A Hell of a Ride - A military retiree meets the country he defended.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Setanta ADV, Nov 14, 2017.

  1. HeliMark

    HeliMark Been here awhile

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    Wow, thanks for that. My youngest daughter, who is just finishing her masters degree in anthropology, and I have had some long discussions on subjects of one part of the country (city) being condescending and/or trying to change another part of the country (rural/boonies:lol3). She is very much in agreement with what you have said (as I), and gets frustrated with professors that want "to change the world". We have had the same talk about other countries, but I do not want to hijack your great thread, and also want to stay away from getting this booted to CSM.

    Mark
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  2. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    It's a common thing to think of another country who is an opponent as "the enemy". If they are the enemy, then it stands to reason that they are not like you and must be sub-human. In order to fight in a large scale conflict, they have to be, right? Who would want to fight people who are just like you? That would be like fighting your own family. The same thing is happening in American politics now, only it's bled out into the public.

    I see you're from Russia. 21 years ago, I was in Bosnia, helping to stop a terrible war that was turning people into animals. Alongside us was the Russian Army. For a time, we were at the same large base together. Some of the Russians decided they would help us learn Russian, and so began a language class with an American teacher who also spoke Russian. This is from Google translate, but all these years later, I still remember the phrase "

    Привет мой друг
    Privet moy drug" although I remember it being "drug moy".

    I grew up in Alaska during the Cold War, at the height of nuclear tensions. We would see Russian bombers being escorted away from Alaskan airspace on our local news programs. As a child, I was afraid of Russians. Oddly enough, it was in another war zone where I learned to see the Russian people for what they were; "People", just like me.

    ~Manny
  3. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    Thanks. I'm assuming that's some sort of ride report purgatory. :-) These thoughts are all associated with the ride though. This story is about people; about all of us. I went out, seeking what it meant to be an American today. I didn't have the time to stay in each location long enough to really soak in the character of each individual community. The fleeting glances I was able to see, put together, form a sort of mosaic image of our nation that I hope resonates.

    I really don't want anybody to infer that this discussion or report is political. It isn't. It's actually the opposite of being political. It's my hope that people in this country can get step away from political positioning and just communicate with each other as equals again. For those who may counter that point by saying "But that's never happened", then let's make it so, starting with yourself, the one person you do have control over.

    Thanks for the input. I'm really happy to hear the feedback. This was a special experience for me, and seems some of you are getting same feeling through these words. High complements indeed.

    Best,
    ~ Manny
  4. crashkorolyk

    crashkorolyk just happy to ride

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    Just caught up with your brilliant R.R. and adventures,thanks for sharing,although I wore green for many years in a different country,can still relate to your great observations about life across America.I spend a fair amount of time there and have many close friends in your great country,I hope people take a deep breath a chill out,and like you`ve said,listen to all sides.Looking forward to the rest of your trip,stay safe,and see you out on the road!
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  5. Scotty707

    Scotty707 Been here awhile

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    Thank you for your service.
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  6. chudzikb

    chudzikb Been here awhile

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    Wow, just wow, keep doing what you are doing as it is rather insightful. Haters will be haters, I have become very quick to "agree to disagree" of late, it is the strategy!
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  7. Jeffk185

    Jeffk185 Adventurer

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    Keep up the good work Manny! Your reply made be laugh, and by not taking the bait from an internet troll. Most people wouldn't have the character to let those toxic comments just roll off their back like you did.

    Stay safe, keep on riding and writing.
  8. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    I see what you did there. :imaposer
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  9. KHVol

    KHVol Long timer

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    Thank goodness there a few people who are willing to sign up to defend our country and our people because there are a lot of people who would be more than willing to take it all from us. I don’t understand all the hate some people have for our country when it would be so easy for them to leave. Glad you are proud.
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  10. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    Here we go -

    A Hell of a Ride – 17

    Day 16, 13 September 2017


    Today was going to be a special day. While most destinations to this point had been random, or chosen because someone I knew made a suggestion to come check out their back yard, this day’s destination held personal significance for me. I was heading to the town of Burlington, in Coffey County, Kansas. Why? What’s in Kansas? Well, despite what people might gather from my heritage, based on my name, part of my family originated from that area. Around the time of prohibition and the Great Depression, in American history, my Great Grandfather was the mayor of this small town in the middle of the USA. Like many other families of that time and location, he later migrated Westward during the “Dustbowl” era. Life was extremely hard back then, but Burlington persisted. I had heard tales of this place during my childhood. Of the family trekking back along Route 66, reuniting with the Kansas side of the family. I’m told that several features of the town, created during the time of my Great Grandfather, continue to exist, and are used by the community to this day.

