A Parks and Forests ride of Australia's South East

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by bull600, May 3, 2016.

  1. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    A Parks and Forests ride of Australia’s South East


    With only a week available this year for our annual trip away on the bikes we decided to try and venture to some previously uncharted territory. The Otway Ranges in South Western Victoria and some of the parks and state forests through the goldfields area looked promising, so a route was devised that ended up looking like this:


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    Day 1


    On a Friday night we decided to hit the road straight after work and get a few kms under the belt before dark.

    Ready to roll

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    First it was past Paracombe and down to Gorge Rd

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    Before we followed the Torrens River through Cuddle Creek and then branched off to Lenswood. We then passed through the German settlement of Hanhdorf

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    From there it was a pretty good run through to Langhorne Creek where we set up camp, not far past the pub at the Frank Potts Reserve (free camping - complete with toilet).

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    It was pretty busy but most people were in vans and stayed pretty quiet. The only issue was the proximity to the main road that made for a noisy night with traffic (got to love earplugs :D). Once camp was set up it was then just a short stroll down to the local pub.

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    Which, despite being a busy little place on a Friday night, put on an excellent (and cheap) meal :clap:clap

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    Link to Map of Day 1

    Day 2

    We awoke to a misty morning in the heart of wine country

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    But it wasn’t long before we made it the 33kms down the Langhorne Creek Rd to the River Murray and the ferry at Wellington

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    Once on the other side of the river we headed south on the Princes Hwy to the start of the dirt at Nine Mile Rd where we turned off and headed past Malinog (blink and you’ll miss it :D)

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    As we headed south the fog slowly rolled in and made for difficult going. Low visibility, misty visors and early morning roos made for an interesting combination :eekers

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    Finally the fog cleared and we stopped for a break at a campsite we had pegged for our return leg amongst some granite boulders.

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    The weather had cheered up but the road name gave us a hint of what it can be like in winter :evil

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    One of the goals of this trip was to check out as many National/State/Conservation Parks as we could squeeze in on our route. The first of these was Mt Boothby Conservation Park

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    I had been here before on a previous trip to the South East (Ride Report here) and although there was a little sand and some rocks the track is pretty good and follows the perimeter of the park where there’s always plenty of emus and roos to be seen

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    Once out of the park we headed south until we picked up Deepwater Rd (despite the No Through Road sign). This road follows the southern boundary of Messent Conservation Park which had recently been damaged by fire (December 2015)

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    Sure enough the road soon came to an end as it entered Currawong Station

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    However, just before the grid a sandy track heads off to the right and enters the conservation park.

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    The track starts off being quite firm

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    But then the sand increases, although some of the deeper sections can be avoided

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    There is one little steep section not far from the end of the track that could be a bit of a struggle with bigger loaded bikes but it’s worth the trip through.

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    Once over this crest the track hardens up and soon leads into Salt Creek, a tiny settlement on the Princes Hwy that was recently made famous after two female backpackers were kidnapped and raped at a nearby beach. It even made headlines overseas :eek7

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    Needless to say the roadhouse has been in the spotlight of late

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    So we decided to give them some business filled up with fuel and ordered some burgers from the “Killa from the Grilla” menu :rofl

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    Which were pretty damn good actually :clap:clap

    After our lunch we entered the Coorong National Park. This area is a long, narrow ribbon of saline wetlands that spread all the way from the mouth of the Murray River. They are protected from the Southern Ocean by high coastal dunes which can be crossed at several spots along the coast enabling access to the beach.

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    We followed the dirt Loop Rd to one of these, Tea Tree Crossing. (It was near here that the recent attack took place). At this spot, during certain times of the year, the water recedes enough to enable vehicles to cross over the wetlands

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    The favored route is indicated by a series of poles that lead to the dunes on the other side

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    Having encountered the deep soft sand on previous 4x4 trips we just had a quick spin across and then returned without going over to the beach. Once past the Loop Rd we then took the Old Coorong Rd (dirt) which winds its way between the beach and the main highway

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    Passing by what are mainly dry saltpans this far east of the river mouth

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    The Old Coorong Rd ends near a spot called ‘The Granites’ where access can easily be made down onto the beach

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    From there it’s a 15km run along the hard packed sand to Kingston

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    The town of Kingston is located on Lacepede Bay and has ‘Larry’ the Big Lobster as its main attraction. The 17mt high structure has been an icon of the area since 1979 but was running into disrepair until the radio duo of ‘Hamish and Andy’ launched a charity campaign early in 2016 to save it :-)

