they are more torquey and less in hp. The larger twin with a crossplane crank will have more rotating mass, meaning the engine revs up slightly slower when you twist the throttle.

    [Cross-plane cranks in V8 cars and 4 cylinders like the Yam sport bikes work too, but that's another topic.]
    zxrider11 and BaldKnob like this.
  6. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    Even if the lighter machine may bounce around more easily, for muddy or otherwise slippery surfaces I'll still pick it over a heavier one any day of the week.
  7. mcmann

    mcmann Motorcycle ADV enthusiast

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    I only appreciate a heavier bike while riding in gusty crosswinds on an open road . . .
  8. MUDHWY

    MUDHWY Pins & Needles

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    This heavy 2016 Japanese ADV bike is sure treating my right so far. :thumb

    [​IMG]
  9. Motor7

    Motor7 Been here awhile

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    "I feel your judgement and i reject it" :D

    You are correct, but the reason most of us choose a "big" ADV bike is to get us to the off road fun stuff. I like to ride both pavement and off road and I tried a "little" bike or two and I just can't stay in their saddles for 10+ days back to back. My DL handles that with ease and gets me as far off the pavement as I am comfortable....so for me it's a win win:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  10. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    And how many people it takes to pick it up off the ground
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  11. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff.

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    Motor7 wrote the key words "for me."
    I know that a female can pick up a Tenere alone. Beyond that is up to you.
  12. Motor7

    Motor7 Been here awhile

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    Ha, yes....stripped for trail riding no problem. Loaded for 2+ weeks......uhmmmm I have picked it up but I swear I could taste my spleen when I was done:eek7

    The damn thing lays flat, a 800lb Road King is way easier to pick up due to the engine guard elephant ears. The trick, we all have to learn is to never drop our bikes:jkam