    In preparation of the visit, I had planned to visit the Coffey County Museum there in Burlington. I wouldn’t be staying there long, so I was hoping that someone at the museum might be able to shed some light on the history of the town for me. Some time, somewhere yesterday, I had placed a call to the museum and spoke to a woman there, in an effort to prepare for the visit. She asked the name of my Great Grandfather and told me she would do some research and see if they couldn’t find anything out about him. I was greatly appreciative of the offer and said goodbye, until tomorrow. Today was “tomorrow.

    Crawling out of bed, I barely managed to make the “complimentary” breakfast hours of the hotel. I had been to a few “budget” chain hotels at this point. Their breakfast offerings were all almost identical. This one just had… less. No matter. I did what limited damage I could do to their food stocks, and made my way around the corner to my room, ready to pack. This would be one of the easier packing jobs I would have on this trip. Rexy was literally right outside my door. A memory flashed back in my mind. “So was all the construction debris, and those nails.” About that…

    Out I went to inspect my tires, with a fine-tooth comb. The parking spot I had chosen in the dark now showed itself to be littered with roofing nails. I went about picking up the ones I could find, making my count probably over 20 in that small space. Amazingly, despite maneuvering the superbike around late at night, in complete ignorance of the minefield I was treading on, not a single nail had punctured my tires! That was a good enough omen for me. Today was going to be a good day!

    MO 13 Sep 2017 - MO - Carthage MO sun reflection.jpg

    Checked out, I assumed the position, and moved back out onto the road. Before long, I passed just North of Joplin, MO, the city that was devastated by an EF5 tornado back in 2011. The tornado’s 200 MPH+ winds resulted in $3 Billion in damage, making this event the costliest tornado in U.S. history. Even worse than the property damage was the human toll; 1,150 injuries and 158 killed, as a direct result of the tornado itself. Since that terrible day, Joplin has been a model for the rest of the nation, for coming together as a community and healing from this tragedy.

    Today, there wouldn’t be any Interstate Freeway riding. The entire ride would take place on US Highways, State Highways, and a few backroads, routing me around several areas blocked off for construction. I was essentially riding into an area of the U.S. that the majority of the country drives around or flies over. I was looking forward to seeing this part of the country.

    Thanks to the all-nighter I pulled yesterday, and the extra miles I gained in prepositioning, the ride today was projected to only be about 140 miles. Following the navigation app that I was using, I couldn’t help but notice the multitude of signs on the road saying “Road closed. Detour Ahead 6 miles” was not reflected in the instructions I was being given by my phone. “Ah Hell, what do I have to lose – time?” I figured whatever happened, the worst thing I would have to do was turn around and backtrack a few miles. This decision turned out to be important for what I didn’t see. I was using a popular navigation app that works off of user feedback to let others know the situation and condition of the roads. I imagine that people in this area just weren’t using the app and the road status couldn’t be updated. Was the road really closed, or were the signs just left behind, as sometimes happens? Six miles down the two lane road, I had my answer. Definitely closed. Ok, that settles that question. “What do I do now?”, I asked myself. Consulting my app again, I had the unusual honor of being the first person to mark a road closed. The system automatically re-routed me toward my destination. Take a Right, the next Left, another left after that, and a Right, back onto the highway. No worries.

