'86 Interceptor 750?

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by danielcut, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. danielcut

    danielcut Adventurer

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    I have the option to pick up an '86 Honda Interceptor 750. I'm still working on an '80 CB750 and wasn't really looking for another project but the price is pretty unbeatable. I'm basically looking for opinions on the bike. I don't know a ton about them. I've been scouring the net but there seems to be pretty limited info on them. Apparently they were fairly rare in the states in the 750 orientation. It's in fairly rough shape but I'm told it runs.

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

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    vfrworld.com

    awesome motor, nothing sounds like gear driven cams:D
    #2
  3. 2Wheels4Soul

    2Wheels4Soul Been here awhile

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    I'm a Sconnie
    Bought one brand new in 86....loved it. I had it for 4-5 years and put on 25,000 miles. Loved it so much, I bought another VFR in 2002. Great motor.
    #3
  4. danielcut

    danielcut Adventurer

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I picked it up this morning. It's pretty beat up but I only paid $100 for it and it had a title so I'm satisfied. It'll be a slow work in progress but hopefully I can make something decent out of it.

    Side note: Does anyone know why people feel they have to do that with a rattle can? I bought a '94 CBR600 with the same thing done to it. How hard is it to just mask something off?
    #4
  5. dentvet

    dentvet Long timer

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    $100 well spent. Are you sure its a 750? I think the 750 had gold calipers or something. The 700 was more common, i had a couple, first a RWB 700 then a pearl white 700. Nice steady wail as they climb in the RPMs. I bought the first one wrecked and the guy selling it swore that you could balance a nickel on its edge on the engine case as you revved it to the moon. Maybe an official honda promo/propaganda? Funny the things you remember sometimes. I still have the matching Freddie Spencer Aria helmet, thinks its still any good?
    #5
  6. danielcut

    danielcut Adventurer

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    I'd heard the 700s were more common. Tariff busters. Not 100% sure on it being a 750, just what I was told by the guy I bought it from. I'm curious now, I'll have to check it out tomorrow and see what I can find out. Is there any real difference in the models other than engine size?
    #6
  7. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    IIRC there was an issue with valve guides leaking and the motors smoking a lot, I guess you'll find out when you start it!
    #7
  8. motomike14

    motomike14 Thumper Crusader

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  9. danielcut

    danielcut Adventurer

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    Confirmed on the VIN plate that it is in fact a 750. I've put off starting work on it for now because we will be moving soon and I'd rather move the full bike than a frame and boxes of parts. That and I'm not even sure where to start...
    #9
  10. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    You can start just by looking at how hard it is to remove the carbs for a cleaning. I know had a Sabre....same design. My friend just picked up one of them Sabres.....I looked again just for old times sake.:eek1 His runs but not that well. Will be sitting for a few days with carbs full of Seafoam just in case that works and we don't have to remove them.:eek1

    If you are crafty and like working in tight places with bent tools, you may be able to do as we did. Remove one of the bottom carb covers and inspect,left rear was the easier one. Then assess the amount of crap that may be in there. That one wasn't too bad....no grits so we are trying the Seafoam, just in case that works. I hope we get the "Miracle in that can". Phew....will know next Tuesday.:wink:
    #10
  11. pjm204

    pjm204 Long timer

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    I also had a sabre, wow did those carbs suck to work on. Avoid removing them at all costs!
    #11
  12. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I've worked on a lot of V4 Hondas and if the bike is in as rough a shape as it looks, your chances of getting the carbs to work acceptably without removing them is essentially zero. They're difficult to remove and more difficult to put back on but you probably need to bite the bullet and do the deed.

    The keys to getting them back on without too much cussing:

    + get the rubber boots as pliable as you possibly can by soaking in very hot water and/or use new ones
    + leave the hose clamps off all-together if you have to - even loosened, then can add stiffness to the boots that make it more difficult to seat the carbs; its tough to fish them in after the carbs are seated, but it can be done
    + don't be afraid to use considerable force

    As I recall, it works best to first seat the front boots, then the back.

    This is a very cool bike, but make an overall assessment of what is likely to need replacement to make it acceptable to you before you sink too much money into it. If too far gone, it is uneconomical to bring a bike like this back and it is better to punt and disassemble/sell for parts. This one looks like it would be totally uneconomical to bring back to stock but it could possibly be made into a decent runner. Early Honda V4 parts are quite valuable.

    - Mark
    #12
  13. moparren

    moparren Been here awhile

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    I've got a VF1000R project going. Gotta add on about getting the carbs off and on is a pain. Make sure the bike is well suported when you go to beat the carbs back into position.

    But that sound...:drif
    #13
  14. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    Cool bike, way advanced for that vintage. Generally a pain to work on, generally very high quality build. Cams were known to wear, probably due to marginal oiling to the cams and maybe partially due to soft metal used to make the cam. Check the lobe heights.
    #14
  15. YOUNZ

    YOUNZ Been here awhile

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    It required three cans of Sea Foam to clean my carbs that were not run in twenty years. But it worked.
    #15
  16. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    This is a VFR, not a VF, and the premature cam wear problem was generally solved with the VFR. Not that they couldn't be an issue on any bike like this, of course.

    - Mark
    #16
  17. danielcut

    danielcut Adventurer

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    As stated before, it would be far too costly to really "restore" a bike like this to its former glory. However, it may be a nice bike to at least get up and running and made into something at least rideable. Just looking at the carbs let's me know it's going to be a pain to work on them but judging by the shape of the bike I'm 99% sure that the carbs will have to come off. Though for the time being I will try letting some seafoam sit in them. I'm hoping we'll be done moving next weekend and I'll have the chance to tear it down a little more and see what I'm actually working with and if it's even worth working on.
    #17
  18. limeymike

    limeymike Who Me?

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    Pull the top covers and check the cams for wear. This would be the point at which the decision is made for me to continue spending money or not.
    #18
  19. smack doogle

    smack doogle Been here awhile

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    Have fun. The 86 VFR 750 and 700s was the beginning of the strong cams so you should have nothing to worry about with the engine assuming the oil and filter was changed on a regular basis.

    Don't worry about the carbs. Just make sure you keep them together on the plate and don't seperate them. A trick to putting them back on easy in about 5 minutes. Use a hair dryer on the intake boots (get them warm and a lil soft and us some vaseline. They'll slide right on first try. You can also just buy some new rubber boots too.

    I would love to find a deal like that. My '86 took a little bit of work to make it into what it is but not to much since it was in great shape when I got it. (My VF1000r is now gone to California)

    Here's a pic of mine. Feel free to copy :)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    For fun, here is my '93 I bought for $250. Not as good a deal as yours but not bad but it had been sitting in someones yard for 5 years. It took some work for sure. Again, the carbs were just cleaned and she fired up.

    when I brought her home
    [​IMG]


    How she sits after 6 months of work and about $1200 thrown at it.

    [​IMG]


    There's your motivation!!!!! Get to work!!!!!!! (post pics of progress please)
    #19
  20. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    Totally jealous. :clap
    #20