2nd Gen. Ducati Multistrada (2013 and newer)

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Salvo, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. Salvo

    Salvo Adventurer

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    [​IMG]

    excerpt from Ducati
    The brand new range, full of owner-inspired improvements, signals the next stage of the Multistrada journey with a longlist of fascinating and high-tech features. It includes the Multistrada 1200 with the associated Riding Mode technologies of Ride-by-Wire (R-b-W) and Ducati Traction Control (DTC) in addition to the very latest in ABS, while the Multistrada 1200 S Touring is now equipped with Ducati Skyhook Suspension (DSS), R-b-W, DTC and ABS with additional side luggage, heated grips and centre stand. The new touring flagship of the range for 2013 is the Multistrada 1200 S Granturismo with increased side luggage capacity, top case, additional LED illumination, enhanced wind protection and long-distance tires, while the enhanced Multistrada 1200 S Pikes Peak celebrates the sporting side of the model’s character with a replica of the famous 2012 mountain race bike in its stunning new race-winning livery.
    #1
  2. Dave.0

    Dave.0 Been here awhile

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    The gem of this bike is the motor, the last thing it needed was more complicated electronics and suspension trickery. They never really seem to get the last batch sorted - cue the new barrage of recalls.

    And I'm not a hater, I really like my 2010 mts, but this move seems misguided and premature.
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  3. dsauer

    dsauer Been here awhile

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    I'm looking at a 2010 Multistrada 1200S Touring bike. I'm wondering how often a person actually changes the riding modes. Is it that cool of a feature to have 4 riding modes or do you just end up in the one you like best all the time (the more powerful one, I assume)?
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  4. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

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    I do use the different modes, usually to give myself a horsepower time out because 150 hp in a light nimble chassis just begs to be tugged constantly and my self control is very very poor.
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  5. dsauer

    dsauer Been here awhile

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    Now that's funny right there... :rofl
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  6. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    I'm glad someone has started a new thread on the Multi 12, and since the Beasts thread (there was one in Road Warriors also) on the original Multi 1200 has got most of the traffic, perhaps it is appropriate that it is started up here.

    The new bikes are certainly different enough to deserve a thread on their own, IMO, even if a lot of the changes have been covered in the original thead, here (which is about to hit the 250 page mark).

    A quick summary of the changes:

    - redesigned cylinder heads with a second spark plug, re-angled fuel injectors and an air-bleed into the exhaust port just past the valve, which cleans up unburnt hydrocarbons and allows a richer mixture aimed at cleaning up low-rev response.

    - a result of the above is said to be 10 per cent better fuel efficiency at 55mph.

    - real-time computer-controlled damping by Sachs, which reads axle acceleration from sensors every 5 milliseconds and adjusts to prevent bottoming and preserve chassis attitude. Early reports on the performance are good, if qualified; serviceability and longevity yet to be specified. The performance looks good in vids (ride footage starts at 1:35):

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/l8G1Vmh7iCo?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    - LED low-beam headlamp and the low beams stay on when the incandescent high-beams are selected.

    - the latest Bosch ABS, which adjusts with the riding mode and links front and rear brakes.

    - The GT model pictured above, plus a Pikes Peak version (below) with forged aluminium wheels and new paint:

    [​IMG]

    - rear brake line routing claimed to be redesigned to avoid trapping gas, allegedly eliminating the frequent bleeding reportedly demanded by the prior incarnation.

    - a much stiffer rear spring specified standard, up from 85N/mm straight wound to 85-125N/mm progressive.

    - revised traction control, which controls ignition and then fuel injection.

    - slightly roomier rider's seat (likely the same as introduced on the 2012 version).

    - One-hand adjustable windscreen, that is also slightly taller and wider.

    - hazard warning option (turns on all blinkers).

    - Same riding modes (which now control ABS also), same 150hp, 5 per cent max torque boost to 125Nm.

    But ...

    - No more Ohlins.

    - Standard (i.e. non-"S") model sticks with Marzocchi/Sachs manually adjusted fork and shock.

    - White and black colour schemes abandoned for silver-grey on the S-Touring, red remains.

    - still no electronic cruise control - the chief engineer said it would have been easy to do but he had no idea anybody would want it.


    The redesigned cylinder heads should remove the most urgent reasons for bypassing the closed-loop fuelling with an expensive full-exhaust from Termignoni. The upgraded rear spring should support two-up riding while preserving rear ride-height and steering. Whether it all works as advertised, and keeps working, we'll find out after the production bikes are released in December. I'm hoping, while bracing for disappointment.

    But I really am hoping ... :lol3
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  7. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    There is something interesting about this paint scheme. Good and bad at the same time.