    Slight worries. The road I turned onto was narrow and roughly paved, with no lines painted on it. A worry I had, with such a overloaded, unbalanced bike, began to creep from the back of my head to the front; “Is the road going to get worse?”, as well as “Where is this taking me”? I had been passing a few houses along the highway, as is typical in the country. I had a few houses and trailers around me now. I was completely surprised when, after taking my left, a town seemingly appeared out of nowhere. At the time, I was too focused on getting back on the road and arriving at my destination, to have considered exploring this place a bit. I wish now that I had taken that time. At this moment, I didn’t even know what state I was in (I had crossed the Kansas State line some 10 miles back and hadn’t realized it). Passing through, something immediately seemed off about the place. Crossing the train tracks, and pulling up to the very first intersection, it hit me; there in nobody moving out here… Nothing. No people. No dogs roaming. Nothing. It was the middle of the day, and I was in, what I was assuming was, the middle of the town, and there wasn’t a single living soul visible. I was looking right at a post office… Nobody. A church was visible just down the road. Nope. Passing through, I saw houses in various states up upkeep. Not a single person was seen tending either house nor yard. Where the Hell was everybody?

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Cherokee - Road Closed.jpg
    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Cherokee - deserted town 1.jpg
    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Cherokee - deserted town 2.jpg
  11. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    A Hell of a Ride – 17A

    Day 16, 13 September 2017

    Seeing this town like this, dead, in the middle of the day, further strengthened the thoughts I had the day prior about people in the country being forgotten. Sure, the plight of the poor in our cities is an important story, but we are aware of that story. Have any news crews left the comforts of their metro news rooms and gone to see a modern ghost town in a non-election year? Granted, I may be reading this town’s situation completely wrong. They may simply be a sleepy little town, and that’s the way they like it. I do know that people need work to eat, and feed their families though. This town may be small, but where was the traffic, vehicle or foot, that the engine of a town’s commerce would usually generate? Sure, people could be at school, or working on surrounding farms, but I find it hard to imagine that an entire town would sit vacant during the day. It was all a bit unexpected, as well as shocking to me.

    Fast forward to the present day. Months have passed by since I visited this town. I didn’t even know what it was called or where it was located. Reviewing my video footage, I was able to trace the route I took to get there and map track it using online mapping tools. The town is called “Cherokee”, and it’s located on US 400, just West of the Southern Kansas / Missouri border. Looking at the town from a God’s eye view, there still isn’t much to see. There is a “newer” part of the town, which I actually passed through as I got back on the main highway during my journey. That part of the town is essentially and intersection on the Highway, which encompasses a convenience store, a Dollar General store, a bank, and a modern high school, but that is it. According to a Wiki page, Cherokee has a population of 712 people, and judging by the location of a high school there, it must be a hub of the area. To this day, I still don’t know what to make of it exactly. Kansas is the home of the family farm, at least from what I saw. Other states, like Iowa, conducted farming on an industrial scale that was hardly imaginable. Many parts of Kansas that I rode through made me feel as if I was riding through the 1930s. Norman Rockwell could have easily taken his inspiration from modern day Kansas.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Passing Farmhouse.jpg

    Continuing the ride, I relished the sights I was passing by. This place was made for motorcycling. No, it didn’t have the twists and turns a modern sports bike rider would lust after, but there was no denying the connection you immediately felt with the land. You didn’t simply pass through the area. You felt as if you were part of it… At the same time, a large portion of the countryside was becoming a part of me, in the form of large, splattering insects. I was becoming covered in so many bee parts, I was afraid the bees of Kansas would form a posse and put a bounty on my head! Still, despite the damage I was doing to the pollination process, I couldn’t deny the simple beauty of this place. This was Americana at it’s finest.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Passing Motorcyclist.jpg

    I continued my zig-zag across Kansas, eventually halting for fuel just South of a town called Chanute. The truck stop was directly across from a large high school, and little else. I struck up a conversation with a young man in a pickup truck, who confirmed that I was indeed well inside Kansas by now. Up until now, I had just been riding along and looking for route numbers. I had no clue exactly where I was. I relished the feeling of having no responsibility for the moment. I had been perhaps more than 25 years since the last time I hadn’t given any thought to where on the earth I was, plus or minus 10 meters. It was such a small thing, but acknowledging that feeling was like a massive weight had been taken off my shoulders. By now, the mid-day sun, and it’s heat, had caught up with me. I strolled into the store and picked up a couple of cans of Red Bull. The chill of the drink brought my core temp back down to a reasonable level, while the sweetness replenished my depleted stores of energy. After the all to brief respite, I thumbed the starter button again and roared back onto the highway. Next stop – Burlington.

