800GS Charcoal Canister

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by AngryRed, Oct 5, 2008.

  1. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    Anyone ripped out the charcoal canister on their F800GS yet? Not so crazy about them to begin with especially when the bike goes sideways on the dirt and the 800's is actually zip tied to the frame :huh

    Just wondering if there are things to be aware of if I rip it out espcially with electronics.

    Thanks.
    #1
  2. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Hey you gotta admit it is better than the "fashion statement" made by the G650XCountry canister ??? :rofl

    Over on the Chain gang http://f650.com/ there is a thread on disconnecting it.... Not sure what the warranty implications might be ...

    Edit: Sorry let me clarify the append ... I don't think there is any 800GS specific info there but I was told that the "connections" to the canister are the same so that the method of removal would work on the 658/800 twins that is hear-say but probably a decent place to start...

    Jim

    Jim
    #2
  3. Monkey_Boy

    Monkey_Boy Long timer

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    The canister simply filters fume emissions from the gas tank. It does not affect engine performance one way or another. So why remove it?
    #3
  4. CrazyMike

    CrazyMike ***42***

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    Yep....
    Only issue is increasing the length of the fuel vent hose to drain to the bottom of the motorcycle. Don't forget to leave the check valve in or you could get a siphon effect.
    #4
  5. CrazyMike

    CrazyMike ***42***

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    I removed mine to be able to fit the F800GS specific ScottOiler.
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  6. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    I don't want to turn this into another "why remove it" debate thread, there are already a few of those active.

    Short answer though is so it doesn't fill with fuel or water and cause issues.
    #6
  7. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    Thanks for the info guys, I'll also check out the chain gang site, didn't think about that.
    #7
  8. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do Super Moderator

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    Got pics and/or a description of what you did? :ear
    #8
  9. CrazyMike

    CrazyMike ***42***

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    It was a pretty simple exercise. I've removed the canisters on my R1200C, R1150RT and my girlfriend's F650ST before so I used those examples as a template.

    First:
    Remove the countershaft sprocket cover (three torx screws), the two black triangular shaped covers (held on by one torx screw) on each side of the motorcycle and unbolt the rectifier (two screws) and it's mounting plate (two screws) from the frame.

    Second:
    Track all of the hoses to find out where they lead. There are four hoses:
    - Fuel Tank vent hose (this hose is actually two hoses; a short one, a long one and a check valve between them). The long hose travels under the seat to the rear of the motorcycle on the right hand side, makes a u-turn before you come to the check valve (zip tied to the rear sub-frame), then the short hose to the fuel tank.
    - Carbon Canister drain hose
    - A hose from the differential pressure switch to the canister
    - A hose from a bung between the throttle body supply to the differential pressure switch

    On the left side of the motorcycle (as viewed when sitting on the motorcycle) directly behind the cover that you removed earlier will be the differential pressure switch. Just remove the hoses and put plug caps over the open ports on the switch. Replace the cover.

    On the right side of the motorcycle, clip the zip ties and unplug any remaining hoses on top of the canister. I removed miy canister from the motorcycle through the space where the countershaft sprocket cover was removed. It's a little tight but I was still able to remove it via this space.

    At this point, you should still have one hose coming from the rear of the motorcycle (the fuel tank vent) and one hose coming from a point in the center of the motorycle behind the cylinder heads. The fuel tank vent hose is not long enough to drain to the ground so you will need to replace this hose after the check valve with sufficient length to drain to the ground. (Approximately 4 feet of hose will be necessary to route to the same point as the original drain point.) The other hose coming from the throttle bodies will need to be removed and either the bung should be capped or used for the ScottOiler (if you're going that route).

    Zip tie any loose hoses, replace the rectifer mounting plate and rectifier, and replace the remaining two covers.
    #9
  10. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    Nice... Thanks are12c.
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  11. Dieselboy

    Dieselboy Journey not Destination

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    Ok, AngryRed, now you have to follow through with pictures....
    #11
  12. jetdocX

    jetdocX Orange Curious

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    Don't forget that tampering with the emission control devices is probably illegal and will most certainly make your bike un-registerable in CA.

    Just sayin'. I know the illegal part is a lot like the matress police thing, but #2 might be a problem selling your bike to a Californian.
    #12
  13. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    Honestly Jet, I'm saying this with all due respect but I have bought and sold two dozen bikes in Ca. and never once has the DMV guy behind the counter come outside to see if my bike had a charcoal canister. Even in Nevada where I now live and vehicles are subject to inspection, bikes are exempt.

    Again I'm saying this with respect, but I'm looking for answers on actually removing the canister, not the ethical ramifications of doing so.

    Ride on my friend.
    #13
  14. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    Dieselboy my good man... er boy, when I do so I will definitely document the process!

    :clap
    #14
  15. jetdocX

    jetdocX Orange Curious

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    I have zero ethical problem with you doing so. I own a bike which has had this canister-ectomy. Previously registered in CA. What prevents them from actually checking in the future? It's really not that hard to do, right? I suggest that if you do this mod, hold on to the bits you remove so you can put them back on when/if you sell. That's all.
    #15
  16. jetdocX

    jetdocX Orange Curious

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    In fact, if I was a cash-strapped gov. entity like CA, I'd turn the CHP loose with their ticketbooks specifically targeting bikes with obviously modified emmisions control systems (this includes exhaust). Think of the money that would generate. :deal

    Ever ride through Cali? I do.
    #16
  17. AngryRed

    AngryRed Lost in Cyber Space

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    Yeah I grew up in the Palm Springs area riding HWY 74 over to San Diego and the many desert byways near Yucca Valley and Joshua Tree. I just noticed your sig says Nevada, are you a Lost Wages resident as well?

    Unless I'm crazy I remember hearing bikes in Nevada don't even require a charcoal canister. Manufacturers only install them to become 50-state legal making the bike registerable in the republic's of Kalifornia and New Yalk.
    #17
  18. Madmedic

    Madmedic Been here awhile

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    California only requires the charcoal canister on bikes with less than 7500 miles on them. More than that they don't care.
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  19. jetdocX

    jetdocX Orange Curious

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    Not Vegas. Reno, but looking at a forced move toward the Bay soon, as in before I can manage to put 7500 miles on a bike.:evil Maybe.
    #19
  20. 'Flagger

    'Flagger ..this space for rent..

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    Really!?!?!

    What's the logic behind that choice piece of rule-making?
    #20