A New Best Chain Lube - CRC No. 03055

Discussion in 'Trials' started by motobene, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    I bought mine at the local 'industrial' hardware store. It was $15 (+ tax). :patch
    #41
  2. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    Cost is low, and availability is high. Cheap for lots of lubings on many bikes.
    #42
  3. LemmeTry

    LemmeTry Over-thinker...

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    Does anyone have comparison comments on the CRC vs BelRay Chain Lubricant?

    How often should I be taking the chain off and cleaning it?
    #43
  4. 1fxstbi

    1fxstbi Been here awhile

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    I use Belray "Super Clean" on my KTM's and it is ok but does have a waxy build up over time. Both bikes (KTM's) have Regina o-ring chains so I never remove them and try to soak them clean. The lube is contained in the o-ring cavity and soaking might wash out the lube. I clean the build up off with a stiff bristle brush and Dawn soap. I've used the Belray on my trials bike chains and get the same build up. Not so with the CRC. Here's a pic of my chain after a two day ride and spraying it with CRC three times and then washing it off with Dawn soap and a brush. I'm sold on the CRC product.
    To answer your other question; I don't remove a chain unless I have a new clip to replace the old one, possible metal fatigue from opening the clip multiple times so I don't remove them unless necessary. But that's just me... image.jpeg
    #44
  5. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    I've never used a good chain lube that doesn't result in some buildup. The best chain lubes have evaporants that help lube spray on, then the evaporants outgas to leave behind stickier and waxier substances that do not so easily sling off. It's a necessary evil of chain lubes. What varies in the formulations are lubricating effectiveness and amount of nastiness left behind.

    I know guys who hate the nasty so much they run their chains dry or near dry. They accept that they will replace chains and sprockets more often. I'd rather do some cleaning.
    #45
  6. heffergm

    heffergm Been here awhile

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    I gave up on chain lubes, at least in trials bikes. I wd40 the sucker after every long ride and when it eventually gets dirty I just point the hose at it and it's clean again.
    #46
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  7. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    I clean my chain after every event. I actually remove it from the bike before I even wash the bike. I haven't considered replacing the master link clip, so Pete brings up a good point. That said, I've never experienced any trouble with a clip having metal fatigue.
    #47
  8. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    I don't have time for every-event maintenance other than fast cleaning and relubing.

    WD-40 is mostly a solvent. There is a little lube in the formulation as well. Good tool to have around and it works on chains, for a little while.

    A pressure washer ready to go out the shop door on all but freezing days. I wash EVERYTHING with pressure washers, yes, even the INSIDES of cars on 100-degree days with wind. Just remove the negative terminal of the battery, wash, then wait for everything to dry out, taking care to not blast sensitive areas like dashboard electronics. Couches, clothes... When I restore antique fans, the first thing is a good blast of degreaser and pressure wash, then time to dry out deep inside after being blown off with air pressure. Oklahoma is great in mid summer for blow dryer air temperature and wind!

    Every half year or year, the waxy stuff will build up on chain and sprockets and nearby areas. I remove the chain and let it soaking in diesel, then it gets a good blast with the pressure washer while laying flat against the concrete. The sprockets get some wire brush action with degreaser and pressure blast. A trick I've learned is degreases on a thin Scotchbrite pad will remove nasty films very well.

    After cleaning I put the chain back on and let it dry out, then re lube.

    I've even done the above with o-ring chains, taking care to keep nozzle orifice back just enough to not overpower o-ring sealing.

    Aggressiveness in cleaning comes from having to take care of so many old machines. I'm NOT that guy who rolls the Harley out and gently rubadubdub caresses the bike with some garden hose dribble!
    #48
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  9. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    Tried some of the older Belray Chain Lube, can not get it any more. The rear wheel spun much more and easier, than it did when using wd40. There was some gummy build up after a few days since using the belray, so I sprayed the wd40 on it, and the remaining belray came back to life again. The wheel spun better than using strait belray. So concluding that maybe its best to mix it up a little, depending on what the chain looks like. The wd40 cleaned the existing belray some.
    Got some Belray Clean chain lube coming. The other Belray choice was Blu tac, and that just sounds too sticky. Also the old belray was very easy to apply with its spray nozzle tube, just the right amount with ease, right on the side plates.
    #49
  10. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    WD-40 is mostly solvent, so it will go into solution with residual paraffin waxes and re lube a chain. WD-40 is poor by itself is relatively poor as a lubricant.
    #50
  11. Xanderby

    Xanderby MotoTribologist

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    With the new stuff you have coming, a little bit goes a long way. I'd suggest trying to just spritz the chain rather than spray it full blast. Otherwise too much goes on and it ends up flinging. Just a little bit of it does everything you need, you end up getting a lot more applications out of each can, and it keeps everything nice and clean that way.
    #51
  12. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    Used to doing that , just enough , in between the side plates. too much just makes a mess. Sounds like you approve of this new stuff, belray cleanlube.
    #52
  13. LemmeTry

    LemmeTry Over-thinker...

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    I've been using that bel-ray stuff for the past year, but hate the waxy build-up. So I'm trying 'Bene's food grade stuff now. I haven't used it enough to know whether I like it or not.
    #53
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  14. Champe

    Champe Been here awhile

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    Food grade chain oil is funny.

    For many years I was in charge of a municipal water system. We could only use food grade oil on the pump seals and bearings. We got it at the supermarket - vegetable oil for cooking. I bet it would work ok on a chain too. With no thickeners to reduce sling-off it might not be good for high speed, but for trials it might be ok. Cleanup would be easy.
    #54
  15. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    If it's just oil it will fling off even at trials speeds, speckling the brake disc with oil.
    #55
  16. Champe

    Champe Been here awhile

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    Right. I would not recommend vegetable oil for chains except if there is nothing else available.

    Chain saw bar oil has thickeners to prevent fling off. But regular motor oil is commonly used when the specialty oil is not on hand. Works fine, and fling-off is not really noticeable.

    20 years ago wax lubricants were the rage for mountain bike chains. The chain would stay dry - eliminating the mess that oil makes. This was an important factor for those who transported their bikes inside a car. Never saw these wax lubricants for motorcycles - maybe not so good for larger chains at higher speeds. Also, you needed to use either wax or oil on bicycle chains - no alternating or mixing.
    #56
  17. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    Had tried the wax motorcycle chain lube last year, thinking it would stay cleaner and not collect dirt, Wrong, once it dried and was ridden for a few hours, it got very dirty, and was more difficult to clean than oil based chain lubes, That is why I switched to WD40 use, easy apply, easy to clean chain after, leaves no residue build up.
    #57
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  18. heffergm

    heffergm Been here awhile

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    There are a ton of wax based motorcycle chain lubes available... I still think they suck too (although the smell of Maxima chain wax reminds me of my KX80 from the late 80's, so that's nice). I use WD40, so does Stu. You just hit it frequently, and you don't end up with the giant mess you get with anything else I've ever tried over the past 30 years.
    #58
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  19. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    In this new plan to be tried, hit it once in a while with the belray, and continue the use of wd40, will see what happens. Reason for this, was that after using the belray, I had noticed that the wheel spun So much easier, as compared to wd40 use.
    #59
  20. Xanderby

    Xanderby MotoTribologist

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    Just FYI, if you have a film of WD40 on there, other chain lubes might not adhere very well. They are meant to stick to metal surfaces, but the oil film can disrupt that film. If you clean it before applying though, it's no worry.
    #60
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