Across Americas - Discovering the New World on a motorcycle

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by AnjinSan, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. Truenorth2005

    Truenorth2005 Been here awhile

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    Hi Alex & Andreea
    Yes, a tubless tire can be patched from the inside. A good tire guy should be able to get you patched up to get you to somewhere that you can buy a tire. How many KM's on the new tires before this happened? What kind of a blade? Was it still in the tire when you got stopped? Good thing you went to the tire repair seminar at the Horizans Unlimited rally.
    Stay safe.
    Bill & Brenda
  2. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    http://www.seccionamarilla.com.mx/resultados/motos/chihuahua/1


  3. AnjinSan

    AnjinSan Been here awhile

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    guys, thanks for the clarifications. So a tubeless tire can be patched from the inside. So, right now the tire is patched with 2 patching sticky strings side by side. And it seems to hold air. It got us 50 kilometers from the middle of nowhere in a beautiful mountain pass, to this little town called San Juanito. From here to Chihuahua there are areound 250 kilometers.
    Now, should I try to reach Chihuahua with the current patching (on the reasoning that if it held air for 50 kilometers it will hold for 250 kilomteres)? Or should I try first to find a guy in San Juanito that knows what he's doing and patch it from the inside?

    @Tom: thank you for the list. I was finding online and writing down some of them as well.

    @Bill: the tire was practically brand new :( just changed it in Fresno and was looking strong. It was a Michelin Anakee 2, as the previous one (which held for 12000 miles). The balde was part of a metal piece of equipment I guess. Very strange looking, courvy, likfe a quarter of a circle and 1.5 inch wide. It was all in when I stopped. the air was leaking but slowly so I stopped when I felt something was wrong in the back.


    Despite all this, I just wanted to add that we are having a great time here in Mexico. The scenery is gourgeous and people have been very friendly so far. We hope to meet nice people from here on as well.

    Thanks again for all the suggestions. I guess tomorrow I'll head out towards Chihuahua.
  4. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Buenes noche amigo
  5. cyberdos

    cyberdos Easy Bonus Loop

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    Hi Alex. Sorry to hear about your misfortunes but things could be worse. You'll find that you will hear two very polarizing answers to your question. Some people simply will not use a patched/plugged tire. Others will ride on one until the treads starts showing. I am of the latter camp. I have ridden thousands of kilometers on an array of plugged tires without any issue. As a matter of fact right now I am on a rear that has over 6,500 kilometers on it after being plugged on the side of the highway in a remote area in Colorado. :)

    So my vote is for you to keep a close eye on the tire. Check the pressure with the same gauge under similar conditions. What I mean by that is if you are checking the pressure in cold always check it in cold. You should be doing this daily but I sometimes fail to heed my own advice. :lol3 If the tire is not losing pressure for a day or two you can safely ride it to where you can either path or replace. Being that it's such a new tire I'd go with patching.

    Once you get the tire patched from the inside you should be set. The patch will become part of the tire and you shouldn't have any issue for the remainder of the life of the tire. That, of course, is right before it snags a nail. :lol3

    Good luck my friends and I'm glad you are having fun.
  6. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

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    I've put 18,000kms once on a tire that was first patched with a sticky string and then patched from the inside.
    Mexican tire repair shops know how and when they can apply a vulcanized interior patch. I've never been to a tire shop here where the guy doing the repairs has made a decision I wouldn't trust. If they tell you it can be done, they will do it and they won't charge you very much.
    The repaired tire I had, I used down to the cords here on Mexican roads.
    If you are looking for a new tire, prices will vary considerably depending on where you shop. Usually, dealers will charge you a small fortune, especially the Japanese bike dealers, however, there are usually at least a few good accessory shops that have common sized tires in stock and will direct you to a good place for mounting, but balancing can be harder to find. If you want to buy bike parts in Mexico in a city you don't know, ask the pizza delivery guys or the other delivery guys who use their bikes all day, every day. They, or the manager of where they work, will usually recommend a place.
    In Mexico, you will often find the MotoMundo locales, but they are always the most expensive, other than the dealer.
    MotoMart locations are usually cheaper but you might save a few pesos by shopping around but it isn't worth it sometimes. I've seen some tires here cheaper than in the US.
  7. SR

    SR Long timer

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    You can patch the inside of a tire. That is the correct way to do it. The only problem is that if the patch is too big it can throw the tire out of balance. Most automotive tire shops wont have the correct equipment to mount and dismount motorcycles tires, so they may scratch your rim. If you are concerned about that, you may ask around or go to a good motorcycle shop.