    And Termignoni is standard on the Pikes Peak.

    Ducati invited Desmo club leaders in Italy for a ride on the 2013's. They all mentioned the motor is very fluid at low RPMs, claiming people can now ride on taller gear while on lower speeds.

    Also, someone mentioned that the 5% higher torque in the motor is noticeable.

    And the Skyhook, all positive comments. More than one person indicated less "feel" from the front end. One of them later talking to other riders on the group, learned that he could have adjusted compression damping (his specific complaint) to the front end to his liking.

    BMW HP4 will also be released with semi-active suspension.

    The particular system in the Ducati, from Sachs, is actually an "off-the-shelf" unit that has been available in cars for more than 10 years already (Maserati, Ferrari are two I've heard so far). So it is nothing new or unproven. Except that it has never been applied to motorcycles before. So it remains to be seen/experienced. The bike now does not have the Ohlins bling factor... Nor the expense that comes along with it. It would be really interesting if the Sachs system turns to be more trouble free than the Ohlins.

    It is a new trend that maybe won't be as popular as ABS (and ABS has safety regulations behind it), but is likely to be prevalent on most higher end bikes in the near future.

    Lion
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  8. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    The Termi is just the slip-on, which does nothing at all - same ECU and all the muffling is under the motor.

    But likely all that is needed.

    Thanks for reporting the club-rider comments. Sounds promising. :D

    Yes, would be nice if the Skyook proved durable. Time will tell - when it is too late for most of us. :1drink
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  9. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    Not only durable, but I'm VERY interested to hear how it compares to the Ohlins in actual performance. SACHS has never been the first choice for aftermarket suspension, where Ohlins pretty much owns that space. I'm dubious "semi-active" suspension components will change that, but it will be interesting to hear what real riders say once these come out.

    -SM
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  10. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    Two bits of information, from an interview with the head of design for the 2013 Multistrada: 1) he mentioned Ohlins did not offer a progressive spring. Apparently this system uses a progressive spring. 2) The Sachs with the Skyhook (I like how a few Italians in the Multistrada Forum refer to it as GancioCielo, same thing but in Italian, sounds more primitive that way, hey I'm Italian, I can say that :-) ) is less expensive than the Ohlins setup on the 2010-12 Multis.
    #10
  11. llamapacker

    llamapacker Mr. Conservative

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    Tuneboy has CC up on his site for the Multi12, he deserves the money since the factory sees no need.
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  12. Josephvman

    Josephvman I'm the Decider

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    I like the switchable ride modes on my Multi, but I'm not sure how I feel about compression and rebound changing in real time based on what the bike thinks I need.
    #12
  13. Dave.0

    Dave.0 Been here awhile

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    The new suspension may be "great", but I suspect this was more of an accounting move for ducati than actually trying to improve the performance of the bike.

    I think the ohlins are great. maybe thats because I weigh about 160lbs, or I just don't know any better, but if they are going to improve on the ohlins setup these new Sachs must be phenomenal.
    #13
  14. fixinbones

    fixinbones Tarmac Adventurer

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    It sounds like a great idea but as you mention lets see how it fairs with the Sachs hardware which is no comparison to Ohlins. My first impression is that I'd probably take Ohlins ESA over Sachs sky hook. For my riding the skyhook sounds overkill and the ride of the Ohlins ESA is pretty awesome.
    #14
  15. oalvarez

    oalvarez Resident Raggamuffin

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    agree completely....the rider from MCN believed it to be more "touring like" in nature. will be interesting to hear what others will have to say.
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  16. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    This seems to be the common response from journalists so far.

    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:punctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp/> <w:DontBreakConstrainedForcedTables/> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx/> <w:Word11KerningPairs/> <w:CachedColBalance/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="&#45;-"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--> Justin Dawes, Motorcycle USA:

    This brings us to what you&#8217;ve been patiently waiting for &#8211; the evaluation of the Skyhook Suspension. Short and simple answer, it works and works well. As we headed out of town I immediately set to switching up the riding modes to see if I could feel a difference between them. Without a doubt the changes between each mode is marked and noticeable.

    Each is calibrated to that mode&#8217;s intended usage with Sport being the most stiff and Enduro the softest. That being said, each model was amazingly compliant when needed. Even in the Sport setting the suspension was glued to the tarmac no matter the surface. As well as it works, not all is perfect. I am a rider that relies on front-end feel to gauge my margin for error when entering a corner. Because the suspension follows the road so well and back-to-front weight transfer during braking is reduced, feedback from the front tire is slightly muted. This is most notable on turn-in. That being said, after about an hour in the saddle I gave up caring that I had less feel and things got fun. You just have to trust the system as you would traction control. As soon as that trust was established, the Multistada was a corner-carving virtuoso. Ducati Skyhook Suspension takes electronically adjustable suspension to a new level and is unbelievably calibrated for a first generation system.

