800GS Blown Clutch Replacement Surgery - DIY

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Lost Roadie, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    No "special tools" needed, if you don't count the torx and e sockets as weird. even then only three sizes needed. Even a Honda 90 needs a special tool.

    I have 32K miles and have a nicely burnt clutch, with no lever adjustment left.

    I took it apart this afternoon, in 30 minutes, never having to get up off the floor. Chitown could easily do this job in a campground.

    Now I just have to locate the parts.

    Big question, should I replace the solid plates too? Mine are kinda darkened, but not what I'd call burnt.

    little observation, there are 18 plates, in my basket some of the middle ish plates had almost no oil on them, and show less wear. The more outer plates were nicely oiled and showed burnt oil evidence on the outer edges. What's up with the uneven oil distribution?

    Pictures and caliper measurements might come tomorrow.

    bobo
    #21
  2. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Location:
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    bobo:

    I would say the steel plates are probably ok unless badly scored, burnt, or warped. In the "old days" sometimes the metal plates were stippled (had small depressions in them) I guess to hold some extra oil.

    I just found the chart below in the "technical data" section of the DVD ... I wish they would reference these charts in the repair part of the manual or put them in-line with the repairs ... damit....... (Joe sorry I didn't have this chart handy when your side cover was off.......)

    Anway, if you've got a calipers and a flat plate handy (I use a sheet of thick glass) you can check the limits. Table below is from the Rev. #4 DVD for F800GS
    Seems kinda funny that a new lined plate could be 3.5mm +/- 0.08 (so could be as thin as 3.42 mm and still meet spec.) and that the wear limit is 3.40 mm - thus giving you a whopping 0.02mm of wear prior to replacement ... why gosh ... that's almost a whole 0.001" :huh

    The wear & warp limit on the plates is 0.15mm or about 0.006"
    Be sure to the free length of the springs, but since the clutch has undergone a re-design the free length may have changed (or it might be the same and just be using heavier gauge spring wire).



    <TABLE border=1 rules=all cellSpacing=0 borderColor=black cellPadding=0 width="100%" frame=box valign="TOP"><TBODY><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>21 - Clutch
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    <TABLE border=1 rules=all cellSpacing=0 borderColor=black cellPadding=0 width="100%" valign="TOP"><COLGROUP><COL vAlign=top align=left width="30%"><COL vAlign=top align=left width="20%"><COL vAlign=top align=left width="30%"><COL vAlign=top align=left width="20%"></COLGROUP><TBODY><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Designation
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Condition
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Value
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Valid
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Clutch type
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top> </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Multiplate clutch running in oil bath
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Number of clutch plates
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top> </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>9 steel plates
    9 friction plates
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top colSpan=4>21 21 - Clutch with driver plate
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top rowSpan=2>Thickness of one lined plate
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>When new
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>3.5 <TABLE style="DISPLAY: inline; FONT-SIZE: 75%; VERTICAL-ALIGN: middle" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD align=middle>+</TD><TD align=left>0.08</TD></TR><TR><TD align=middle>&#8722;</TD><TD align=left>0.08</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE> mm
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top rowSpan=2>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Wear limit
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>min 3.4 mm
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Thickness of one steel plate
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>When new
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>1.5 <TABLE style="DISPLAY: inline; FONT-SIZE: 75%; VERTICAL-ALIGN: middle" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD align=middle>+</TD><TD align=left>0.05</TD></TR><TR><TD align=middle>&#8722;</TD><TD align=left>0.05</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE> mm
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Distortion of one lined plate
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Wear limit
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>max 0.15 mm
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Distortion of one steel plate
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Wear limit
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>max 0.15 mm
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top rowSpan=2>Clutch spring length
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>When new, no load on spring
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>63 mm
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top rowSpan=2>
    </TD></TR><TR><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>Wear limit, no load on spring
    </TD><TD style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 1mm; PADDING-LEFT: 1mm; PADDING-RIGHT: 1mm; PADDING-TOP: 1mm" class=fOne vAlign=top>min 60 mm
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    #22
  3. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    I have changed to inch scale because it's more precise (in the tolerences humans can see). And that's what kind of tool i bought.

    Clutch disc minimum 3.4 mm = 0.134 inches
    Spring minimum 60 mm = 2.362 inches

    I started with the outermost disc, .139". I had to get more beer to continue, and checked the conversion scale. Hmmmm, that's plenty of meat. Then discs 2 to 8 about . 135 each. Then the inner most disc .125

    The biggest spring was 2.425 and then down to about 2.4"

    Lesson: when there's no clutch adjustment left, it's worn out.

    How did I do this in 32K miles? I had much time to think that out in the cage today. I spent the last two summer seasons doing my best to avoid the interstate. Smaller roads = more shifting. Then when I get off pavement I can rarely go more than 5 miles without stopping, there were lots of starts and stops. Add in, my genetic makeup requires what has been described as, "acellerate like a raped ape", at all times.