    At one point along the way, while riding at speed on a two lane road, I came over a small rise and was surprised by what was there, waiting in front of me. There waiting for me in the middle of my lane, much like you see buzzards often do, was a Crane or Stork of some sort. Perhaps it was a Heron? The speed limit was 65 MPH on many of those roads, and I’m sure I was doing every bit of that, so I didn’t have time to break out my bird identification book. What I did quickly identify was his ginormous pointed beak which could easily harpoon my chest at 65+ MPH, as he turned to look at me, identified me as a threat, and then took flight. Rather than merely flying to the immediate left or right, and thus not making much of an impression on my memory, this bird decided he could outfly a Ducati Panigale, so he flew along my direction of travel, right down the center of my lane. I assumed, like most birds, he would try to avoid being hit, so I pressed on. I can still see him checking over his shoulder, looking and veering left, looking and veering right, while I moved left and right trying to anticipate which side I would be able to pass him on. He continued on, flying at chest level. At the last moment, when it seemed that picking up a most unusual hitchhiker would be imminent, the bird dipped his substantial wing and swooped off to the right. I could have reached out with my throttle hand and touched him. The absurdity of the moment caused me to laugh out loud in my helmet.

    Before long, I rolled in to Burlington. It had been a short ride, but a long time coming. I was due to meet up with the staff at the local museum, but I still had a little bit of time before I needed to be there. I decided to putter around the town a bit, on the Pani, and get a feel for the place. The first location I was interested in finding was a house I understood to be the family ancestral home. I was always told it was “down by the river” but had little information beyond that. Well, I went down in that direction, but the access wasn’t that straight forward. The houses there had been built back in the 1800s, and truth be told, I wouldn’t know which house would be the right one, even if I was looking at it. I quickly ended that search and moved on. I passed by the small local police department, the well preserved downtown, several churches, and the masonic temple. The town looked amazing! Traffic was slow here too, but at least it existed in this community. I made my way past the town hall, through a residential area, and to the Coffey County Museum. I dismounted Rexy and stood for a moment in the parking lot, relishing my moment of triumph. It had taken every day of my life to get here, but here I was.

    Across the street, on a makeshift track, a youngster zoomed ‘round and around his yard on his mini-motorcycle, no doubt dreaming of bringing fame to his hometown, in his quest to be the next Nicky Hayden.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington Museum - Panigale pic 1.jpg

    I took a moment to assemble my camera equipment in the parking lot, before I entered the museum. I was soaking wet with sweat, with hair disheveled and hidden by a baseball cap. I’m sure I hadn’t shaved in several days. Entering, the air conditioning quickly cooled my wet clothes, chilling me to the bone. To the women standing behind the counter, presumably the ones I had spoken with earlier and shared my story with, I’m sure presented anything but a dashing figure of a Soldier, crossing a continent in and epic quest on his Italian superbike… I introduced myself to them, and in a moment of chivalry, I went to the restroom to at least wash the sweat off my arms and face, to at least present a somewhat respectable figure.

    Erin and Catherine, as I would soon learn their names to be, cracked me up. You could immediately tell there was no BS about them, no putting on airs. Both were younger than me. Being a brunette and a red head, I’ll leave it to the reader’s imagination for who was serious and who was dripping with sarcasm. I liked them immediately. Their personalities quickly came out as the showed me around the museum and told the tale of the town. The did find a bit about my Great Grandfather, but only a very little. It was nice of them to have made the effort for a complete stranger though. They proceeded to take me on a tour of the museum. I think I was the only one in the museum at the time. Clearly, they weren’t expecting a rush of people. I was running the camera, and it was obvious they weren’t thrilled to be in front of it. In a few minutes, the awkwardness went away, and their personalities came out. I wasn’t being taken on a tour by a dried up tour guide. I was being shown around the museum by friends. We joked. They pointed out exhibits they thought were funny for whatever reason. They told me of the impact the nearby nuclear power plant had on the area (it was the primary employer of the area), as well as the story of how a nearby town was flooded and is now at the bottom of a lake, so that the local damn could be built. I pictured the climactic scene from “Oh Brother, Where Art Though” in my head. We all took turns being jokingly sarcastic and condescending. It was all very refreshing and real.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington Museum staff 1.jpg
  12. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    A Hell of a Ride – 17B

    Day 16, 13 September 2017

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington Museum staff 2.jpg

    It soon became closing time at the museum, so we had to wrap up the visit. Before I departed, we went through the now familiar signing ceremony, where the two ladies made their marks. Their work day over, both got in their cars to go home, but not before Catherine had to show off her new “cool” “I like Ike” vanity license plate. Little things make all the difference in small towns.

