250cc scooter w/sidecar?

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by tugboat, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    #21
  2. tugboat

    tugboat MicroTourer (tm)

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    With three wheel scooters there is no place to carry a wheelchair. A sidecar is the only legal method I've found in the U.S.A.
    #22
  3. MiniBike

    MiniBike Been here awhile

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    Nice set up. I wouldn't mind finding something like that for my wife.
    #23
  4. Ogre_fl

    Ogre_fl Long timer

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    Very cool.
    Glad to hear you are rolling on 3 wheels now :clap
    #24
  5. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    The above image helix is of a taxes sidecar set up that are 4 grand new. More then one person has just gone to a wielder and said I need a custom rear side rack to hold my chair. If the guy here whom just got his elite 150 going can hang a surf board on it with a custom rack don't see why a chair rack holder can be made up. Even something like small rear side box you could slip it into . Guess it all depends on how new your chair is. Seen some chairs out through that just pop apart with no tools. Then again that's for non eletriacl ones. eg like what these guys make . http://www.trike-design.co.uk/information/disabled-adaptions/
    also this show: http://www.spinalistips.se/tip-transfer-from-wheelchair-to-motorcycle-671.html

    Look at this for images of wheelchair motorycles : http://www.google.com/search?pws=0&hl=all&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=bZ6JUcXUGYPniwKzSw&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAQ&biw=1920&bih=935&q=motorcycle%20wheel%20chair%20rack#pws=0&hl=all&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=%22+wheelchair+motorcycle%22&oq=%22+wheelchair+motorcycle%22&gs_l=img.12..0l2j0i24l3.126041.126041.7.129465.1.1.0.0.0.0.53.53.1.1.0...0.0...1c.1.12.img.8QqEv5auqHU&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&bvm=bv.46226182,d.cGE&fp=ed3797b74f68a6bc&biw=1920&bih=935
    And finely to light it up for everyone grandmother :
    [​IMG]
    #25
  6. cdwise

    cdwise Long timer

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    I don't have photos but when one of our club members was in an accident that kept her in a wheelchair while it healed (due to complications that was nearly a year) she rode a Helix with a Towpac trike kit and one of the guys mounted one of those trunk mounted bicycle racks on the top of the Helix trunk to hold her folding wheelchair. Worked great and as she progressed to crutches the rack was removed and a bracket to hold crutches was put on the towpac fender to hold her crutches. Eventually she was able to return to two wheels but that was over 18 months after her injury.

    In another group I ride with one of the women had a Burgman 650 with a sidecar that took mobility scooter. She could ride the mobility scooter up the dropdown ramp then flip it up to lock the mobility scooter in place. She'd then slide over to the Burgman for riding. Sometimes she'd carry a passenger on the mobility scooter while riding.

    FWIW, we have a few members who ride scoots with towpac trike kits on because they have no sense of balance either due to medical issues or in one case because she's so short even a Helix is hard for her to flat foot.
    #26
  7. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    Now, here's a dumb question:

    Does a person really NEED a "sense of balance" to ride a two-wheel cycle?

    Seriously. The wheels...are like gyroscope wheels. Which is why it's nothing to ride upright fast...even put the feet on the handlebars, lean back, and text; as some of our Asian friends have done on YouTube videos.

    Riding SLOW...takes more WORK. Like in, slow-walking speed. In Ohio, where I took my motorcycle-endorsement test...they used to have a slow-riding test. Race through it and you fail; it wasn't speed; it was balance they were testing.

    So...I have to wonder, if anyone who was with medical issues but brave enough, could get a scooter up to gyroscope-balance speed and ride away.

    A trike kit may offer comfort; but methinks it detracts from the riding experience. Thirty-five years ago, I had a boss who was terminally ill with cancer...his last act outside the hospital, was to ride 100 miles to the VA Medical Center to check in. He was weak and light; his family had to hold the Harley when he got on...but he was underway, and followed by his daughter's family, he got to the hospital. Two weeks later, he passed away.