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    Once past Kingston we tracked along the bitumen for a while before turning off into the pine forest area at Wangolina. After weaving around the dirt roads south we turned off Kangaroo Hill Rd and picked up a track that headed through some young pines

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    and then followed one of the many irrigation drains in the area

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    This area is part of the Woakwine Conservation Reserve

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    Once out of the reserve we crossed over the drain on a bridge that had seen better days

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    before continuing to weave our way south through some nice tracks

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    until we arrived at Millicent

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    With an important AFL match to watch live on TV that night, we had prearranged a little cabin in the caravan park, that turned out to be a treat :clap (Go Crows)

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    Link to Map of Day 2

    Day 3

    Next morning saw another glorious day. My intended route took us down a little used track that ended in a gate.

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    The next road was visible in the distance but after running across the paddock I soon returned with the news that there was a drain on the other side that blocked our progress. So, we backtracked and were soon on our way along the Woakwine Range that now contains a massive wind farm development that is the largest in the Southern Hemisphere (129 turbines when completed).

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    I guess the jury is still out on their aesthetic appeal..

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    As we headed further south we passed through various pine forest roads and tracks taking us through the Kongorong Forest Reserve

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    and even came across a ‘Deliverance’ style farm complete with wrecked cars.

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    Not far past the farm we popped out onto the bitumen of Mt Salt Rd that took us past Little Blue Lake

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    Not to be confused with its big brother ‘The Blue Lake’ in Mt Gambier (which is a crater lake in an extinct volcano), Little Blue is a sinkhole formed by the dissolving of limestone by groundwater. It is a popular swimming hole in the summer and is accessed by certified Cave Divers who have discovered many an interesting thing at the top of the 36mt deep rubble pile

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    Not far from Little Blue we passed by the other distinct volcano in the area - Mt Shank

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    If passing and you have the time it’s well worth the hike up to the top where a great view of the surrounding area can be had (photo from a previous trip)

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    The other karst feature that is worth a look in the region is Hell’s Hole. It’s a spectacular sinkhole found in the Caroline Forest Reserve. Not far off the Sea Coast Hill Rd the site has some conflicting access information but can easily be reached on a bike

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    The difference between this site and Little Blue is that the water level is 30mts below the edge :eek7 A gantry and platform have been erected to allow easier cave diver access

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    Back in the 1980’s when I first dived there the lake was covered in duckweed and we abseiled in and prusiked up a single rope to get out again :nod

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    Once past Hells Hole it was on through our next park, this time Penambol

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    where some nice forest was traversed


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    It was then a quick run to Donavans, a small settlement on the edge of the Glenelg River, before we crossed the border into Victoria

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    We passed through Nelson, where the Glenelg River meets the sea

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    and then turned onto North Nelson Track that runs up through the Lower Glenelg National Park. It was in good condition but the large number of wallabies about meant the speeds were kept down

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    This road then met the River Rd and we continued to the east following the river on our left

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    This was a great run through the forest that passed several maintained campsites on the river’s edge (Forest Camp & Battersby’s)

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    After leaving the park our next run was through Cobboboonee Forest Park

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    via Boiler Swamp Rd. This was a fantastic run along a straight section of very smooth track. Our speed was only limited by the risk of the ever present wallabies

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    At the end of the road we picked up part of the SWAT track that took us through some interesting countryside

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    The occasional hazard kept us on our toes, including a wire of sorts strung across the track

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    (Luckily the logs over the track were small enough to move :nod)

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    In was then time to stop off for some lunch in Portland

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    Where we found a bakery that suited our needs (as do most bakeries :evil)

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    After lunch we followed the coast road around the bay before joining the Princes Hwy at Allestree. With strong head and cross winds as well as trucks blowing us around, it was easy to why we preferred to travel on the dirt :ricky. Port Fairy was a welcome break. A pretty spot nestled along the edge of the Moyne River, albeit rather touristy.

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    Soon we had to decide on what we were going to do about a campsite for the night. This whole area was pretty intensive farmland with no state parks nearby. The Wikicamps App I had showed a possibility of a camp at Panmure, which wasn’t too far off our intended route, so we headed up there to check it out. Unfortunately, although the spot was empty and had some grass it was very exposed and right next to the highway. So, we wandered around the nearby area until I spotted this from one of the back roads

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    It didn’t look like much but was clearly an easement between two paddocks, so we pushed on into to see where it led

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    After a while the grass got higher and it closed in but we found enough space to be able to turn around and set up a nice stealth campsite

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    The plan was to head into the pub for tea but when we got there it was closed (not sure what the ‘Open 7 Days' sign means!)

