990 Adventure forks...

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by cleefurd, Apr 8, 2012.

  1. cleefurd

    cleefurd n00b

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    #1
  2. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Jerkus Maximus

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    Yeah, heavier springs will make a big difference...a re-valve will also go a long ways towards helping the big girl keep her head up. She tends to blow right through the first few inches of travel, and that's all valving. It's fixable, though.

    New bushings and seals would be wise as well, considering what you're planning on doing. :eek1

    Spring? Heavy...real heavy - 6.0 or better, I'd think.
    #2
  3. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

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    IMHO - (for those taking the behemoth off-road) a re-valve and re-spring is absolutely necessary.
    I'm <175lbs, and went from the stock .49s to .60, redid (all) the valves, and replaced the stock seals with SKFs. Well worth it, and one of the best mods you can do for this bike.
    No more diving, front and rear move as one now, and she feels tight !
    #3
  4. slackmeyer

    slackmeyer Don't mean sheeit. .

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    Not much in the way of special tools needed for these forks. Maybe a pin wrench for the top, and a way to hold the rebound damping rod in a vise without damaging it (i.e., a piece of wood or stiff rubber with a hole drilled in it, and then cut in half). A seal driver is the only other thing I can think of, that can be made from a piece of pvc pipe or a pvc coupling. Lots of people work on their own forks, look around a bit.

    Also, I see no reason to replace seals and bushings before their time: my original seals are still working fine at 57k.
    #4
  5. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

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    - while the stock KTM seals (NOK on newer models) are of decent quality, replacing the seals can significantly improve/minimize stiction, as well as better protect the fork (ie: SKFs have a double seal vs the stock single, etc...)

    When replacing my seals, I felt the difference (in resistance) between the NOK and SKF seals, and it was significant.
    #5
  6. Konflict Motorsports

    Konflict Motorsports KM TUNER

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    Quality seals, polishing of the lower, correct springs I'd say .64kg to .67kg depending where you are riding, and what type of rider you are, and a revalve to get the best performance. These have a mid-stroke harshness that needs to be addressed with modifying the midstroke tap, and valving changes.
    There is no need for replacing the cartridges on these forks, they are high quality, and with some tweaking of the piston's, polishing, skf seals, and valving changes you wouldn't believe the transformation unless you were to ride one that has been modified.
    Theres a saying in the suspension world: You dont know good suspension, until you ride it!
    #6
  7. GZERO

    GZERO Fixing stuff around

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    There's the other saying that i think is really bang on!

    "The best you ridden is the best you know"
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  8. GZERO

    GZERO Fixing stuff around

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    The forks that come with the Adventures (in all the travels they offer) are top notch components, ones that if you want to buy off the shelf for other bikes would come in the range between $1.000 to 2.000, so believe me, is not cheap in any respect.

    Good luck with your desition.
    Altough i would have recommend to you superplush, i don't have it, but many people talk real good about it.
    They also have a lot of knowledge with KTM suspension and can even modify the travel in your suspension.
    #8
  9. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

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    Not sure why you're being given such high prices - I bought my .64 springs from KTMtwins, had one of our local suspension gurus (http://www.rmrsuspensions.com/) do a full fork service (clean, polish, fresh oil, etc...), replace the stock seals with SKFs, and rebuild the valves - all for under $500 !
    #9
  10. GZERO

    GZERO Fixing stuff around

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    Yes, the best you can do is send the forks and the shock and have all of them revalved, serviced and re-sprung to your specs, i bet the end result will be where you want it to be.
    And if you want the extra travel, then yes, they have all those solutions. I also think their prices are right where they should be.
    #10
  11. GZERO

    GZERO Fixing stuff around

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    Superplush quoted me 750 for both the forks and shock without modifying the travel (i'm 2004, so i have more than enough).
    so, that would be around 375 for the forks, so it's around the price you said.
    #11
  12. GZERO

    GZERO Fixing stuff around

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    lol, no, they won't.
    But the best would be for you to call james tomorrow and ask him your questions.
    you'll get better answers
    #12
  13. syzygy9

    syzygy9 Been here awhile

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    I think 'cleefurd's account has been hacked.
    #13
  14. enduronoob

    enduronoob n00b

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    greetings first post here...have a philosophical question...
    why would a company like ktm make a bike with forks that dont work well?
    so many test hours and engineers with race xp just didnt see what you guys all complain about?:eek1
    #14
  15. kaptinkaos

    kaptinkaos Just some nOOb

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    The bike isn't built as a race bike. It's not custom. It's a production one-size-fits all. Every rider is different and every terrain a rider rides is varied. Custom tuning on a bike applies to everything from a seat to bars and of course, suspension. It's not that KTM ignores this, it's just that KTM isn't manufacturing a custom off road race bike tailored to each rider. They are providing a platform, ;)
    #15
  16. Katoom72

    Katoom72 Been here awhile

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    how many bikes did u had that where perfect suspensionwise off the showroom floor? These forks work well for moderate use and the moderate user. Ppl that like to push it a bit harder hit the ceiling on the std setup. Just like anyone that rides a R1 hard, same thing applies. Those breaks and forks are even worse looking at what the bike expresses -> go fast and push limits.
    #16
  17. enduronoob

    enduronoob n00b

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    sound reasonable never thought of it that way...maybe my skills are not pushing the bikes limit then. however i think that the stock setup is very good for riding fast on poor quality tarmac. all these bikes with tight suspension i follow sometimes brake and reduce their lean as soon i they see holes and dirt on the road and i just fly past them
    #17
  18. kaptinkaos

    kaptinkaos Just some nOOb

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    Lol, yes. The 990 stock suspension will handle anything tarmac.
    #18
  19. renogeorge

    renogeorge Let's ride!!

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    I have had many modern KTMs and Japaese dirt and street bikes with highly adjustable suspension; and many older less/non adjustable going back to old Triumphs, Huslys, Bultacos--you name it.

    IMHO, many guys don't use all the options available to them before spending the big $ on re valving. I would suggest 3 steps:

    1) Get the right springs for your weight and set ride height/sag
    2) Be sure seals and oil are fresh
    3) FULLY experiment with the full range of adjustments available to you--all 40+ settings on compression and rebound

    After going through all of that, you may still find that the stock components don't work for you. Then go with the revalve.

    A lot of guys won't/wouldn't do the work to jet a carbureated bike properly. They want someone to give them THE hot jetting setup on a silver platter. Same thing with suspension. As an admitted tinkererer, I see a lot of enjoyment being missed by just sending $ and getting the T shirt/sticker to show how savvy you are. I do get the fact that many "just want to ride".

    FWIW and down off the soapbox
    #19
  20. turdfergeson

    turdfergeson Taco Slayer

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    Just 1, the Y2K Honda CR250.
    I read through this thread researching fork adjustment for the 990 Baja and I'd put myself in the "push it bit harder" category. (insert "that's what she said" joke) but there was a post earlier about how bad the bike likes to dive.(feels like I'm about to endo in a 3rd gear sand wash turn going from 3/4 throttle to 1/2) This bugs the shit out of me. I'm 185lbs, I ride hard in desert/Baja terrain but suspension is one area I've never had to work on and I'm curious to see if the stiffer springs are worth installing on a bike with 2200mi or if the stock forks can really be adjusted to help the front end diving. I've tested a few adjustments based on what the owners manual documents but I really didn't notice a difference. Suspension work for me is really the Final Frontier as far as DIY bike maintenance.
    #20