'82 centerstand, what's the deal?

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by Bluethumb, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. Bluethumb

    Bluethumb Been here awhile

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    Just picked up a '82 R100 and it is a struggle to get up on the centerstand. I've owned '76 R90/6, a couple of r90S's, and a couple of '78 RS's and all were a breeze to rock up on the centerstand. The '82 is damn near impossible, takes a big grunt to pull it up. Plus it's almost impossible to push off. My '83 ST is a snap, but the '82 R100 is completely different. It seems as if the centerstand is too far forward when the bike's up. I can't take the rear wheel off w/o the bike collapsing. There seems to be too much weight on the back wheel.

    I talked to a BMW mechanic who has worked on lots of airheads and he said BMW redesigned the centerstand on these bikes because of complaints of them rocking off.

    I can't help but wonder if there might be something else going on. I'm going to pull off the centerstand in the next couple of days.

    Is this how the centerstands are designed on these years' bikes?
    #1
  2. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer

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    I've heard 81-83 center stands are the worst. And that the Reynolds stand came out to rectify this issue. But the Reynolds stands don't lift the rear wheel off the ground.

    I don't have a solution to you're problem, but check the pivots, and where the stand stops when bike is on it. Maybe something is worn or bent

    Good luck
    #2
  3. Bluethumb

    Bluethumb Been here awhile

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    Does anyone know if a centerstand from a different year can be swapped out?
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  4. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    That may have already happened to your bike, by a po, who put the wrong one on....just a thought.
    #4
  5. Mark Manley

    Mark Manley Long timer

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    The centre stand from a later monolever might be the solution, I have the stand from a '91 GS on my '83 G/S and it is a lot easier to use and more stable than the original.
    #5
  6. DaveBall

    DaveBall Long timer

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    I have tried several different centre stands on 81-83 R100 bikes. It seems that only the ones from those years fit properly, without any major modifications. That being said, the stops on the stock stand do wear to the point where it will end up being way to far forward. There are numerous threads and pages on the web that go into detail as to how to fix the stops. It involves welding and filling to build up the lost battered material and then grinding down enough to make it work properly again. Also, check the holes in your stand to ensure they have not gone egg shaped. And check the bushings, they are prone to wear and cracking.

    Many people have changed to the Reynolds stand, and when they want to take off a wheel, they put one or two 2x6s under the stand to get the wheels off the ground. Bit of a pain if you are away from home and need to patch a tube, but it can be done.
    #6
  7. Rob Farmer

    Rob Farmer Long timer

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    My mate has a similar issue with his 81. The original stand worked fine but cracked and buckled over the years. The replacement is slightly different but works well on later year machines so it would appear that the 81-82 machines had a unique main stand. I've just bought an 81 frame with a stand fitted so were going to put them side by side to see what the differences are.
    #7
  8. Bluethumb

    Bluethumb Been here awhile

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    I pulled the centerstand and the ends above the pivot holes are worn down and rounded over. Too bad because the rest of the stand is fine, the pivot holes, the feet, etc. regardless looks like I need a new one. Meaning a good used one. I still haven't been able to figure out if this centerstand is unique to specific years.

    Anyone out there riding a 1982 R100, R100RT or R100RS?
    #8
  9. 100RT

    100RT Long timer

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    New BMW center stand is $350 plus the small parts. I have an 81 R100RT with a Reynolds ride off stand it will also fit the 82 R100RT as long as it isnt fitted with the Nivomat shocks.
    You need stand #328 that is made for the bike. I have two small pieces of 2X4 that I use to elevate the bike when changing tires. I love the ride off especially when fully packed for tour camping.
    The number is stamped at the top flat area on the down legs.
    #9
  10. boxerboy81

    boxerboy81 Stay Horizontal

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    #10
  11. DaveBall

    DaveBall Long timer

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    Follow what ME109 did in that thread. That is the best fix you can do. It is cheaper that buying a new stand and it works perfectly.
    #11
  12. Cordless

    Cordless Two Wheel Addict

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    I bought a 1982 R100RT with a Reynolds rideoff. It doesn't elevate the rear but does work with the Nivomat shocks.