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    As it still wasn’t dark we decided to head up the road 20km to Terang, having first rung the pub to check it was open! With our LED spotlights working a treat on the way back we avoided any wildlife and ended up setting up a small fire under a huge pine right next to our tents, where we downed our take way six pack :wings

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    Link to Map of Day 3

    To be continued...
    #1
  2. Goosefeather

    Goosefeather Captain Slow

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    996
    Location:
    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    looks like a great ride - nice photos.

    How do the vertically mounted light bars perform?
    #2
  3. Valleyam

    Valleyam South Australian Tiger resistance group

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    494
    Location:
    Angaston, Barossa Valley, South Australia.
    Excellent report, looking forward to the next installment. thanks for sharing.
    #3
  4. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Yeah they're not bad - especially considering they are just ebay cheapies (~ $30 a pair!). It was the first time Russ had used them and they were fine.

    Here's a vid that alerted us to them



    I use the ADVMonster LED's which are brighter but then again they are 6x the price!!

    Cheers :thumb
    #4
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  5. Baz131

    Baz131 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    147
    Location:
    Bunbury Western Australia
    Great RR and nice pics. Keep it coming.
    #5
  6. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 4

    After a quiet night in our little hideaway camp we awoke to another foggy morning. After checking the map I found that Rollos Rd that started just behind the pub, was a straight run back to our initial route. It turned out to be a nice secondary tar road that was a great way to start the day.

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    We soon hooked back onto the Great Ocean Rd (B100) for a short stint before branching off east past the Curdies River when the GOR tracked south.

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    Although a very scenic piece of highway (that I have driven before) we had always planned to stay north of it and track through roads and tracks less travelled, much of which wound through the forests.

    As we headed towards Cowley’s Creek we rode up the hill along Wild Dog Rd where the fog still hung above the countryside

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    It was a good spot for a break before heading into the Otway Ranges

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    One section of the intended route that had a bit of a question mark, was along Boulevarde Rd, near the Kennedys Creek State Forest. We wanted to head down Gellibrand River Rd but it was unclear if it was possible to get through (both from a landowner point of view and with the river crossing).

    We found the turn off Boulevarde Rd where we needed to go (Deans Rd on the Gps) but there was no sign, just a gate.

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    With stock on the other side but no lock we decided to poke down and see where it headed. I made sure to take it nice and slowly as I passed the cattle, the last thing I wanted was an irate farmer around the bend :nah

    After a short stint I noticed that Russ wasn’t following… mmmm maybe the farmer had caught up with him after all? So I did a U turn and headed back, only to find that he hadn’t made much progress past the gate :eek7

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    Oops.. It seems that as he got on his bike his right foot slowly slid down the edge of the embankment and over he went, with a nice slow speed smack on the head for good measure :(

    After getting the bike back on two wheels we finally made our way through and found the river just past a small pumping station.

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    After a quick look around we crossed the river over a small bridge then popped out onto Gellibrand River Rd through another unlocked gate

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    This road proved to be a great little run as it followed the river south towards the highway

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    Our next little test came after cutting off B100 again and taking Hiders Rd towards the coast. The sign at the turn off said there was no access through to the beach but we thought we would check it out. After a while we turned off onto Old Coach Rd past a “No Through Road” sign and as we continued we came up behind a small walking tour bus. Finally the track ended in a gate with some walkers coming down on the other side.

    This sort of situation can sometimes be a little ‘confrontational’ as often walkers (horse riders, mountain bikers etc) can get their noses out of joint when confronted by those of us on motorbikes. Luckily, being a couple of older farts, we soon struck up a conversation with the walking guide who was a nice bloke. We enquired about the status of the track past the gate that continued to the coast and after a while he agreed that he thought it was a gazetted road and if careful we should be ok to continue. As we were chatting the first of his walkers arrived at the bus (he was their pick up) and despite a few glares they too softened up when they realized we were having a friendly chat with their guide.

