50 Summers Ago

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Twotaildog, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    I drained and pulled the tank last night so I could start on the wiring. Of course, in the process, my drain hose slipped off and sprayed gasoline across my face, so the wife wouldn't come near me until I took a shower. By the time I got out of the shower she was asleep, so Daddy din't get no lovin'. :cry

    Anyway, Ed, the PO, had designed and built his own custom wiring harness. He did a good job. He's a Roadie who works for one of the popular country-western artists, on his sound equipment I think, so he knows his way around a circuit. I'm going to have to make some changes though, since I'm moving the switches back to the left side cover. Right now the ignition/headlight switch is in the headlight shell along with an ammeter that's not hooked up (fairly common practice) and two indicating lights, one for the ignition circuit and one for the lighting circuit. After sorting things out I decided to simplify things a bit; I'm going to eliminate the indicating lights and the ammeter so that the only wires going to the headlight shell will be the headlight wires. I ordered a 'blank' headlight shell with no switch, ammeter, or indicating light holes in it. That will be cool: when was the last time you opened a motorcycle headlight that only had headlight wires in it?

    I've got about 150 yards of driveway to clear snow off of, and the Bobcat popped a hydraulic hose, so the wiring probably won't happen today.
  2. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
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    upstate Nebraska
    I scored a Fluke 116 yesterday. It has nothing to do with the bike other than it will get used during the modification of the wiring harness, but I felt like making a post. My buddy Paul owns the local pawn shop in Blair, NE. He was out of town visiting his son last week and I went to the pawn shop a couple of times during the week when the lady that works there needed help. So when I stopped by the Pawn Shop for a cocktail with Paul yesterday evening, they gave me this multi-meter to show their appreciation. I tried not to take it but they slipped it into my coat pocket.

    [​IMG]

    Otherwise, no progress on the bike, my life is all about fixing equipment so I can move snow right now. My driveway is long and steep. The day before the snow hit both of my snow movers (tractor and Bobcat) decided to go kaput. I know the cold stresses everything, but it seemed beyond random. The Bobcat popped a hose and when I went to load it on the trailer to take it to the dealer, the engine heater shorted out so the little diesel engine wouldn't start. Try and find a new engine heater around here right now! You go to the farm stores and there's a bunch of empty hooks where anything that makes heat used to be.

    Sorry for the rant... back to it...
  3. danedg

    danedg Horizontally Opposed

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
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    6,804
    Location:
    U-puku-ipi-sing
    What was that you said?
    Snow?:freaky

    [​IMG]
  4. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    :freaky

    Edit: That is a freaky amount of snow, Dan. The eastern states really got dumped on this year. I was passing through Charlotte airport last week on my way to Philly and had to wait an hour and a half for the plane to be de-iced. I don't think they do much of that in Charlotte.

    Since we're posting pictures of our driveways in winter, I decided I want to play to. These are from two winters ago though, it's not as bad this year (yet).

    This was the first, lighter, snow of the season, I think it was in December and it's about the same amount of snow that we have right now. The house is to the left, the first 20 yards of the drive are paved, and the gravel section extends about another 125 yards to the right of Bambie, through the trees:

    [​IMG]


    This is the second snow of the season, much heavier, it was in February, iirc. The tractor is pointed up the gravel driveway and the tree branches are so heavily laden that I had to shake the snow off of them before I could even get through. This was my first winter living in the country, and I had to learn how to operate the tractor quickly:

    [​IMG]

    Fun stuff. 40% chance today.

    Good reason to stay inside and work on motorcycles.
  5. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    A few bits of minor progress.

    The main skid plate. They want close to $30.00 for a set of the 'J' bolts though, so I made my own from 5/16 'U' bolts from the tractor supply store:

    [​IMG]

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    I zinc plated them so they wouldn't rust:

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    ...and mounted them up:

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    Then on to the shocks. I wanted to use the chromed half covers, to look like the '64 ISDT bikes, so I had to remove the springs. I had to use external spring compressors because the Koni spring retainers were too small to work with the endwise compressor:

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    The Koni spring retainers were a tiny bit too large to fit inside the half covers:

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    So I squared them up in the old Southbend:

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    ... took about ten thousands off of them:

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    ... and they fit right in to the half covers:

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    I set the rebound damping at one turn out from full CCW as a starting point, and put the shocks back together. With the half covers on I was able to use the endwise spring compressor:

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    On the bike:

    [​IMG]

    Now that I look at them on the bike, they might have looked butter with the springs the other way around. Thoughts on that?