    I don't think a worn out clutch is that bad given those conditions. I do think the $500 bill is quite spectacular, it will go down. This motor has been designed to have this clutch changed. If the dealer charges more than an hour, the guy is getting lunch in there too.

    I'm not trying to hijack this thread, I hope this is good content. I'll try to add pictures tomorrow. Some of the black magic. And there's a really cool spot to smuggle diamonds under the clutch cover.

    bobo
    #23
  4. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Jul 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
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    thanks Bobo....

    The springs with variance of 0.025 that seems fine.

    I'm thinking ... hmmmmmmmmmm only one plate (the inner most one) is really far out of spec.... I wonder what happens if you just replace that one...??? :evil

    The mechanical advantage ratio of the clutch arm on the disk pack means it doesn't take much of a change in "stack height" to make the arm move from one end of the adjustment range to the other ...

    and .. I agree 32K miles is not bad given your driving style...
    and ...
    yeah it does seem like a set of friction disks should cost a lot less bucks...

    Thanks for the dark art comments and pics in advance!
    #24
  5. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    Or the left engine cover. The mushroom looking thing in the center is the clutch release thing. in this picture it's released and the clutch is engaged.
    [​IMG]

    Now I've pulled in the clutch, the mushroom thing gets pulled outboard against the ball bearing in the center of the disc stack at the top of the picture. Black magic point here, the shope manual has a special note that the "flat" on the mushroom thing needs to match a line from 1:30 to 7:30, so it can grab the shaft correctly when the cover goes on.
    [​IMG]

    this the disc stack. Clutch release bearing in the center.

    [​IMG]
    #25
  6. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    the hole under the basket at 7:00 is the oil in the oil pan. The dipstick goes into that hole. You don't need to drain the oil to do this job (on level ground), I lost maybe 4 oz when the cover came off.

    Under the cover on the upper left is a void, dry, hot, secret, big enough to smuggle diamonds. And since this cover is so easy to get off.........

    the big hole about 9:00 to the left of the basket I think is the center of the crankshaft. The hole at 11:00 is another long oil journal.

    I scare myself when I think about how if a guy just fell over on the correct pointy rock, that hit the cover in the right spot, there could be serious day spoiling carnage.

    [​IMG]

    The mushroom thing out of it's hole, to show the "flat" side.

    [​IMG]

    I've been threatened with getting my parts, clutch discs, spings, gasket and pointy hat tool for the shifter shaft, and 20% tax and fast shipping $450ish, this afternoon. I'll soak the discs overnight and maybe put it together tommorow night. A weeks downtime for a clutch isn't bad, but, the whole job, even the first time, won't take me two hours total work.

    bobo
    #26
  7. BMW_BIKER_KEITH

    BMW_BIKER_KEITH Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    395
    Location:
    St Louis Missouri - USA !
    This may be a dumb question... But is there a flywheel in there somewhere that may need re-surfacing? Or since this is a wet clutch system, maybe there is no flywheel?
    #27
  8. chadams

    chadams Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    214
    Location:
    Blue Mountains
    The steel plates in the clutch pack server the same purpose of a flywheel in a usual car type setup, so no need to machine, just replace when replacing the fibre plates. I change both fibre and steel plates as it's not required very often so I rather be safe then needing to tear the cover off down the track.
    #28
  9. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,321
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    I'll be doing my clutch soon too. Got into some mud and really cooked it up bad. No adjustment left and slipping.

    Question: How much adjustment did the rest of you have from new?

    On mine, the adjuster nuts were all ready two thirds of the way up the threads on the cable when new. It seems there is not a lot of life in these clutches from the begining, and a bit of hard use will be the end of it. Might be a good aftermarket opportunity for someone to produce a tougher unit. Only 16,000 Kms on mine. :huh

    What sort of cost is the whole set of friction and steel plates running just so I go in prepared for the shock. :eek1
    #29
  10. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Jul 5, 2008
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    Location:
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    The Max BMW fiche lists the "kit" at $333.xx

    I think that is springs, friction disks, and the metal plates.
    (not 100% sure on the metal plates being included... but ChiTown's pics show those ... maybe he'll jump in...)
    #30
  11. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,589
    Location:
    On The Road
    Yeah, you are correct JR.

    Sorry for the slacking, been riding, it's nice to see this thread coming along with good info...

    From what I read, most is true... Especially about the secret stash spot!

    It's an easy job, no reason to take it to a dealer IMO.

    Just be sure to get the two plates that are machined with narrower teeth on first and last.
    They might not be the two that have different G7 or G8 markings....

    This isn't fun posting from the iPhone, when I get home I'll update with many photos...

