60/6 Cafe project, Or, be glad you didn't find this on YOUR project

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by bpeckm, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    This is the engine side of the deal:

    .... black fingernails that week......:evil

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    #21
  2. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    The shelf, in all its lubed-up glory....

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    #22
  3. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Just another "hope you don't find this"..............:deal

    Pic of a new throwout bearing, and of a nfg bearing. By the way, this needle bearing was supposed to be an improvement over the ballbearing used in the /6, but word has it that they needles don't last long either: think about the difference in radius of a radially-placed needle: the outside wants to go faster than the inside, so there is constant scrubbing going on, somewhere.... not a great solution :eek1

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    #23
  4. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    great work so far.

    :thumb :lurk
    #24
  5. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Someone asked a question about the wire wheel... don't have a picture of mine, but it looks pretty much like this. I bought a cheapo Delta at Lowe's for maybe $50, took off the grinding wheels and the safety shit, and put on a brass-coated wire wheel on one side, and a buffing wheel on the other.

    By the way, bufffing and polishing supplies can be found at jeweler supply houses. Lowe's and HD have the very basic stuff only.

    PS ALWAYS wear safety glasses when working with wire wheels, ALWAYS. I had a wire come off when I was getting pretty aggressive, and it stuck in my cheek... hate to think of what it would do to the eyes.........:eek1

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    #25
  6. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    What was your question? :ear
    #26
  7. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Well, at least I know someone reads that stuff........:rofl

    I guess I shoulda been "more clearer". Someone asked ME a question with a PM, I told him I would post a pitcher...will edit, to make it better!:lol3
    #27
  8. dragoon

    dragoon I'm the REAL Dingo Joe

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    Slow down, you're making us look bad! :bluduh











    :lol3 Lookin' good!
    #28
  9. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    The project has been slow, the posting has been fast.... I actually started the project back in May. :wink: I worked on getting the seat pan away from the seat this weekend......aarrghgh.




    Wait til I have to post "real time"......:lol2
    #29
  10. Putts

    Putts Gettin' there.

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    ficst

    That's okay, wire brushing bits is cake, sooner or later he'll find he's polishing turds that have to be replaced. Then the cursing and tool flinging will begin.

    He had a fire though, that's a good start.

    Fugit ... I'm in.

    :lurk


    .
    #30
  11. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Yeh, when you run into this stuff, it helps to take a little piece to the wire wheel and feel you have accomplished something, other than tearing, tearing, tearing..............:evil

    This is the pressure plate about to come off: a piece of cake with those oh-so-critical three bolts. They will come in handy later as the flywheel comes off as well.

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    #31
  12. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    Oh, yeah.. the fire- Glad you made it out of that ok.

    There's a bunch of things I find myself doing where I think: This would be a dumb way to die. :lol3
    #32
  13. cRAsH

    cRAsH Banned

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    :lol3
    #33
  14. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    This was getting into the meat of the matter. I was in denial about the rear main... must have been the tranny input seal leaking? Talked to Hucky, he walked me through the process of replacing the rear main... and off we go, with serious trepidation (maybe even doubts?).

    But, as I read over and over in these threads, just jump in, read everything you can, and go for it. So, out come the heavy duties: brace that flywheel, find the 1/2' drive set, l-e-a-n on that breaker bar.... she eases out! Those are serious metallurgy in those flywheel bolts. But, with the proper "coaching" and proper TOOLS, in no time, the flywheel is off, and the mysteriously infamous "rear main seal" comes into view...

    Photo: taking off the flywheel

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    #34
  15. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    So, sharp-minded readers (ADV?) will note that with the clutch carrier off and before the flywheel comes off.... there will be a clutch (plate), clutch spring, and pressure plate...

    :clap Finally: for once, something is GOOD! Matter of fact, now I find out why the clutch pull is relatively hard on this ole girl... The friction disk (clutch plate) has mucho meato left on it, and the pressure plate is dusty but other wise good: give it a quick deglazing (emery cloth!), and it will be good to go. The pleasant surprise is in researching the clutch stuff: the pictures look like the "sport clutch" with extra rivets etc, the Fichtel and Sachs unit. Yahoo... added value. Hot stuff!

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    #35
  16. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Once the flywheel was off, the rear main seal reveals itself... OMG that thing is HUGE! I don't know about the rest of you, but I wa totally surprised at how big that seal is... I mean, we talk bearings and you have an image of a bearing, and then you see the dinky little wheel bearings on these bikes. You talk seals, you think of something an inch around like the tranny seals, but geez, the REAR MAIN SEAL is BIG!

    This is what I found, AFTER having squirted cleaners around the flywheel while I was getting over the denial that MY rear main seal doesn't leak.....

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    #36
  17. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Yeah, when my wife tells me to be careful and not hurt myself on the bike, I get the impression she wasn't talking about setting the bike, the boat and the house on fire at the same time........:wink:
    #37
  18. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    When I got into the rear main and removed it, all looked fine. No visible place to leak, etc. I DID find, when I removed the cover to the oil pump, that the O-ring was pinched and squished, and I wonder if maybe that was the source of the oil leak? :evil

    I replaced the oil pump O-ring per Hucky's recommendation, and tackled the rear main. I had tried to gently get the main seal started the same way I have put in small seals: tap it gently around the edges using a block of wood, but this sucka was to big for that, so I had been thinking....I have had good luck in using the "differential temperature" method of getting tight things to go together. You know, heat the aluminum so that it expands and allows things to go together.... Well, the flipside of that is to cool something to get it to fit into the warmer place....The block was probably 90 F, and I wasn't going to try to heat it up, so.....I soaked the seal in oil overnight, then stuck it into a baggy and threw it into the freezer (missed the photo-op :cry)

    With some trepidation I placed the cold seal into the hole and could just barely get it to start in....bit it did start. I ever-so-gently went round and round with my wood block and tapped it in. Fits!

    Not to anticipate any comments, but, believe me, I am as worried as you are.... I only found out later that there is a special tool for installing the seal at just the correct depth (I eyeballed) and that there is a way to block the crank from moving forward ( was very careful not to push or pull on the crank).

    As they say, time will tell...................:D

    Photo is of the cleaned-up case, prior to seal installation

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    #38
  19. JWhitmore44

    JWhitmore44 pistolero

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    Been there done that. After ordering a 2nd seal and the magical tool from JTWind the second time around went much smoother. :D

    Here's what a rear main seal leak looks like

    [​IMG]
    #39
  20. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Oooff.... that is a serious leak... was that before the first or the second effort...? I have started my engine (my posts are trying to catch up with my work) and haven't seen any gushers yet....:clap
    #40