    John Burns, Cycle World:

    Skyhook is fully integrated with the selectable riding modes (Touring, Sport, Enduro and Urban), and adjusting damping and rear preload is as simple as pushing a couple of buttons. In the correct sequence. It&#8217;s not too difficult even if you&#8217;re jet-lagged, overhung and over 40. The latest Bosch 9ME combined ABS is likewise fully integrated with the various riding modes, and now lets the rider lock the rear wheel in Enduro mode, among other things. It uses the same control unit as the Panigale.

    The new, dual-rate rear spring&#8217;s second stage is stiffer than before. Between it and the Skyhook, the bike is able to put all its considerable power down and really launch itself out of corners, with a nice seat bolster to keep the rider in place and a widish, tapered aluminum handlebar to keep him somewhat in control.

    On the other hand, when diving into those tight corners with the brakes on, Skyhook didn&#8217;t seem to allow the front end to stroke deep enough to weight the front tire as much as some might prefer. (After our Bilbao ride, some other journalists said that Touring mode is the way to go for more weight transfer.) Later, reading through the press material, I realized it&#8217;s also possible to add or reduce compression and rebound damping from either end by manipulating the DSS buttons. My bad. Less compression up front might&#8217;ve been just the ticket. Apart from that, you&#8217;ll have to be a swifter rider than yours truly to find fault with the Multi&#8217;s ride and handling. We&#8217;ll delve (dive?) deeper into tuning DSS when we get a testbike stateside.
    #16
  17. cug

    cug --

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    I doubt it was just accounting. Most people bought the S Touring. And if you look hard at the changes they made for the 2013 model, they are all, without exception to make the Multi a better touring bike:

    1) Slightly higher windshield
    2) Better low rpm handling
    3) Touring suspension that'll adjust on the fly to make it "just right"
    4) Longer seat
    5) Better fuel economy
    6) LED lights
    7) Easier adjustable windshield
    8) Hazard lights

    These are all things a touring bike rider that spends more than 20k USD on a bike is looking for.

    The Multi was (and is) already a superb carver, I really think they added/changed exactly the right components to attract more of the customers they already mostly get with the current Multi: people with money who want an excellent bike that can really rip but is also a great tourer. The "really rip" part was already near perfect, the touring part was good, but had room for improvement to pull over more GS / Tenere / Tiger / ... riders.

    For example, all the changes make me re-consider the Multi. I want to test ride the 2013 model again, after I was fairly disappointed with the 2010. My riding is 50% weekend trips, 40% day trips on really bad back roads, 10% commute. For that the 2010 Multi just didn't feel right to me. Will be interesting to compare to the new one.
    #17
  18. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    I agree with you. And to add to your rational, a few extra points:

    1. Average age of the Multistrada buyer: 47
    2. For the majority of Multistrada owners, it was their first Ducati (so the Multi is that important point of entry to the brand).
    3. The Multistrada is Ducati's highest seller.
    4. Besides the current lineup, and the updates to the Multistrada, Ducati has three new bikes coming up at the midlevel point, which will be more targeted to the younger crowd.
    5. Ducati has been targeting the American market.

    So I agree, the Multistrada 1200, not unlike the Diavel, is a new and successful marketing segment for Ducati. And the new 2013 Multistrada is a better touring bike. The Grandturismo is the finetuned, upgrade of that touring mode. The Pikes Peak is the model for the ones that look at it from another vantage point, but can sill tour with the bike.

    So yes, like Ducati itself says, they have heard they customers, and they have analyzed who their consumer base is.

    Lion
    #18
  19. coast range rider

    coast range rider Been here awhile

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    Better low rpm running is a big deal to me since I routinely seem to be riding steep hairpin turns with wet leaves and even small tree branches on them. I never even bothered to test ride the 2010 model because of this.
    I'm starting to run out of reasons not to buy this bike.
    If they had replaced timing belts with timing chain and simplified or eliminated the valve adjustment that would have made the difference for me.
    Who knows what will happen after my test drive? December, right?

    On a separate note, from the pictures, does the paint job on the old Pike's Peak model look better than the new one, or is it just me?
    #19
  20. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    Valve adjustment, every 15k miles. At least you've got that.

    Now, the color scheme of the 2013 Pikes Peak: attractive on a slutty sort of way.
    #20