About Schmidt

Discussion in 'New Zealand' started by Padmei, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. Steve in NZ

    Steve in NZ scared/cheap

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    stll awaiting the bit where u stop and rebuild the bike
  2. NordieBoy

    NordieBoy Armature speller

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    He doesn't need to stop now...
  3. Dino3310

    Dino3310 Been here awhile

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    Paders that was awesome mate, most excellent video
  4. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    I don't know, it's a sculpture that happens to move under its own steam(punk). But it's a bit too "out there" for me. But hey, I can relate to it running on one cylinder, having bits fall off and especially, having fuel pissing out of the float bowl.

    What amazed me, was that he seemed genuinely surprised that his tank leaked :rofl.

    Anyway, good on him for doing stuff like this, we need more people like him. Hopefully, he will use a japanese bike next time.:evil
  5. Micawberism

    Micawberism Been here awhile

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    What an awesome vid mate :clap
    No doubt some people wont get it :huh i believe the guy on the 1200 at the end did :D
    Two words I took from the video, Attitude and Dreams :clap





    Who cares if the tank leaked :D
  6. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    I am sure you got it.
  7. Micawberism

    Micawberism Been here awhile

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    And I am sure your right about that :D
  8. ontic

    ontic

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    I really enjoyed the video. I love some quality shed time like that. And what a nice shed! It also made me feel sad for my broken tig welder and useless bottle of argon just sitting there staring at me (staring at me with its outrageous rental fees in its eys!).
    As an craft/art-work, it is kindof a cool creation, but.... if it don't ride well I don't appreciate it much. I'm not big on purely aesthetic mods especially when the function suffers. But in the end it is not even that. Did he touch the engine? Aside from clip ons and all sorts of dodgy hand control tweaks, has he changed anything to do with geometry or suspension? Aside from a slippery saddle, why does it ride liks such shit? Even if the end result was still a bike that handled horribly and was dangerous and unreliable, I'd still appreciate it more if he actually tried something below the superficial surface- albeit a very creative and impressive superficial skin. Extend the rear, shorten the rear, tweak the engine, do something crazy on the front end, at least touch the engine...
    Wobbly front end, fuel pissing out of a carb- this is basic stuff on the stock underlying bike that should have been addressed. I'm sure at some point it was addressed and I wish the film followed on past that point until it actually became ridable.

    Cool guy, great shed, nice film, I love his style and I'd love to kill some time there sipping beer and braking stuff with him, but I hope things turned out better for that R75.
    Thanks for the watch.
  9. Padmei

    Padmei enamoured

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  10. Box'a'bits

    Box'a'bits In need of repair

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    If you could swap Schmidtty for Gonzo, would you? In hindsight would you still do what you have done?
  11. Padmei

    Padmei enamoured

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    :lol3 No I don't think so. Gonzo was a great bike but was too top heavy for me to pick up or hold up in those tricky situations. It was doing my back in big time. That's why I got the drz for trails & Schmidt for working on & gravel bashing. In hindsight after the little amount of adv riding I've done on snotso the drz i should have really got the litest trail bike I could find as snotso still tweaks my back when picking him up - I find it pretty fricking grunty tho:D

    I also wanted a project & the airheads appealed for that reason. I certainly wouldn't take Schmidt for an extended ride. I love workng on it but have to admit I get a bit sick of hearing new noises from different departments - ie the bloody gearbox whine. I was naively hoping that after repairing or replacing parts they would remain good for at least a few years.

    I was talking to Jatz the other nite as he rocked up on his new BMW F800GS & he commented how after having the Big & the Ten & other older bikes that needed attention how nice it was to walk out to the shed push the starter button & ride. I started thinking about whether i'd get to that stage with Schmidt. I realised tho that working on them is a major source of enjoyment for now & I'd get pretty sick of just riding every weekend. That may very well change but for now it is ok.
  12. Voltaire

    Voltaire Titanium and Ceramic Hipster

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    I too like the spannering as part of the bike experience....preferably before trips and not during.......
    I found the last two moderns about as interesting as kitchen appliances in that respect....and the depreciation and service costs don't really do it me either.....
    On a side note , bought an engine less VW beetle just for the IRS rear end and my mate and my Son picked it up at 8:00 on Sat....pulled it to bits gassed the rear out and had the body at scrap dealer at 11:30.....my Son said it was a fun morning....even got $60 for the shell!!!!:rofl
  13. ztaj

    ztaj jatz

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    Don't get me wrong Padders..... I enjoyed the fixing/shed time, it's just that the Big went from one issue to the next,although I knew that bike inside out, and the Ten... the less said the better. I could fix a carb needle on the 350's in about 20 mins on the side of the road :deal
    I can only afford 1 bike and it's my main form of transport so it's gotta be good :evil
  14. Mark_S

    Mark_S Fair Weather Faggot

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    did you really say that?