    In the end they even opened the gate for us and we headed up to a fantastic view of the surrounding coastline

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    The track winds its way along the ridge line and forms part of the 104km Great Ocean Walk

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    As we moved closer to the coast, Johanna Beach stretched off to the South East

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    From there it was a short bumpy ride down the last part of the track to Red Johanna Rd and then on to Old Ocean Rd that ends just outside Glenaire

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    Despite the name ‘Sand Rd’ proved to be a nice easy run through to the crossing of the Aire River

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    Here a well maintained bridge crosses the river and there are a couple of large Vic Park campsites (Aire River West & East)

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    They were nice and quiet but bookings have to book online and they’re not cheap ($25+ per tent site)

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    Our next stop was Apollo Bay, one of the busy coastal towns along the Great Ocean Rd. I was surprised at the huge numbers of tourists that were there, especially considering the Victorian school holidays were over. Large tour coaches clogged the main street but we managed to fluke a park right out the front of the bakery (although we gave the scallop pies a miss)

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    Keen to get away from the crowds we turned off the GOR again and headed north up Wild Dog Creek Rd. This was another great minor road that weaved its way through the forest scenery

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    We continued north and headed up past Mt Sabine through the heart of the Otway Forest

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    Winding our way along

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    Until we came to Erskine Falls Rd. Here we turned off and headed towards Lorne, after first going down to check out the falls (which were hardly a trickle)

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    During Christmas 2015 a wild fire spread through the area near Lorne and a total of 116 homes were lost in nearby Separation Creek and Wye River. Not for the first time Lorne was lucky to escape the carnage

    The scene on the Great Ocean Road on Christmas Day (news photo)

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    The town itself was quite a little less hectic than Apollo Bay

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    With a nice sandy beach at the foreshore

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    From Lorne we decided to take the Great Ocean Rd over to Anglesea. The scenery was nice but we needed to be on our toes as we followed a load of tourists in a 4x4 who continually braked sharply on every corner :baldy. In the end we stopped at ‘Devil’s Elbow’ to let them get away from us

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    It seems money is not an issue if you want a house with a view along this stretch of road

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    Once at Anglesea we decided to grab a tent site at the Caravan Park for the night but not before first stocking up on a few items

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    Ready to head off to camp :rofl:rofl

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    The park was not far and provided ‘bush campsites’ at $36 a night. Pretty steep but nothing like the $80 they charge during peak season :eekers:eekers

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    The park is right on the mouth of the Anglesea River

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    And the trees indicate there is no shortage of wind around

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    The birdlife was quite prolific

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    Including a number of Sulphur Crested Cockatoos who seemed quite interested in Russ’s clothes bag (they hadn't worked out yet that his dirty jocks were in there :D)

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    The one good thing about the park was the large camp kitchen, where we cooked up a storm

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    And then finished our Coronas as the sun went down

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    Link to Map of Day 4

    to be continued...
    #6
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  7. ninja97

    ninja97 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    247
    Location:
    melbourne,australia
    Another great ride report Bull, I get itchy feet every time I read one.

    Looks like the mighty DR is still going strong, yellow ones are the fastest .
    #7
    bull600 likes this.
  8. masterbrewer

    masterbrewer TDMster

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,141
    Location:
    Adelaide, South Australia
    As usual :clap:clap:clap
    #8
  9. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,595
    Location:
    Da UP, eh! (Marquette, MI)
    Fantastic!

    :thumb
    #9
  10. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Cheers Ninja! The old girl is still going strong, just clocked over 60,000km while we were away. Only three hundred thousand kms more and I'll be in your rarified company :rofl:rofl

    Cheers :thumb
    #10
    JagLite likes this.
  11. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 5

    Today we left the coast and began heading north. After passing through the last of the Otway National Park we skirted along the Inverleigh Forest Reserve

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    And then dropped steeply down to through the Moorabool River valley

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    The first of the parks on our list today was Steiglitz Historic Park, where we descended down Hut Rd off C142

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    It was then on to the adjoining Brisbane Ranges National Park

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    Where we really found only the main tracks were open, the rest closed for walkers or ‘Management Vehicles’

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    This changed our plans slightly as I had routed to travel along a few of these smaller tracks. As I got off my bike to check the map it decided to take a nap up against Russell :doh

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    In the end we settled on Aeroplane Rd which led us out through the north east corner of the park

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    From there it was a short hop to Bacchus Marsh, were we decided to grab some lunch. The temperature was on the rise and after wandering around in our bike gear grabbing some rolls we were starting to boil. Luckily we found a little park to stop and have our food and despite some nearby foot traffic we discreetly dropped our dacks to cool off (a photo of that would’ve been a bit too suss :uhoh:uhoh)

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    Once past Bacchus Marsh we headed north once more, this time into Lerderderg State Park

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    We followed Bluegums Track

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    Before turning off on to O’Briens Rd that took us past the campsite of the same name

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    Not far past the campground we hooked off right onto Amblers Lane. This led steeply down (that would be a problem if wet) to a dry crossing of the Lerderderg River

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    There were some quite nice campsites down there and it would be a good spot to stay if there was water in the river, however, this track is subject to seasonal closure.