    He didn't want a trike kit.
    #27
  8. MiniBike

    MiniBike Been here awhile

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    Maybe 25 years ago, I saw a guy in Daytona (Bike Week) with no legs. I guess to be accurate, I should say that his legs had been amputated above the knee. When he came up to a stop, he used his crutches to hold the bike up. Over the course of a few days, I saw him several times and always the same routine. Once stopped, he'd stow the right crutch using the left as a kickstand. I didn't want to be a jerk or stare at him to see if he had done any other accommodations, but I thought it was cool that he was still doing his thing.
    #28
  9. tugboat

    tugboat MicroTourer (tm)

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    Update on the Helix and sidecar...
    First let's go back. I have ridden motorcycles for over fifty years. During that time I've visited all the US states and Canadian provinces that can be gotten to by road. I've been in ten of the Mexican states. I give you this background so you understand that I know my way around bikes.

    A stroke left me deaf and with a screwed up internal gyro that keeps me from walking. A sidecar seemed like a good idea. Always thought they looked cool. Asking around it became obvious a sidecar would take a lot of study before I got involved. That was taken care of when I had a relapse. I lay in the hospital bed reading anything I could find about sidecars. The nurses thought I was nuts. After getting out of the hospital the second time, I bought an old Yamaha SR500 with a sidecar. The SR500 was a kickstart only. The third time I got off somewhere and couldn't start the thing my wife decreed the I needed another bike. <label for="rb_iconid_27">:wink:</label> That led to a newer Yamaha and new sidecar. The next bike had plenty of power and a professionally set up sidecar. I couldn't manage the touchy clutch with my lack of hearing.

    What I needed was an automatic transmission, and it was obvious I wasn't going to ride far. The Helix was available, cheap, and needed a lot of work. I decided to give it a try.

    I built the sidecar frame from scratch. I used the body from a 1978 Spirit Eagle sidecar. I was concerned about the scooter having enough power, or the sidecar being too big. Turns out that the Helix is a better tractor than the SR500. The car is made of some sort of plastic and very light. It is so light that it requires ballast even with a passenger. Being a long distance rider, I removed the seat. The car as pictured has an auto battery, three gallon aux. fuel cell, two spare tires, camping gear, tools, and space for my clothes. The wheelchair folds up and fits between the car and scooter. Top speed is about 60 MPH. Gas consumption is about 53 mpg.

    I am in the process of reworking the rig. Using the Helix as a rig means that if corners flat. Unlike an ATV or motorcycle rig, there is no fuel tank to grab with your knees. All that holds one on is your arms on the handlebars. Even the seat is made to lean in the curves. To combat this, I'm fitting a seat from a power wheelchair complete with armrests and seatbelt. I plan to remove the car and install a flat floor that I can ride the wheelchair onto, latch it down, then transfer into the seat. Pictures when I'm finished.

    There is a step-by-step instruction with pictures by a Helix owner named Limpwell over on the Yahoo site. Good stuff there. You can use most anything for a body. My sidecar was stored behind my shop. Using it was a no brainer for me. If you can weld, you can build a frame. Very little money is needed. Riding a sidecar rig takes a LOT of practice.

    Ray
    #29
  10. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    yahoo link please? I ve seen people fit the type of seat you would put in a race car on a helix.. Glad you can find a way to ride still. I wonder if you could set up a reverse off the sidecar wheel using a starter motor mounted so it some how turn the sidecar wheel backwards. A chain or little solid rubber tire that you can drop down on it's wheel and hit a button to make it go. Just a wild Idea . Can't wait to see the pictures. I believe the guys whom made the helix rig below use shims under it to get the lean in and out correct. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #30
  11. tugboat

    tugboat MicroTourer (tm)

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  12. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. ยง 2(3)AVV

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    A friend has a starter motor mounted. Driven with a fan belt to a fan belt disc (? vocabulary) that is fixed on the sidecar-wheel axle instead of an original spacer.
    A generator should work, too.
    Those are rather mounted to give extra way in deep snow; might even drive both directions, if you put a switch to change polarity, but in your case backwards should moreless do.

    good luck and a lot of fun with your rig :wave
    #32