    I thought riding every possible weekend was the whole point of just about everything....

    shed time - while not unpleasant - is just a consequence of the fun stuff
  15. msmckeon

    msmckeon Just ahead of the sweeps

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    Exactly why I moved from an R80G/S in 2001 to a 2001 F650 Dakar. About my 21st or so motorcycle and first new one, Great decision, that bike took me and my partner all over the South Island High Country and back country for 6 1/2 years, 36,000 km of hard duty (hours of clutch slipping) without missing a beat while keeping the G/S humming required nightly attention, time that could have been used for "après ride" activity (route sheet assembly for a start).

    However, changed it for a new 2007 Dakar. What a disaster, ride after ride completely ruined for 3 years, until it was swapped for another new EFI BMW, which I promptly sold and returned to an airhead.

    I guess that most of the time, for most people, a new bike ensures dependability and low unplanned maintennace, but I personally don't believe any more!

    I didn't want to revert to an "adventure" airhead - that 2001 Dakar was the best bike I ever owned, for exactly the reaons you advance - but at least anthing that goes wrong can be 1) diagnosed and 2) fixed. Look on the bright side of your woes. Air, spark and fuel (or mechanical bits), find what is missing and fix it! Imagine if you had my 2007 Dakar and the fault had first occured after the warranty had expired.


    Michael
  16. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    The obvious answer is two bikes. I only use my old R80GS Basil with 125k for adventure rides and the "new" R1150GS with 173k for touring and commuting. Last time Basil gave me a fright when I pressed the starter. He started right up, a bit wheezy at first, but he kept going, no worries :-). I've I get really into a bind, there is always my wife's F650GS twin, that never misses a beat.
  17. Box'a'bits

    Box'a'bits In need of repair

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    New bikes – all the parts are at the beginning of their lifecycle. Unless there is a faulty part (Michael), every thing works as a system. Unfortunately Michael's Dakar seemed to be a system of broken parts.... :wink:

    Airheads are fairly under stressed, & so should go on for a long time if properly maintained. So Padmei’s approach of recondition it, & then leave it to get on with it should work. But that system thing sometimes can catch you out.

    I do like looking at the scenery. Excess speed (especially on the road) doesn’t do it for me. More modern bikes just don’t ring my bell much - possibly because I’m too old, slow, & unfit to make the best of them. The KTM probably created some incorrect assumptions about my riding abilities. Imagine what it would have been like if I had gotten the 950.

    I have had Boxers for a long time now, so am comfortable with them. I do prefer to ride them.

    I really like the comradeship / friendship that Adventure riding has given me. That for me has been a big reward. And worldwide there is a big group of top guys & girls that are similarly into their Airheads

    Gus is pretty unique, but he’s just a hobby. I don’t ride him every day, or weekend, or even every month. Gus is a passion - & he shouldn’t become a vice – like gambling or alcohol. So I probably shouldn’t be sneaking in bits, or hiding the Visa bill (like I do…). I probably need to remember that more (& maybe shouldn’t show this admission to Mandy)….

    I like spannering on Gus, where what I am doing:

    1. Results in an improvement (IMHO);
    2. Represents the culmination of a period of ‘figuring out a solution’.

    Realistically he is evolving over time. But becoming less & less standard. That may become an issue. I expect to get a long service life from Gus.

    Some of the more disposable bikes need money tossed at them earlier in their lives, because it just wouldn’t be economic to do so later.

    I hate being in a situation (like recently) where the so called improvements are backward steps, & I dislike (intensely) being in a situation where all I can see is further money to be spent. I have goals for what I am doing & I want to reach them.

    If Gus isn’t running well, I’d rather fix it (now) than put up with a fault. But recently I think I’ve given an impression of unreliability, which I hate. Jetting is tweaking..

    He’s also old, so geriatric issues will arise from time to time. I need to accept that

    I’m probably too impatient to always get the finer cosmetics right.

    I have learned a heap working on Boxers :deal

    I'd love to have two (working) bikes, but realistically that isn't going to be a happening thing for a bit...
  18. innathyzit

    innathyzit AKA Woodman

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    Are you thinking of upgrading?

    EDIT. Sposed to go before your big post so ignore it.

    Your philosophy on Gus is similar to me and the KLR. Never going to sell it as its worth sweet FA. Also I like just slowly improving something as I go along, sorta personalises it to me.

    Yea yea its a KLR not an airhead.
  19. Box'a'bits

    Box'a'bits In need of repair

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    That post was in response to something Padmei posted over on Olds Cool...:lol3
    But the same rules apply. Heaps of knowledge out there, long model run (so parts aren't an issue), relatively understressed, so should just keep on going with the proper care.
  20. msmckeon

    msmckeon Just ahead of the sweeps

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    I am a railway engineer, in NZ, so I am familiar with aging equipment. Sometimes maintenance and even repairs are not enough and you have to do a complete renewal of an old locomotive, multiple unit or other piece of equipment. Zero time everything, remove corrosion, make modifications andf re-plumb and re-wire. Otherwise you just travel from one part or system failure to another, with each causing its own service failure on another day, day after day.

    Time for a life extension overhaul of Schimidt, rather than running repairs!

    Michael