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    Coming up:

    Fabricate the left side bash plate:

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    Wiring simplification:

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    Front fender, tire, fork covers, handlebars, controls, etc:

    [​IMG]




    We'll be back, same Bat-time, same Bat-station. Thanks for watching.

    .
  6. Rango

    Rango Phaneropter

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    Location:
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  7. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    Things are looking a bit precarious at the moment...

    [​IMG]
  8. davesupreme

    davesupreme grand poobah

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,846
    Location:
    palm harbor, fla
    nice south-bend!....
  9. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    Thanks Dave. According to the serial number it was made in the '30's. It's a handy size for making spacers and such. I have a larger one that was made in the teens that I started to restore, but the ways and all the sliding surfaces are so worn out that I pretty much gave up on it.

    Between work at home and work at work Bitsy hasn't gotten as much attention as she likes, but I wanted to get her down off of the blocks and into a more stable position before I go out of town next week. A friend of mine has one of those No-Mar tire changers, so I let him mount the tires. The K70's that it had on it are good tires, when I was a kid we used to call that a "universal" tread. I had one on the front of my first dirt bike and I hated it because it wasn't as cool as a knobby. I couldn't afford a new tire and my dad wouldn't buy me one because the JC Whitney catalog said that the one I had was universal, so it should be fine for the dirt. I guess that feeling stuck with me because I like the look of the Mefo's on the Triumph a lot better:

    [​IMG]

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    I also scuffed up those headlight ears/fork covers that I bought with some wet-or-dry, and shot them with some Rustoleum:

    [​IMG]





    While I had the front wheel off I slid the forks down, removed the 'cafe' style headlight ears that were on there and slide the proper ones in place:

    [​IMG]



    I also changed the fork oil while I was in there, just so I'd know what they had. I started on the wiring but no pictures of that. I should be able to knock that out week after next.

    .
  10. Rango

    Rango Phaneropter

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    Kingdom of Belgium
    [​IMG]

    Ehh,
    What's up, doc?
    No pressure, but how's e'going?
    :freaky
  11. England-Kev

    England-Kev Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,788
    Location:
    England. Somewhere on the Canal.
    The air bottle is easy to find, they use the same bottle for spear fishing, scuba, paint ball, and air gunning, as can be seen here...

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Theoben-Rapid-7-MK1-Buddy-Bottle-/261412645583

    :deal
  12. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    Sorry guys. I have gotten a little bit done, but other things have distracted me from taking pictures and posting. I will try to get a post together later today. The front end is back together, except for the fender, and I have rewired the whole bike. I ended up having to make my own clamp on cross-bar for the handle bar. I got a CR style throttle tube and took it and the carb in to have a new cable made, those are back now so I can mount them. Then all I have to do is mount the new clutch cable and the controls will be done.

    Thanks for the tip on the bottle Kev.

    More to come.

    .
  13. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    and by the way, happy Fat Tuesday! :deal :freaky :1drink :wink:


    .
  14. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    A little update on some of the small progress I've made since my last report.

    I had ordered a clamp-on crossbar for the handlebar. It took a long time to arrive and when it got here I didn't like it. The crossbar was too short, so it sat too low, and the clamps had sharp edges and a generally modern, unfinished look. In the first picture below you see the short crossbar and above it is a piece of 1/2" diameter aluminum stock that I cut to roughly the length that I want the crossbar to be. The second picture is the clamps as they were when I received them, slid onto the handlebar:

    [​IMG]

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    I decided to fabricate my own crossbar from the piece of 1/2" aluminum stock. The process consisted of careful application of heat:

    [​IMG]




    Forging the ends with a BFH:

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    Filing the ends to the desired shape:

    [​IMG]


    And then I used some wet-or-dry sand paper to smooth the ends and drilled the holes.