    BTW, the new clutch did well yesterday riding Engineer, Cinnamon, Black Bear, and Ophir pass!
    #31
  12. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

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    Nov 13, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    That's about what I figured. Probably be somewhere around $500+ Canadian.
    #32
  13. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    friction discs, steel discs, springs. $333.79 on my receipt. the friction discs came in two packages, two discs for the inner and outer most positions and seven discs for in between. One of the steel discs is colored black and goes in first.

    add the gasket $24.99

    I couldn't buy the cap for the shift shaft (it protects the shaft seal from the sharp edges of the splined shaft, when you put the cover on). though it's priced at $13.59.

    I'm going to guess I had little adjustment left on the clutch when I got mine new. I fooled with it a lot in order to gain the most slack at the lever (I have small hands and needed the lever closer to the bars). Now there's lots of adjustment, and the engagement point feels wider, pretty much like you'd expect.

    bobo
    #33
  14. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Thanks Bobo ...
    It does sound like they are trying to make it idiot-resistant :lol3

    In the past I have just wrapped a layer of electrical tape around the splined gear-shift shaft to keep it from cutting the oil seal, I reckon I'll keep on with that plan...

    I'd just loose the cap again before I needed it anyway...
    #34
  15. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,589
    Location:
    On The Road
    First, you need to wear out your clutch. I suggest lots of off-tarmac miles, but a mud hole, or steep climb, or sandy wash will do.


    Then order the Clutch kit from BMW that includes springs, plates, and friction disks. I also ordered the gasket, but the old one stayed intact so being a cheap bastard I just re-used it and returned the new one to the dealer. Thousands of miles later no leaking.

    There's seven disks that were marked G8 and two marked G7. The old ones out of the bike were marked G5 and G6.
    8 steel plates the same, one with a divot and darker in color.




    [​IMG]


    Here you can see one of the two plates that are machined to have a slightly narrower tooth.

    [​IMG]




    The plates without the machining.



    [​IMG]








    Both


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]




    Dont forget to soak the new plates in oil. :deal



    [​IMG]










    I changed the oil while I was at it so thats where I started.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]





    I removed the cable.


    [​IMG]





    and the sidestand, along with the many 9mm screws holding the cover on.






    [​IMG]



    Removed shift lever, cover spline with e-tape, remove cover. Here the shift lever came out with the cover, was easy to pop back in.



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]




    Old plates


    [​IMG]



    This is the first plate on the clutch, closest to the motor. It was the only one that was severely worn....

    [​IMG]





    I noticed this half and half weirdness

    [​IMG]








    They don't look too bad do they? :lol3

    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]





    [​IMG]






    new longer springs

    [​IMG]





    OK, the IMPORTANT part.

    Its absolutely necessary to get the one plate with the divot as shown in the manual in first, followed by one of the machined disks with narrower teeth.
    What I found with my kit after hours of trying to figure out what I did wrong was that the machined plated were NOT both the ones marked different.
    I screwed up, and didn't pay attention to the machining (after I photographed it) and just looked at the G7 markings.
    One of my plates marked G7 was NOT one of the machined ones, so when installed my assembly was wider than it should be since without that machined first disk, it didnt go all the way in.

    [​IMG]




    This is what it looks like when it's WRONG. When put back together, the thing that pulls the clutch out is too far out also, and wont allow the clutch to be disengaged. This is where I had trouble, feeling confident that I had put the correctly labeled disks in the right order. I was wrong to trust the markings and not pay closer attention.

    [​IMG]





    This is what is looks like when you take one plate and one disk out... what I did to confirm that problem was with the spacing, not in my methods to get the cover back on correctly, which many different BMW techs were suggesting.

    [​IMG]




    Finally realizing what was going on I took it back apart, put the correct plates in, and it went back together easily.

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]





    There's one clean section on my bike!.... not for long.


    [​IMG]






    It really was a simple task, but can be screwed up like I demonstrated... it should not take someone smarter than I that pays closer attention to detail or a BMW tech more than an hour to do this. No special tools needed, just what you should have in your tool kit anyways.








    Now go wear out that clutch! :clap
    #35
    roespan likes this.
  16. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    And had some clue about the different friction discs. Especially since they came packaged separately. I didn't see the markings or the machined bits, but I don't see to good either. The shop manual does note that the solid discs go in "sharp edge in".

    I didn't even think about the tape on the shifter shaft. If my seal leaks, it will surely be a $10 part that needs a $25 gasket behind it.

    I did however check carefully and ALL 16 COVER SCREWS ARE THE SAME LENGTH. I will try to suck the torque sequence picture out of the manual, it is not what you'd expect.

    bobo
    #36
  17. Bobo1167

    Bobo1167 On a different frequency

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Auburn, WA
    I made a list of tools needed to get through a clutch change......