    I stowed all the camera equipment that I had been using and got the bike and myself ready to move. Unfortunately, I wouldn’t be able to spend the night here. I needed to be in Des Moines, Iowa tomorrow. Like yesterday, I needed to use the rest of today to make up some miles so that I could arrive at my destination tomorrow at a reasonable time. I didn’t want to leave yet, however. The sun was up, and I hadn’t eaten. There was more exploring to do.

    I found a few places to capture some nice photos. I must have made quite the scene, staging a photo shoot, walking around with my spaceman pants on. While in the process of taking a few snaps of the area, a gentleman approached me. It turned out that he was a former mayor of Burlington himself. We talked for a while. I told him about my family connection to the town. I also asked him if there was anywhere good to eat in town, because I would really rather spend my time here than somewhere of no importance to me. He recommended the Mexican restaurant, which was conveniently located right around the corner. Once again, the topic of diversity came up. Breaking again with the stereotype of small towns in middle America lacking diversity, I discovered that there were three traditional sit down style restaurants in the town, and all were owned by ethnic minorities. The restaurant I was going to was owned by a Mexican fella who was now a U.S. citizen, and the chefs were two gentlemen from El Salvador. Another restaurant right next door is Chinese. This information was offered as a matter of fact by the former mayor. I quietly shook my head and smiled. I expected that if any place was going to be an all white town, it would be a place like this. There you go though. Integration is happening, even where you least expect it.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington Founders - Panigale pic 1.jpg

    I said my goodbyes to the mayor and thanked him for the conversation. I hopped back on the bike and backed her into a parking spot on the main street, right in front of the Mexican restaurant. The sun was setting so I got in a few more photos of the area before the light went for the day. While I was doing so, I notice another gentleman making his way toward me, walking down the street. He noticed the Ducati and wanted to ask some questions about it. Rexy was doing her part to help conversations happen! He introduced himself as Luke Allen, and he was opening up a new business on the main street, just a few doors down. I told him a bit about my project and how I was looking at the country from a veteran’s perspective. He told me a bit of his own family’s tradition of military service. He then said something that caught my attention. “Everybody in my family has been in the military except me. I wasn’t able to go. My family was going through some hard times and I had to stay and work on the family business”. Based on his tone of voice, and downcast look, I sensed that he felt some shame when he was saying this. I took the opportunity to explain my purpose further. “There’s nothing to be ashamed about. Life happens. I’m not on a tour of America so I can collect a bunch of pats on the back and make sure everybody thanks me for my service. If anything, I want to thank you for doing what you’re doing, being productive, and making this country worth protecting.”, I said. He kind of brightened up from that and the discussion moved on toward his business, and his own love of motorbikes. It was a great moment and I was really happy he took the opportunity to say hi. He knew I had stopped to eat, so said he wanted to let me go so I could get to it. Before he left, he offered for me to pop in to his store and check it out. He was in the middle of construction, but I was assured I was more than welcome.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington Main Street - Panigale R side.jpg
    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington - Luke mainstreet - Panigale.jpg
  13. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    A Hell of a Ride – 17C

    Day 16, 13 September 2017

    Dinner was simply awesome. Food doesn’t get much better than a hot plate of Carne Asada. Several times, I spoke with the owner there. He was a nice man who had moved into town over 9 years earlier, had bought the restaurant, and staked his place as a member of standing in the town. I liked the place. Though on the night I was there, there were only a few patrons present, it was the kind of place where strangers at separate tables joined in on conversations already in progress with the staff. This was a town that didn’t seem to like strangers. Rather than shunning them, however, people went out of their way to make sure you were no longer a stranger by they time they left your company. I paid up and broke away before I became obligated to buy property in Burlington. Leaving the restaurant, I walked up the street to check out Luke’s place. He was gone. No worries. It was just getting black out now and I needed to move on. Leaving was bittersweet. I had waited my entire life to come visit this place, and I was leaving after only spending about 4 hours there. It is what it is.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington sunset - outskirts.jpg