    For the clamps I filed the edges to round them off and give them more of a vintage look:

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    Then I gave everything a trial fit:

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    And once I was satisfied with the fit I took everything back off and polished it on the cotton wheel. Here is the result:

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    It was good to have the handlebar and crossbar mounted now, so I could start installing the controls. I went with one of these CR style throttles that Motion Pro makes, in chrome, to get the throttle cable up out of the weeds. I took the throttle tube and the carb to a local shop and they made me a couple of throttle cables (one for a spare) that mated the CR throttle control to the Mikuni carb:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    And here is the headlight dipper/horn switch assembly installed. This is a universal unit, but it has the vintage look to it. Also note the rubber end on the clutch cable adjuster, I got that from Speed and Sport, and now I've ordered some more so I can put them on all of the cables, and also small ones that will fit on the top of the carb and on both ends of the throttle cable adjuster:

    [​IMG]




    More to come...


    .
  15. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    I don't very have many pictures of this, but I spent a lot of time on it. It turns out that moving the key switch/light switch from the headlight shell to the left sidecover, near to the battery, allows you to simplify the wiring harness a bit.

    I have an original Triumph key switch but it has high resistances in some of the contacts, and the key is similar to a Sampsonite suitcase key from the '80's; they are all the same and none of them are very secure. You can turn the original key switches with a screwdriver or hairpin. I'm using an aftermarket key switch that is made for Sportsters, it has a round key and three positions. The switch above it is an original Triumph lighting switch, it is not wired to anything, it's just there to fill the hole. I was going to use it but again, it had high resistances across some of the contacts, so I didn't. I may replace it with a BMW/John Deere style accessory plug. Pictures of the switches:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    I wired the ignition switch as follows:

    Position 1 - everything is OFF
    Position 2 - power to the Pazon electronic ignition, power to the brake light switches, power to the horn button.
    Position 3 - power to everything in position 2 plus the headlight and taillight.




    I installed a fuse block under the seat. It eliminates the in-line fuses and it also functions as a terminal block and eliminates most of the bullet connectors, and generally helps to organize things. Here is a picture of the fuse block:

    [​IMG]




    The wires in the headlight shell went from this:

    [​IMG]



    To this:

    [​IMG]



    That's about it for now, other than replacing cables etc. I hope to get started on the fenders soon but it's getting into the busy season at work. We'll see. Thanks for listening.


    .
  16. Rango

    Rango Phaneropter

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    1,203
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    Neat, neat.
    Quite a sandwich :D

    Cool how you turned the crossbar around from awful to a jolly pretty.
  17. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,267
    What, What!? A headlight bucket with just the wires for the headlight? Heritic!! :lol3

    Looking fantastic :clap
  18. groop

    groop So much to ponder

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,399
    Location:
    oc, ca
    I am still watching this build closely as I have finally started my 67. How do you like this little plating kit from Eastwood? I am considering it too but the online reviews are mixed. The hardware on my bike is rust-free, but dull and I want to make it look new but not overly polished. Would you recommend the $70 Eastwood kit?
  19. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Oddometer:
    1,388
    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    The Eastwood kit is probably a little overpriced for what it is. I suspect that if a person did a little research, he could put together a similar system for less money. It's just an electrolyte bath with a piece of zinc hanging in it, an alligator clip for the zinc, one for the piece being plated, a couple of lengths of wire, and a current source. It also comes with protective eye wear and a pair of gloves, but most of us have that stuff already.

    The downside of this system is that you can only plate one piece at a time, because you have to clip the little alligator clip to it. If you have a bunch of fasteners and hardware to plate, my opinion is that you would be better off just taking them to a plater, especially if you have one locally. Some of them just charge by weight, so you can take a coffee can full of hardware in to them and get a pretty good price and probably a better job. The risk is that there is always a small potential that they could lose one of your parts. If you're working on a '67 Triumph, there aren't many parts that couldn't be replaced if they were lost. If you were working on a 100 year old bike, I'd worry about it more.

    What I like this system for is when I fabricate a bracket or something and it involves cutting something that was originally plated, I can plate the cut surface and prevent it from rusting.

    Hope this helps...


    .
  20. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

    Joined:
    May 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    6,249
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    Dog, I just bought a book that's recently been released called "Triumph Experimental". It covers their experimental shop during the 60s and 70s and has detail on the factory competition bikes. There's a nice color pic of Norman Hyde with McQueen's ISDT bike. It's a bit pricey, but to me, it's worth it.

    It's sold by Motorsport Publications here in the US. This firm also acts as an agent for subscriptions for British motorcycle magazines. I bought a sub for Bike magazine, and it cost half of the news stand price.

    http://classicbikebooks.com/catalog...1962-p-1277?osCsid=6o704frh9e8i74hhuvi35u9ps2