88 GS100 vs 91 GS100PD

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by KneeDrachen, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    Gang, i'm back in the realm of airheads after selling my 1986 R80RT that Ii only owned briefly (yes i've been smitten by the airhead bug) and i'm trying to decide between two bikes. I'm doing my research but can't seem to find much in the way of the difference between the 1988 r100GS and the 1991 r100GSPD. I know there are some differences such as the bodywork, fuel tank etc, but as far as mechanicals, anything significant? Circilip transmission, etc? Any help would be appreciated.
    Alex
    #1
  2. miltonp

    miltonp n00b+28k

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    I was hoping someone else would speak up since I believe my '91 may be the one you are considering. I will try to be unbiased though.:wink:

    i got the following changes in 1990 from:

    http://www.micapeak.com/bmw/gs/gs_para.html#R100PD

    • the bigger oilpan bash plate;
    • the rectangular headlight in the windscreen fairing with roo-bars;
    • new (regarding the precedent PD version) movable (you can adjust the angle) "rectangular" windshield;
    • a digital clock placed in the middel of the bar clamps is available as accessory;
    • the standard accessory socket;
    • the K-style controls;
    • the weight : 215 and 220 kg;
    • the choice of an high or low front fender.
    The changes were not drastic. The big decision is whether to go with a standard GS or a PD. If you are going to stay local and play in the dirt you may want to go with a lighter GS. If you want to hit the open road alone and don't want to have to plan your course based on the next gas station then the PD is a great choice. If you ride mostly in groups the extra fuel capacity won't mean as much. You can buy a larger tank for the standard GS. I never rode a standard GS so I don't know if they feel less top-heavy on a full tank. Mine never bothered me and I love the dual reserve tank design.

    When I bought my bike, I knew I wanted to visit my sister in the mountains in Colorado so the GS bikes rose to the top of my list. I had a choice between a Red/White '92 GS and my '91 Teal/Black PD. The red/white combo looked too much like a dirt bike and I really liked the Teal and the Paris Dakar graphic which BMW lost the rights to use in '92. Choice made. I don't think you will regret any GS purchase.
    #2
  3. bereahorn

    bereahorn Long timer

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    I had an '88GS which I sold last Summer and presently own a '92 GDPD which is Teal and Black. I think the circlip issue exists on both years if I remember correctly. You might have a look at Snowbum's site and see if he mentions it.
    http://pweb.jps.net/~snowbum/
    #3
  4. Mugwest

    Mugwest .

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    I'll point out some obvervations that no one seems to have picked up on:

    i started out with the stock 88-90 'number plate' screen on the G/S, and found that life was quite good off-road:
    [​IMG]

    i then wanted to try the 90-95 roo-bar fairing, hoping to get more wind protection and a real tachometer:

    [​IMG]


    the discovery here was that the weight diff b/t that little number plate windscreen and the full roo bar fairing was very little: i weighed all the removed components of the original setup ( headlight, instrument panel, windscreen) and the overall weight gain of the roo-bar setup was a mere 10 pounds or so heavier.

    BUTT... there's magic to be gained in getting all that weight of headlamp/panel/screen off of the fork/triple tree: i find the handling lighter (and better off-road) without all that flopping mass of headlight etc swinging on the bars-- especially offroad. I may be packing 10 extra pounds on my already weak G/S forks, but the reward is that my sand-handling is actually easier, b/c there's no mass on the bars anymore. The downside is that a heavy crash risks tweaking an expensive, hard-to-straighten roo-bar. So i make it a point not to crash. Better bikes for that.
    #4
  5. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    Thanks for the replies...I guess my biggest concern is this. I searched and can't seem to find an answer for this, which is the driveshaft failure. Is it 30k miles? 50k miles? Or is it really a case by case basis? I understand that unladen bikes had odd angles on the driveshaft which I *believe* made them heat up and destruct. But is there an actual life expectancy or is there no way to tell? I read that you can get an idea if the driveshaft is on its way out by placing the bike on its centerstand and rotating the rear wheel backwards, if you hear a clicking, it is pretty much shot. Other than that, there's nothing else diagnostically to do?
    #5
  6. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    drive shaft failure statistics:

    http://www.roadkill.com/~davet/moto/driveshaftfail.html
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  7. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    Stagehand- With those statistics, it seems that the odds aren't that bad. . .just that every bike I'm looking at is right at the average mileage for failure:eek1
    #7
  8. elmoreman

    elmoreman takin' a break, boss

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    the driveshaft issue has been covered ad nauseum here and other places. It seems that they, in reality, last 35-50,000 miles in general, but they can also be modded to include greaseable zerks and a different strength polymer(?) which helps to keep the u-joints from going out of phase. Some people use an outfit called Burno's others use Eric Demant, and some people do a homemade repair. At one point there was someone associated with airheads making a CV U-Joint, but that project stalled due to funding.

    Its not an incredible expensive fix when it goes, it usually provides some warning in the way of noise and notchiness, and it costs less to fix than many of the farkles people put on their bikes (lights, luggage, oversize tank, Touratech gear, etc.)

    I had a 90PD, and went to an 84 g/s. Ive noticed a tremendous difference in handling and ease of use--I ride 50/50 dirt road and pavement. The PD is really a road/wide open spaces bike with good suspension, the GS is a little more suited to light duty fireroad work, and the g/s even more so with some singletrack thrown in.
    #8
  9. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    Well thank you for putting my mind at ease...After reading some of the threads and doing some research it was nerve wracking. There's a few bikes I'm looking at, all are pretty much equidistant from me. Thank you for the input as to the differences between the PD the the GS, now its just a matter of shopping...
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  10. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    well, its painful to have happen, true. Not the end of the world, though. Usually an excellent reason to go touch all those things you have no other reason to go get to. If you take it to a dealer, it will probably run you close to $1k. the Drive shaft brand new is $600, so anything you can do yourself is money in your pocket.

    Mine went right at 70K. I caught it before the U joints shredded. I got a new one installed, and gave the used one to an inmate here...
    Next time it goes (?) I'm going to try this:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2567649
    #10
  11. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    very nice and an excellent resource to utilize for replacement, I'm surprised more people aren't doing something similar. My local BMW shop does work on airheads but they do some screwy stuff or at least try to work the customer over for $. Once I bought my RT, I brought it to my local dealership to be looked over and it had pushrod tube seals that were beginning to get wet. I wouldn't even say weep, just getting wet. They told me they'd need to pull the engine out, yes the engine out in order to replace them!:rofl I hadn't joined airheads yet, nor BMWMOA yet, nor started hanging out here yet, but I figured just by looking at the design of the engine that it wouldn't be required. When I end up with a GS (because it will happen this year, just a matter of time of finding the right one) the driveshaft replacement will be done by me, not them. I can't imagine it is too hard of a procedure, but then again I haven't read up on it so I can't comment. It seems do-able, because of the reading I'm doing, the majority of owners seemed to have done it themselves...
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  12. WooPig

    WooPig Gravel Traveler

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    Find the bike, know your stuff, then use that knowledge to negotiate enough of a price break to do the driveshaft repair? Oh, and HPMGuy's product and service are great. Good luck!
    #12
  13. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    good advice woo. One bike is currently owned by a BMW master mechanic, the thing that bothers me is that he is the 3rd owner. 3 owners since 1988? That seems like it would have led a hard life? I typically don't buy bikes from more than that first owner, but maybe this will be different, who knows. The others I am getting details soon.
    #13
  14. bykpimp

    bykpimp Live and let ride

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  15. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen MORE COWBELL!!!

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    thanks for the lead...
    #15