    For a new tire in Chihuahua try these guys. There are probably the biggest shop in Chihuahua and deal with big bikes not pizza delivery bikes.

    www.motoconexxion.com

    One of the best rides in Mexico is from Creel down to Parral through Guachochi. You are not too far away. If you get your tire fixed, It's almost worth back tracking from Chihuahua city for.

    If you are heading south to Durango, a shop here has a Metzler 19" front for 3,500 pesos and should have a Metzler 17' rear in tomorrow for 4,000 pesos. Shinkos are in stock and cost 2,000 for front and 2,500 for rear. Maybe that will help you decide what to do.

    Suerte
    SR
  8. AnjinSan

    AnjinSan Been here awhile

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    ¡Muchas gracias, guys, for all the suggestions

    We put an inside patch at a local tire repair shop and they insured us that we can go on with it. Of course, there was no balancing but I hope that the patch didn't do too much to umbalance the tire.

    While I was out searching for tire shops, Andreea tried to find a new tire in Chihuahua, the owners of the hotel we are staying at called many motorcycle shops in Chihuahua City but couldn't find our size available for today. So I don't thing there is any point in riding today there (as weekend is coming as well). We will try and ride with the patch towards Parral and Durango, hoping that we will find a new tire on our way in these bigger cities.

    Today will be just a short day, to Creel and we will check the tire pressure in the evening and tomorrow morning. If all OK we will try to reach Parral as SR was suggesting, via Ruta 23 to Guachochi and onwards. If we stick to pavement and if the tire pressure holds today it should be OK until we reach a place with a new tire.

    This tire was brand new almost but still, and I am willing to travel with the patch for a while, but if we find a good opportunity (price and tire type) I would be much more relaxed with a new tire in the back.

    Once in Creel today we will try to phone some more shops in Parral. If not maybe Durango would be our safest bet.


    ¡Hasta pronto
  9. Ramata

    Ramata Wind

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    Anjin,
    I just read your message and tried to find a tire for you, but unfortunately the only tire close to this size is an AVON AM26R, if you want go for it or get your tire repaired locally PM me.
  10. AnjinSan

    AnjinSan Been here awhile

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    We are in Creel after a swift 30 km ride. I think the shorted day in our trip so far. The good news is that we stopped because we wanted to not because we had to :) The tire patch seems to hold. Indeed I forgot to mention that we had the problem on the back tire.

    Tomorrow we will go around a bit, but no riding to the bottom of the canyon for us though...

    Then the day after tomorrow we should be on our way to Parral and then Durango.

    @SR yeah it would be great to meet up in Durango. We might get there on Monday or on Tuesday. I'll give you a PM closer on.

    @Ramata: thank you so much for trying to find it. We did as well phoning from San Juanito but the same limited success. It would have been nice to meet in Chihuahua but maybe some day, under better circumstances :freaky
  11. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Good that you are back in business. Just remember that if it was easy, everyone would be doing it.

    looking forward to more of your RR and interested in your take on Hwy 20

    Abrazos a de tus amigos en Banamichi and remind Andreea to eat yogurt.
  12. AnjinSan

    AnjinSan Been here awhile

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    Since today we had some free time in Creel, we had some time for a new entry. So I hope you will enjoy Utah and Arizona.
    -----------------------------------------------------------

