A couple questions for LEOs

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by 390beretta, Dec 15, 2012.

  1. SenorBoludo

    SenorBoludo n00b

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    I got stopped in Alaska on route 1 a bit south of Tok going about 70 in what I thought was a 65. The cop, a really young guy no older than 26, was very friendly and asked if I knew how fast I was going. I said "sure, 70 mph", thinking I was well within reason on a 65mph road. He then asked if I knew it was 55mph on the road, which I honestly didn't. I looked startled, and said I must have missed the sign, and asked for how long it had been 55. "Oh, about the last 100 miles since just outside of Glenallen." Luckily, he was a nice guy, and gave me a ticket for 60 in a 55 and explained how to get the points taken off.

    As he was leaving, he told me that I should be careful because there was a big moose that had been hanging out right by the road up ahead aways, and he didn't want me to hit it. I spent the next 30 miles riding carefully, watching out for that moose, before I realized that he must be back chuckling in his squad car about the "moose" he warns out-of-state motorcyclists about to get them to slow down.

    (worst part about the whole thing, I had chatted briefly with a nice HD rider in Glenallen earlier that day who said to take it really easy on that road, because there were two state troopers who worked the exact stretch of road I got popped on. Shortly after trooper #1 stopped me, I saw his buddy Trooper #2, just like the HD gentleman had said).
    #61
  2. Tim

    Tim Long timer

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    I was a LEO for 15 years, moto-cop for eight of them. My usual "rules" were no action for up to 5 mph over the limit, between 5 and 10 mph over would get a written warning and over 10 would get reported for Court.

    What would get me to change my "rules" were driving stupid, driver attitude and vehicle faults. If I stopped someone for speeding and then found a bald tyre (tire), no horn, defective lights etc etc etc then I'd take action on all of the offences disclosed.

    I could also change my "rules" to the drivers advantage (as frequently mentioned already) as a result of good, polite and friendly driver attitude, a well maintained vehicle and in the case of motorcyclists, a well equipped rider.

    But that was almost 14 years ago now.

    [​IMG]
    #62
  3. BigDoc

    BigDoc Been here awhile

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    I have over 1,000,000 miles in the saddle; so I have lots of stories. The latest came this past summer on my way to the BMWMOA in Sedalia, Missouri. It was 4:00 AM on I-77 in Virginia. I spotted a group of cars about 5 miles ahead of me and I decided that because of all the deer, it was safer to be in a pack instead of alone. I nailed my bike and was catching the pack when I blew by a parked HP running radar. I knew I was toast, so I grabbed brakes and pulled over. I had my top case open getting my wallet and registration when he spotted my antique Colt Peacemaker. A gun conversation was followed by a warning to slow down because all the area cops would be on the highway waiting for their shifts to end. He never told me my speed; but I know it was over 100. Of course I was geared up and I am old enough to have been his grandfather; but I don't think that had much to do with it.
    #63
  4. GlennR

    GlennR Playin' in the Fire

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    After reading this thread it seems LEOs generally love guns, and legally carrying one is a "friendly icebreaker". It gives you a common bond, which seems crazy since guns are dangerous, but all Cops are trained with guns & use them everyday. It is part of their "identity", just like motorcycles are our common bond here.
    #64
  5. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Around here, I suspect its different, as all the cars now have camera's recording stops, and they even have tag readers that will pull all your info before a stop.
    High tech.
    Since NO ONE who gets pulled over gets a warning, I suspect there is someone reviewing stops and they may cause grief for any officer who does not write a ticket during a stop.

    It may be a lost fine that drives it, or they want to show productivity, but I suspect its about money.

    A town may write 10 tickets a day (a VERY LOW guess), 365 days a year, average fine $200.00 (also VERY LOW), that equals $730,000.00 a year.
    If you plead down to a non points ticket, the township gets to keep all the money.
    If its points, some money goes to the state and dare.

    Within 50 miles of my house, there are likely 10,000 police, every small town has at least 4 or 5, some have 20 or 40, all looking to be productive in the time of budget cuts.
    Then there are the red light camera's, the surprise inspection checkpoints, etc.

    Off duty officers can get your tag and mail you tickets, and there are a lot of un marked police cars.
    #65
  6. cliffy109

    cliffy109 Long timer

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    I should have got a ticket on Saturday. I was on a road near my house that is marked at 45. It is a new road and it is well known that once the final top-coat is applied in the Spring that the limit will be moved to 55. Well, until then, the local constabulary is making the most of the revenue opportunity. They set up in a driveway with two cars and using a mailbox to steady the radar gun. When I saw them, I checked my speedo and was on my way down from 60.

    I waved my index finger as I passed them and got a nod in return. I really think they see a guy on a BMW with full gear as a different kind of situation. I'm not foolish enough to think I'm immune but I keep seeing evidence that they just don't bother with ATGATT riders on anything resembling a long distance touring bike.
    #66
  7. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I think its more likely they thought you could afford a good attorney.


    #67
  8. cliffy109

    cliffy109 Long timer

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    LOL. Well, if that's the case, you better not tip them off that I couldn't afford that. Hahahaha
    #68
  9. GoGo Gadget

    GoGo Gadget Long timer

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    More likely you were under "their" limit and on the way down so why bother.
    #69
  10. 390beretta

    390beretta Long timer

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    I didn't realize there would be so much interest in this thread when I posted it. Really appreciate everyone's responses, I've learned a bit and I'm guessing other have also. The one thing I am puzzled about seems to be the belief that officers on "traffic duty" will tend to ticket everyone, cagers and bikers alike, sort of "at the drop of a hat". That hasn't been my experience. If you'll look at one of my earlier posts about being clocked at 40-45 in a 25, you'll see what I mean. That officer, I'm sure, was on traffic duty and he couldn't have been more lenient.
    #70