    We then took Allens Ck Rd through some more magnificent forest

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    This led us through to Countess Rd that popped out on the main road (C318)

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    Just down the road from Trentham

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    This quaint little town has a thing for wombats

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    But I just enjoyed sitting back and watching the locals having a chat in the main street as they go about their chores for the day

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    With a bit more time the pub looks like it is well worth a visit

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    From Trentham we headed via some back roads up through the small towns of Drummond and Taradale with a few short stops to check out interesting bits along the way. This included an interesting ‘chopper’

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    Our aim was to head to campsite I had been to before up near Mt Alexander and as we headed north we managed to find some more nice tracks

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    Mt Alexander Regional Park was our next destination with a nice twisty tar road leading up to the summit

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    There is a large transmission tower near the lookout

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    That has some unusual dangers during winter

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    The lookout area gives a nice vista of the surrounding area

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    The camping spot at Leanganook (just south of the summit) was a cracker and it wasn’t long before the tents were up

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    After the mandatory 12v inflation of the Exped mattresses

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    We organized our ‘kitchen’ area around the fire spot

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    And then did a few chores, including the swap out of Russ’s LED headlight globe replacement (mine had failed on our last Tassie trip :baldy:baldy)

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    Soon it was time to get the fire going

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    And knock out some dinner before settling in for the night


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    Link to Map of Day 5

    to be continued...
    #11
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  12. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    499
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 6

    As we cruised down the windy road from the peak of Mt Alexander we were treated to another beautiful morning.

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    There’s nothing better than the first hour or two on the bike in the morning, except for the constant watching out for kangaroos :nod

    After passing through the small town of Harcourt we were soon in Castlemaine. Our original plan had been to visit some of the State Parks south of there but with a deadline for return home on Friday we decided to hit the bitumen for a while to make up some miles. This took us through Newstead

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    and then on past Maryborough before we turned off onto a track at the back of the Capilano Honey factory

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    This led us to Paddy Ranges State Park where had a great run through a maze of tracks that luckily, were generally well signposted

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    Eventually we popped out from Golden Track and it was then just a short run into Avoca. We had wanted to visit the Pyrenees State Forest but time was against us so we decided on plan B, which took us through the Mt Cole State Forest

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    After taking the main road in we then turned off onto some steeper tracks

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    That had us confused for a while until we stopped and sorted out where we were on the gps.

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    It turns out we had taken a side track of Glut Rd by mistake but luckily we were able to get back onto our route after wandering around for a while

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    This whole area is a great place to visit, with lots of tracks to explore and camping opportunities available. It also incorporates the old growth forest of Victoria Mill Scenic Reserve

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    By now food was high on the priority list so once out of the forest we hightailed it to Ararat where we fueled up and looked for a feed. After picking up a new globe for Russ’s headlight we were given the word that the Blue Duck Hotel was the place to eat so we set off to find it.

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    We weren’t disappointed with an excellent (and cheap again!) lunch

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    The last significant park we had planned to visit was the Grampians National Park. This is a substantial park (over 165,000 ha) that has as its core a series of towering sandstone mountain ranges.

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    There are a number of ways to enter the park but we ended up coming in on the main road through Halls Gap. The park is very popular and we followed a slow line of cars up along the main Mt Victory Rd. Eventually we got up high enough to stop for a glimpse of the far reaches of the park in the distance

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    After stripping off some of our jacket/pants liners due to the heat we soon left the main stream tourist route and branched off to a 4x4 route known as Wallabies Rocks Track.

    It was in pretty good condition

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    with only a few rough sections and one long descent that gave our brakes a little test. Eventually we made our way to Red Rock Rd which runs along the western side of the park and started scouting for a campsite. As we passed Red Rock Creek we noticed some nice looking areas off to our east so we headed bush and found an excellent spot to camp.

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    By this stage we were boiling so it was off with the riding gear and out with a few cold beers!!

