A New Best Chain Lube - CRC No. 03055

Discussion in 'Trials' started by motobene, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    Gosh it's been a few years since Bud Cole of NM turned me only what he said was the best chain lube. CRC No. 03055 food grade chain lube.

    I thought food grade (haha), and filed it away. I was like, "Can you eat it or something?"

    Out of my best previous chain lube, PJ1 Blue, I remembered Bud's recommendation and ordered a can.

    http://www.amazon.com/Grade-Chain-L...=1454355108&sr=1-3-catcorr&keywords=crc+03055

    The lube and even the spray applicator are no laughing matter. I have a new best chain lube (for my requirements and personality) by a clear margin.

    A great chain lube keeps the chain wet looking a very long time, yet it doesn't fling off in spoo onto hub and rim and brake disc. It also does not overspray easily when applied. PJ1 blue was good for staying on once dry, but the heavy percentage of evaporants makes it too thin when applied, causing drips. Some drying time is required. Retention is good, but the lube gets waxy and that is hard to remove later.

    I rode two events Saturday on the Fantic and the chain was as wet looking afterward as when i applied the lube. That surprised me. I saw no dribbles and spoo on other parts. And most importantly - so far anyway - less of a waxy residue.

    Goodbye PJ1 Blue and hello CRC 03055!
    #1
  2. Xanderby

    Xanderby MotoTribologist

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    Perhaps it is, but perhaps its not. It is all subjective and everyone could give you the same testimonial about their lube of choice.

    Personally, I would not prefer a lube that is designed for slow speed oven chains that is described as "very slow evaporation" by the manufacturer and I'll stick to drive chain lubes that dry relatively quickly and are made to withstand weather exposure.
    #2
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  3. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Slow speed chains is what we do. I very much liked it lasted all day! We can sell it off as environment friendly. But, you have to watch out for Bud and his ideas!
    #3
  4. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Long timer

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    Is it sticky, does it attract dirt? It's on minreal oil base no PTFE?
    #4
  5. Xanderby

    Xanderby MotoTribologist

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    Not even trials is that slow, not the kinds of slow that oven chains run at. 6 feet per minute-ish? I don't think so.
    What makes you think it is environmentally friendly? 15% VOC, hydrocarbon propellant and it's still oil based. Food grade does not mean environmentally friendly and it should be the exact opposite of biodegradable if it is formulated correctly. Non toxic in extremely small doses to macro-organisms but highly detrimental to micro-organisms.

    I'm not trying to start an argument and I am genuinely curious, as to why not just use a bike chain lube? To me it seems like trying to fit a square peg into a round hole, but If you are determined to use an alternate product, and you are happy with it, that's great and go for it. I just don't understand the thinking behind it.

    For the price that it costs and weighing the options, I feel a bike chain lube is much more preferable.
    #5
  6. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    Oh great...another oil thread!
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  7. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Long timer

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    It's winter time and to chain oil there is still not the very best found I believe.

    Some chain lubes you can get do lube well but attract dirt, some lube well and doesn't attract dirt but are difficult to apply, some are just crap, (in, my experience so far... )

    In particular this matter I -personal- like to know any improvement, especially because were I live it's raining very often and we have a lot of sand, mud and clay ... and it's no fun to clean chains.
    #7
  8. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    Well I took some of that new chain lube outside and drizzle it on the ground. I waited patiently for hours to see dirt molecules moving toward the wet area but darned if I ever saw any attraction. What did I do wrong?
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  9. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    Maybe they were both guy molecules? Or maybe that doesn't matter in Oklahomo?:-)





































    Hey, it's crappy outside and I'm bored. Please don't hate.
    #9
  10. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    Maybe if I put the lube on a board, and nudge the board toward the evil dirt, some will move toward the lube? Or perhaps that phenomenon is like the following phrase: When you are not looking, this sentence is in Spanish.

    If I just walk away and don't look, maybe when I come back attraction will have worked its magic!

    But more seriously, all this joking has a point. There is much about tribology that seems right on an intuitive level that isn't actually right.

    Avoiding lubing chains because lubrication will "attract" dirt overlooks the accelerated wear of high contact stress and microscopic galling of surfaces. Take a door hinge, for example. If you hear squeaking or groaning you are hearing the accelerated wear from high contact surface stresses. On a microscopic level it's like two surfaces slamming against themselves with surface material getting sloughed off with every crash. Un lubricated chains produce their own wearing agents from materials sloughed off by fretting wear.