    I was back on the road – night riding. The sun was well set and the horizon had turned a deep indigo color. I enjoyed 16 miles on the country highway leaving Burlington before I hitched a ride on Interstate 35, making my way Eastward again. The air had cooled dramatically. After having felt the heat offered by Kansas all day, the drop in the temperature was welcome. The freeway was relatively straight, so I tucked down and focused on putting miles behind me. I didn’t fuel up in Burlington, so after 75 miles or so, it was time for a fuel stop. The town was Gardner, and I was dropping into a Phillips truck stop. It was a familiar routine. Pull up to the pump, kickstand down, tankbag off, open the tank, grab the pump handle, fill’er up. As I was doing just that, I noticed something different. Strapped down under the bungies holding my yellow dry bag on was a piece of yellow note paper and a blue sticker I hadn’t seen before. Opening the paper, there was a message written by they guy I had talked to earlier, Luke. He was apologizing for having to leave early and offered his assistance if I ever needed his help, leaving his personal phone number to prove the point. Not only did he offer assistance and leave me with an overall feeling of appreciation for having chosen to undertake this journey, he had left some money behind to help me complete my task. Man… Kansas makes good people. Good luck to you Luke. I hope life treats you well.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - Burlington - Finding Luke note.jpg

    The rest of the trip was just a matter of keeping moving until I was about to fall off. I was getting tire fast. I passed through Kansas City and made my way back into Missouri again, heading in the direction of Des Moines. Kansas City was smaller than I had anticipated, but it had that big city system of dips and twists and overpass turns, just in a compact form. I had originally planned on heading up to Nebraska, I had heard there were endless fields of corn there, but I had to cut a corner, so it wasn’t to be. I had found a Super 8 hotel in a place called Liberty, Missouri, so I pulled in there. Thankfully they had 2 rooms left. I got one and the older couple I held the door open for got the other. The day had been really good to me. The one regret I had wouldn’t come until then next day. I had posted online about the previous day’s exploits, and that I had stayed just outside Kansas City. One of my friends who was an Officer in the Army at Fort Leavenworth was giving me grief that I wasn’t staying with him. I had no idea Fort Leavenworth was anywhere near this area. I could have had free room and board, seen a friendly face or two, and had some good Scotch. Almost perfect. Damn it.

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - MO - Kansas City - overpasses.jpg

    13 Sep 2017 -  KS - MO - Kansas City - Tower.jpg
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  14. Scotty707

    Scotty707 Been here awhile

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    It's the only thing I can say to those who will criticize, but never had the guts to sign the dotted line.

    Keep up the great updates.

    12B/12C - 2002-2010
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  15. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    12B was my first MOS. Oddly enough, they wouldn't let me go active with it. I was herded into another MOS that I'm sure the counselor needed to fill to make his numbers. It all worked out in the end. That first job was pretty cool though.
  16. MadRider777

    MadRider777 Been here awhile

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    Setanta, have you noticed this small censorship in the thread? It's another material for your observations :-)
    Waiting for updates
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  17. fasterlaster

    fasterlaster Been here awhile

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    Really enjoying the trip report. Keep it up and thanks for sharing your adventure with us.
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  18. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

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    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    I didn't see it until you said it. Looks like we lost a page. Must have been tossed out by the admins in their spring cleaning... Ah well, the comment didn't add to the discussion anyway. Just "empty calories". No harm, no foul.
    crashkorolyk and chudzikb like this.
  19. vtcyclist

    vtcyclist Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    ..
    Enjoying your report. As a hayseed from Kansas, son of a career Air Force father, and citizen of Alaska (DLG, JNU) for 10 years, I am finding many connections with your travels. It makes me proud of Kansas to hear what you say of it. Thanks for taking time to write this up.
    Setanta ADV likes this.
  20. Setanta ADV

    Setanta ADV Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    66
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Thank you. Glad you like it. One of my main regrets from this trip was that I didn't have enough time to spend there, getting to know the state and the people better. Gives me ample reason to return though, doesn't it?

    Best ~ Manny