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    Finally, we got around to setting up camp in the shadow of the nearby escarpment

    [​IMG]

    Link to Map of Day 6

    Day 7

    For the first time on the trip we awoke to the sound of rain on the tents :cry. It was disappointing because we had wanted to take one of the more iconic runs in the park up along the Victoria Ridge Track in the morning before we made serious inroads into heading for home.

    With the track bound to be slippery and the whole top of the range covered in cloud

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    We decided that it would be best left for another day. With quite a few kms to travel we took off on the back roads route I had put together. It was mainly secondary tar roads that covered a wide variety of terrain and landscape.

    [​IMG]

    Traffic was sparse and the wildlife generally kept off the road which made it an enjoyable run through to Naracoorte, where we spied our lunch stop of choice

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    As we sat eating our chunky steak pies we noticed a classic BSA sitting right across the road

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    I had travelled the route from Naracoorte before but as is always the way things change over time and a locked gate appeared where there previously had been a through track

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    It didn’t take long to find a way around and we were soon back to some nice out of the way tracks

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    Some were a little sandier than I remembered

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    While others ran through some nice woodlands between farms

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    The main concern was the high bug population that meant stopping for a ‘spray and wipe’ at intervals along the way

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    By mid afternoon we had made good time and reached our ‘Granites’ campsite not far out of Coonalpyn, we had even left some wood from a previous stay there

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    It was then a quick run into the pub for a meal before returning to camp for our last night - under an almost full moon :clap

    [​IMG]
    Link to Map of Day 7

    Day 8

    One of the reasons we had chosen the ‘Granites’ campsite was that it was only a few hours from there back home, which made it an easy morning run. With no fog this time around we were soon in Tailem Bend

    [​IMG]

    Overlooking the Murray River we had crossed just a week before

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    From there it was a fast run for 100km back down the freeway and home.

    Once again we’d had a great trip and the DR’s just keep keeping along..

    In all we covered over 2500kms and visited a total of 25 different Parks and Reserves throughout the journey. For anyone looking to travel through these areas I’ve uploaded all of the gps logs to the fantastic ‘Trans Australia Trails’ website, including various waypoints of interest.

    And don’t forget – “You don’t stop riding when you get old, you get old when you stop riding!”

    Until next time :wave

    Cheers :thumb

    Link to Map of Day 8
    #12
    felixblack1, JagLite, Kiwi Mo and 2 others like this.
  13. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,402
    Location:
    Kingsmill Corner Ont.
    Very nice report. Thanks for posting...Dave
    #13
  14. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,207
    Location:
    Wellington,New Zealand
    was rcently in Melbourne for a week.As a lot of visitors do we hired a car and took off for a few days to the GOR.A highlight of the trip was the Cape Otway Lighthouse and The Otway Forest(Otway Fly a treetop walk).I was amazed how similar the Old beech forest resembled a NZ beech forest,complete with very familiar looking ferns!
    I was keen to take some backroads but a Toyota Camry isnt the best tool for your tracks!
    #14
  15. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,375
    Location:
    Dixie
    Fantastic report! Loved all the great scenery and commentary. Thanks for taking us along to places I'll never be able to go.
    #15
  16. Ramdog

    Ramdog just having a look

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    58
    Location:
    Far North Coast NSW
    Thanks Bull, always a pleasure to read your ride reports, & the older photo's made it even more fascinating. Cheers for sharing your tracks on TAUT, great to be able to use bits an pieces when riding those area's. :clap
    #16
  17. MacMan

    MacMan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2007
    Oddometer:
    882
    Location:
    Outer NW Melbourne
    Tops!
    #17
  18. Valleyam

    Valleyam South Australian Tiger resistance group

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    494
    Location:
    Angaston, Barossa Valley, South Australia.
    Great Report. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Looks like you had a great time. Shame some of the tracks were locked that you planned to use.
    #18
  19. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,341
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    Magnificent! :clap
    Thanks for bring us along for the ride :thumb :ricky
    #19
  20. JimRidesThis

    JimRidesThis Local celebrity

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2012
    Oddometer:
    678
    Location:
    Cumbria, UK
    Fantastic report and pictures, and thanks for the Trans Australia Trails link. My brother lives in Adelaide (Coromandel Valley?) and I have a friend just south of Brisbane (Redland Bay). I must get out there to see them both and fit in a big bike trip in between!
    #20
    bull600 likes this.