    A chain is just a series of hinges under surface contact stress at the hinging interface. And where is the hinging or rotating interface? It is inside the chain.

    The bushings don't rotate in the sprocket teeth grooves. The hinges are on the insides, between pins and bushing insides. dry interfaces in there is where wear takes place fastest. With wear, the chain pitch lengthens relative to sprocket tooth pitch, then the pressure on individual sprocket teeth goes WAY up and sprockets start into accelerated wear. Yes grit does wear them, but pitch change is the real killer of sprocket teeth.

    Dirt may get crushed in sprocket teeth by non-rotating bushings, but it's far better to have more lubricant in the pivoting interfaces than to have too little or none, even with more dirt 'attracted' to the outside.

    Any chain that is squeaking is wearing really fast and converting power to heat through friction. The worst is a chain run in wet, muddy conditions that gets dried out and then run hard squeaky dry.

    When conditions get especially nasty, from wet to dry, I increase frequency of lubrication, rather than reduce it. I'd rather a chain last longer and need some cleaning.

    But heck, to each his own. It's not really that important. Just parts and money :-)
    #10
  11. Brewtus

    Brewtus Buffoonery, Inc.

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    :photog
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  12. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day.

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    Yes, using motorcycle chain lube on motorcycle chains is just out of the realm of possibilities for some. :confused But you think it might just work hey.
    #12
  13. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Motorcycle chain lubes really have not been around long. In fact the gentleman I bought my first trials bike from made and sold the best additive ever. You just mixed it with your favorite motor oil. This article is about a bicyclist that took the same formula one step further. Carl Shipman wrote many books on motorcycling in the seventies.
    http://www.bicyclefixation.com/lubes.htm
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  14. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    I would make a joke about using only motorcycle oil in the crank case, but... :rofl
    ... I never anticipated chain lube turning into another oil thread. :amazon

    Oh and an interesting article on bicycle chain lubes, line.

    Time to move on....
    #14
  15. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Long timer

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    Some are underestimating the challanges as they are NOT riding in the right enviroment, instead riding in warm desert like surroundings which is easy ...

    [​IMG]
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  16. Gordy

    Gordy Team Listo

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    Just put something on it that you might still see evidence of lasting 1/2 a day, keeps everything from squeaking and reduces drag.
    I hate the ones that are waxy. I've found that most m/c chain lubes just make a clumped up dirt/crud mess that is impossible to clean off.
    I've switched to using cheap chain and cable lubes that you can pick up at the auto parts stores. :dunno

    These aren't expensive o-ring chains and seem to last forever. I ride a lot and get over a year on a chain and sprockets go longer than I even know. YRMV
    #16
  17. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    Do understand the challenge of nasty Euromud. I do not live in the desert, but when it rains in the desert it looks like your photo... like the Roswell, NM, event last year.

    Whatever the belief is regarding dirt attraction, it's a person's own bike and own business how they manage it. I live chains for all conditions, like mud.

    That's a really small rear sprocket!
    #17
  18. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    I was stuck on the PJ1 blue for years because I don't want fling-off. But I think that stuff is paraffin with a strong solvent/evaporant. I hated the waxy buildup and scum on the bike.

    So far the CRC stuff is more oily, but oddly doesn't fling off. I haven't tried it on one of my dualsport with higher chain speeds yet, however.
    #18
  19. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    When I had my NX125, I used something that was made by DuPont (it's since been superseded). It required a "dry time" of up to an hour. But, once dry, it didn't attract dirt nor fling off. I thought it worked pretty well. I cleaned the chain once every two months, or so, depending on the weather I'd ridden thru (as a commuter).
    #19
  20. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Long timer

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    That's the original set up with 38 teeth back, I use 12 front, before had 13 front which wasn't bad but for thight sections a little fast. As seen the chain survived very well and isn't clogged much, there was still a lot of wear to the rear sprocket but apparently not to the chain.

    [​IMG]

    Chain alignment was perfect, wheel axle and swing arm axle were parallel too and also the chain tensioner did not got bent through the 120km trials event. The only thing I can remember that we had to ride through a wood part were we hade to ride at the side to a strong gradient hill in rainy weather and I slipped a couple of meters down, got back on the bike and some couple of minutes and around 3 km later found out that I had some brushes with me.
    Fumbled out the brush and branches and forgot it... well should have been more picky ... I think as I saw the outcome.

    The sprocket is now replaced, at least these aluminium sprockets can be custom made for little money.

    That's something I use now too, a dry chain oil with DuPont Teflon or PTFE, works great !
    #20
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