    I don't know if anything drastic was done to make the fit.

    Good Luck
    #12
  13. 100RT

    100RT Long timer

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    Cordless, my info was taken from their brochure page so it's good it is working for you. My bike didnt have the Nivo's when I bought it.
    #13
  14. Cordless

    Cordless Two Wheel Addict

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    My RT doesn't have a sidestand. I don't know if that makes any difference whether the Reynolds will fit or not. I suspect the Sidestand did disappear when the Reynolds went on.

    You installed Nivomats? I have looked at photos of hundreds of RTs and I have seen very few Nivomat shocks. Seems that most came with IKONs or that the Nivomats were replaced years ago. I don't know of anyone else who took off another brand and installed the Nivomat system.
    #14
  15. 100RT

    100RT Long timer

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    I think the Nivo's were standard equipment on the 81 RT's. From what I have read they didnt work very well. The 81 side stand was junk too. I bought a new redesigned one from Motobins a few years back
    #15
  16. Bluethumb

    Bluethumb Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the link. After examining the centerstand, it looks like the previous owner had someone weld up the ends and whoever did it butchered it. I guess it can be re-welded. I still don't get why it's so hard to get up on the stand. The bushings and pivot hole are perfect. I can see now why the stand goes too far forward, and why it's so hard to get off the stand - but not why it's do hard to lift.

    Can a different year stand be fitted. Or am I stuck with this one?

    Thanks
    #16
  17. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    Basic physics says lifting 500 lbs (?) of bike 2'' into the air is going to require some effort.
    There is a lack of appropriate leverage on an 81 c/stand, combined with lifting the bike that high.
    After all has been said regarding technique etc, etc, shortening the c/stand will make a big difference in lessening the effort required.
    Shortening the c/stand will also reduce the ability of the stand to be used in softer terrains..........as well as making it difficult to remove your wheels.

    Does your stand have the little square plate on the end where your foot is meant to be placed when deploying the stand?
    #17
  18. Bluethumb

    Bluethumb Been here awhile

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    No, my stand does not have the square pad at the end of the foot. It looks just like the typical stand with curved feet with the rubber bumpers, and a cross support where the two springs mount. The only easily identifiable difference between this stand and others on my past airheads is how the springs attach. On this one they attach to a 21/2 ( or there abouts ) steel plate and that plate is hooked to the frame. That's also how it shows in the parts fiche. On all other stands I've seen, the springs hook directly to the frame. The only other difference is the tang coming off the side is longer.

    On the G/S's and GS that I owned, I'd section one inch out of the centerstand, shortening it. This made it to where it took almost no effort to rock the bike up on the stand. It still kept the front wheel off the ground by 1/2 inch, allowing the tires to be removed if necessary. I did that for the reason mentioned, getting a 500 lb bike two inches into the air. On GS's it seemed even more.

    I've never had a basic airhead that was so difficult.
    #18
  19. DaveBall

    DaveBall Long timer

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    ME109,
    You don't "lift" the bike up onto the stand. If you do, you will always have difficulties and possibly ruin your back.

    You roll the bike backwards onto the stand.
    1. Press stand down to ground.
    2. Move left foot to press down on the stand's foot - NOT the tang.
    3. With left hand on handlebars and right hand on the grab handle - with a slight upwards tug you roll the bike backwards and up onto the stand.

    Some people actually will start the process about a foot ahead of where they want the bike to sit, just so they can get a slight rolling start.

    It seems simple, and most people have problems putting the concept into practice. But once you get it to work properly for you, it really isn't all that hard, unless the stand is knackered.
    #19
  20. chasbmw

    chasbmw Long timer

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    True ......but not all BMWs are equal........my 90/6 is really easy to get onto the stand, but my 82 even after reworking the stand and the frame remains difficult
    #20