    2 13mm open end wrenches, or 1 13mm open end and a 6" cresent wrench (something to hold the locknut) to remove and install the clutch cable.

    E8 socket (kinda the reverse of a torx bit) or a 1/4" 6 point socket to loosen the shift lever. A clever guy would swap that E8 screw for an 8mm hex head.

    Some kinda wedge thing to spread the shift lever open a bit. A medium flat bladed screwdriver is the classic tool, a knife blade would probably work.

    Torx 45 for the footpeg mount. These are the only tight screws in the project.

    Torx 30 or an 8mm socket for the 16 left engine cover screws. They are all the same length, mix at match at your leisure.

    Torx 30 for the 6 screws holding the six springs. These are long screws.

    Some kinda skinny thing with a hook at the end to pull the discs out of the basket. I used a Harbor freight "dental" tool.

    Torque wrenches are also suggested, YMMV.
    the extensive tool kit would look like this
    [​IMG]

    If you were going to put together a care package for someone who needs to do this in a parking lot, add......

    some kinda cleaner spray stuff. WD40 would be ok. To attempt to clean the cover and engine edges of mud before doing anything else.

    a roll of paper towels to clean up that mess, and several others.

    a couple of zip ties to hold the footpeg out of the way and to not strain the kickstand switch wire.

    something to catch the couple ounces of oil that will spill when the cover comes off. Some disposable pie pans would be perfect, 1 for the dirty oil, 2 to use to soak the friction discs before assembly.

    a quart of 10/40 oil for soaking, and to replace the tiny bit that fell out.

    something to clean little bits of gasket from the cover. I used a paint scraper razor blade, a sharp knife blade would work.

    Two beers. This goes so fast, that's all you'll need.

    and the parts...........

    BMW part numbers 21 21 7 699 586 for the package of springs, friction and steel discs. it comes in a cool little box, for the price it should be made of unobtanium, and from JAPAN !!!!
    [​IMG]

    These are the parts....

    [​IMG]

    BMW part 11 11 7 707 906 gasket....

    I puzzled a bit last nite about how to identify the two different friction discs. This will be important when you get the whole mess mixed up in the oil soaking bath. The easier way to figure this out is to pile ALL the disc up and hold them this way. It is easy to FEEL the differing tang widths when they are side by side.
    [​IMG]


    One final really bad picture of the innermost steel disc, it goes in first, it's the darker colored one, and has the dimple punched in the edge. Per the shop manual, all the steel discs go in, "sharp edge in".

    [​IMG]

    To prevent any copyright issues with BMW, I made my own picture for the tightening sequence on the left engine cover. It's ChiTowns dirty engine, I put the numbers on.
    [​IMG]

    the torque values are........

    the 6 screws that hold the spings down 10NM = 7.3 Ft/lb. in a crossing pattern.

    the 16 left engine cover screws 12NM = 8.8 Ft/lb and the sequence in the picture above.

    the 2 screws for the foot peg bracket 38NM = 28 Ft/lb. I used some loctite too.

    and for the truly anal, the shift lever screw 8NM = 5.9Ft/lb

    Those are really, really low torque values. I did use a cordless drill to seat the long clutch basket spring screws. I had the drill torque set to minimum (1), that alone was nearly 10NM. Do not let anyone over-caffinated and excited touch those screws, a strong guy could wreck the aluminum clutch basket or engine case threads with one hand.
    #37
  18. GSranger

    GSranger blacksheep

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    graham, wa - near Mt. Rainier
    I would think that is your burnt up clutch material that mixed with oil, heated, and baked onto that part. "half and half" because of the oil settling when you shut off your engine.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Did you clean that material off before reassembly?
    #38
  19. Lost Roadie

    Lost Roadie Rider

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,589
    Location:
    On The Road
    Awesome Bobo! :clap

    All the little details I left out, now we might have ourselves a somewhat complete DIY...

    I don't remember having that many tools, but I'm sure you're correct. There was a hatchet involved at some point in my work. Oh, wait the was my rear output gasket on the R...

    Bolt sequence? Torque values? What are those? :wink: I used The Force.

    Also I just took the side stand off, since I long ago broke and cut off my side stand switch I didn't even think to just move it.

    If my engine lasts another 40,000 miles, the next clutch change will go fast, just like Bobo says...









    GSranger,


    Good theory, but it seemed to me like material had come off the part where it's not polished.
    Yes, it was all cleaned as good as needed.



    [​IMG]
    #39
  20. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,631
    Location:
    The great state of confusion
    Thank you Bobo! :clap

    GSRanger:

    Yeah ... I've been puzzling over that pattern...
    Bobo said that when he took his clutch apart only a few ounces of oil was lost? Would that be enough to submerge the plates in oil that is a "deep" as indicated?

    I am no sure how oil is (or is not) scavanged out of the clutch area...
    #40