2up tent advice

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by 2Vulcans, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. VStromTom

    VStromTom Long timer

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    One does NOT have to spend $300-400+ on a tent to get something that will last, be dry, easy to set up, and small enough to pack well on a bike. Don't drink that kool-aid. Shop closeouts, shop www.TheFind.com, Amazon, etc. Suggest using a blanket on your living room floor folded to the dimensions of what you are considering for a 2 up tent. Lay down on it with your sleeping bag, next to your bunk mate. You will get a decent idea of footprint and fit for 2 people. Works for me. Good luck.
    #21
  2. wee-twin

    wee-twin Been here awhile

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    MSR Hubba Hubba, nice vestibules, near vertical walls, poles are short so easy to store, great ventilation. A few years ago backpacker magazine gave it their gear award and since then MSR has made some minor tweaks to make it even better.
    #22
  3. cug

    cug --

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    Too small for two people with motorcycle gear. It is already small for two people without the heavy gear when we are hiking. Get a Mutha Hubba for two people with bike gear if it needs to be a MSR.
    #23
  4. Gale B.T.

    Gale B.T. Long timer

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    #24
  5. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy

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    My wife and I have had the REI Taj III for almost 7 years, and it's been one of our very best investments. It's kept us dry in some biblical downpours, held strong in 60-MPH sustained Death Valley winds, and still looks nearly new to this day. We average 30-40 nights per year in this tent, and it's large interior space was one of the big selling points. The setup can be a bit fussy the first few times, but it doesn't take long to get the drill memorized.
    It's not the smallest tent when packed, but the size is very managable and the plush comfort and well-thought-out design make it a great buy.

    Good luck with your choice!
    #25
  6. 2Vulcans

    2Vulcans Let's go...

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    The problem is that I really like the idea of a spacious porch for both storing and may be cooking in rainy conditions (half in, half out). Hilleberg makes some really nice ones (even if expensives) but all of them are basically on the ground.
    I now found the Etesian 2 from Wild Country where the porch is actually insulated but it can also unzip to put dirty boots. I just don't really like the description since it is classified as "weekend tent".
    Any opinion on this? or others similar?
    [​IMG]
    #26
  7. cug

    cug --

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    I have a footprint for my Keron 3 pretty much for that reason and to protect the inner tent floor. If desired the footprint can stay attached when packing the tent, though I always take the inner tent our and just hook it in when setting it up to keep it dry and clean and to pack things in two small bags instead of one big bag.

    I think I said this before: if I had the chance of buying a tent again, I'd get the Tarra just because it needs less tension on the stakes to set up. No big deal so far, our Keron 3 is cavernous, packs to about the same size and weight as the Tarra, is about as stable if set up properly, and I have a footprint for it. Perfect tent. It's more that we go hiking in really rocky, hard terrain and there we prefer a self supporting tent over more space. On the bike I don't care, can always decide to go a bit further to find a proper spot. On foot, that's much harder.

    If somebody wants to swap (Tarra to Keron), possibly with money compensation from my side, I might do it. Good way of getting a Keron 3 (which has been used only a few times after I sold my Nammatj 2GT that I was using in Europe) ... :lol3
    #27
  8. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    I swear by Exped tents. It's an Austrian company (or maybe Swiss - no, I think Austrian). In the U.S. you can buy them through Outdoor Research. As the name suggests, it's expedition gear. Won't break down on you when you need it. Takes any kind of weather. Company stands behind their product (I've gotten free replacement parts on products I've owned and used for 6 years).

    They have 1-4 person tents, 3-4 season. Also sell some of the best sleeping mats you can buy; sleeping bags ; etc.

    Count on spending $300-600 for a tent.


    Enjoy your trip!
    #28
  9. drbike

    drbike Been here awhile

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    I use my gear (a lot) for my money the Hilleberg stuff is great. I use a Nallo 3 and have been super happy with it. Our Canadian co-op MEC makes good stuff, sort of like REI and the Nallo has outlasted 3 of their tents (the kids tents). After using my tent for 10 months over 5 years I needed new poles no problems and dam if they even knew what tent I had from the original sale.
    #29
  10. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    A few more thoughts :


    * get a free-standing tent, i.e. one that will hold its shape without any stakes in the ground. So much easier to set up and find the exact right spot.

    * if you want to stay dry : get a tent where you can leave the inner tent attached to the rainfly; or where you can first set up and stake the rainfly, and then clip in the inner tent. If you have to set up (poles, stakes) the inner tent first and then add the rainfly, you will end up with a wet tent some days. I don't understand why so many tents still follow that flawed design...

    * if you're sharing the tent, get one with 2 doors. It will make your life easier :).

    * if you don't plan on carrying it on your back, forget about ultralight and go for spacious (and sturdy) instead.


    Last of all ... Practice setting up in the back yard at least once before your trip! I've had to figure out how to set up a new tent in the dark before, and it does make it more of an adventure :).
    #30
  11. RPJR

    RPJR n00b

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    If you want a large porch or vestibule, The Nemo Asashi has a garage/vestibule that is very large. It's a 4 person tent, so it may be too big. Their Espri series of tents also have rather large vestibules. These come in 3 and 2 person versions. You could probably park your bike in the Asashi garage. I'm getting one next year partly because of that.
    #31
  12. BMW Kurt

    BMW Kurt Bluesman

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    +1

    With me it is all about the vestibule!
    #32
  13. UFObuster

    UFObuster Adventurer

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    Surprised that no one has mentioned the REI half-dome 2+. An expanded version of the half-dome 2.
    Small, light...important if you ride 2-up. Two entrances, 2 vestibules.
    AND if you really want a 'porch', do what all the minimalists do. Get yourself a very light tarp and cords...folded,
    stored, very little extra room, and erect a partial cover over the tent entrance/vestibule. I've seen this used all
    over the smokies for providing a spacious out-door dry area over or near a small tent stretched between trees or
    set up like a lean-to. In trees, erect it high, slight angle to drain, and you can stand and walk around under it.
    #33
  14. cug

    cug --

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    Personally I think it is a bit too small for two people with motorcycle gear. I like to take my gear with me into the tent and not hang everything on the bike and find it wet in the morning.
    #34
  15. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

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    rare is the two man tent that actually has room for two. usually takes 3-4 man tent for two comfortably. kind of like most sleeping bag ratings are survival temps, not sleep comfortable temps.
    #35
  16. rboett

    rboett posser noob 205

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    + 1 ,, Don't leave home without your Mutha.

    compact, quick set up...............
    #36
  17. cug

    cug --

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    X person tents are designed to have just enough space for X persons sleeping in there. No gear, not even hiking boots, just sleeping pads and bags, people. That's it.

    Some more professional manufacturers have a different approach (like Hilleberg, where you always get a certain amount of gear space, but it might really be just Hilleberg.
    #37