    Utah and Arizona: September 16 – 19

    We are going to Utah (that’s North of Las Vegas) but first we go…. South. We take a small detour to see Hoover Dam. We find a view point on the new bridge built as a safety measure so that the big trucks won’t pass on the dam. I admit this is a big, impressive dam and every time I will see an action movie with Special OPs descending on the dam I will be able to say “Ah, I’ve been there”.
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    We didn’t spend too much time there but we did get into Arizona by foot from there and that is because the dam is between Nevada and Arizona. It is time to head North so we get back to Nevada, to the parking lot where the motorcycle is parked. Utah, here we come.
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    We notice that the sky is full of clouds. Really, it’s gonna rain in Nevada?!?!?
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    We are going to Ivins, where the friends of our friends in Monterey are waiting for us. It is not far so we enjoy every kilometer.​
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    The sun is descending and manages to trick the clouds and saturate the red of the cliffs.​
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    When the light is perfect for taking pictures we are usually worried with “where are we gonna camp”. This time we know we don’t have to worry so we are enjoying the lines and colors.​
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    We don’t get to Ivins, Brent and Pam live in a very special neighborhood, in the desert, at the bottom of a canyon. What makes it special? Let me show you.​
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    The background is fabulous and the positioning scenic but what do these houses have? Or don’t have? Well, they don’t have posts. Actually there are no wires that you can see and no sewer.​
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    Houses have no upstairs and they all borrow the natural colors that surrounds the area. Even the antennas are tinny and same color as the house.​
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    The inside of the house may be comfortable, luxurious according to the owner’s budget but on the inside there is no extravaganza. Sun goes down over the desert houses and we go outside to see this:​
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    The night is silent. No music from your neighbor, no barbecue smoke. Your hearing is fine, you can still hear the band of crickets.​
    Why is this possible? Common visions? Maybe. But actually when you buy land over there you accept the rules of the land. It is your property but you cannot do whatever you want with/ on it. For instance, the house cannot take more than 25% of the property.​
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    Before you start building, you put poles on the premises the house will be built and your neighbors have a certain period of time to decide if the height or position of the house is ok with them. If it is not, you start the discussions or go back to the design phase.​
    Staying with Brent and Pam was a good chance for us to glance at a different kind of world. Water has a different shade of blue in the middle of the desert and windows seem cleaner when you see red cliffs through them.​
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    But as many times before, we were impressed by the people and we learn something else from every place we stay at.​
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    Next we will visit two natural parks, Zion in Utah and Grand Canyon in Arizona.​
    Are we in Cappadochia?​
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    The oriental adventure is far away now. We are in America. The America we used to see on TV in the ’90 with cowboys and canyons.​
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    We didn’t see any cowboys but we had to leave our “horse” at the entrance in Zion and take… the bus.
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    I was telling you in an earlier post that we enjoyed Yosemite but didn’t like it that it was packed with cars and people. Apparently it was the same in Zion before 2000 when the park administration decided to deny access to cars/ RVs/ motorcycles or any other type of vehicle. You want to visit the park? Very well, leave your vehicle at the entrance and take one of the shuttle buses with several stops along the way. Easy and efficient.
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    I cannot say that Zion is more spectacular than Yosemite, they are just different. But for sure Zion was more peaceful and we left from there more relaxed.
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    We continue Southwards and even the road is readish in this parts.
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    And what a road! It is a pleasure following it along the ridges.
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    It seems like under this rocks a history of milenia is hiding. The New World maybe for us, but a very old world indeed…
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    The tarmac sneaks out intro the prairies opening out the views.
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    And down the road we see, yet another time, that the journey can take many forms but the important thing is to keep walking!
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    We cannot take him with us, but at least we hope that the the rain will not catch him. Finally after the last few days of clouds in Nevada and in Utah, the rain shows itself in… Arizona.
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    And because nothing was blocking my view I could follow the movement of the coulds and their wet traces on the earth over the vast planes. I felt like in one of those old ATARI games, where you need to run from the phantoms in a labyrinth.
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    While trying to dodge the rain showers we pass by a rare thing. So here it goes: the RV is not a mini-bus and it doesn’t pull behind a bad ass SUV but a small and funny car. It even had the matching colors. How cool is that!
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    We follow the route which takes us to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. And with us Autumn was riding…
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    And here it is. The Great Canyon. Well known, well marketed. So we were expecting greatness. And still we remain speechless when we reach the rim. The pictures don’t do it justice but let’s try with a few:
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    We like it so much there that we are willing to splurge on a room in the lodge that was just on the edge of the canyon. They didn’t had any room left so, 100 dollars “saved”, we track our way back and with us the last rays of sun leave the national park.
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    In the night, lighting struck fall around us and light up sky and earth. But our camera is long gone in the tankbang while we are rushing for a dry place to sleep. We have the opportunity to escape yet again the big rains and find a cheap place to call it a day.
    During the last days we’ve traveled through some amazing wonders of nature. Thoughts run between what we’ve seen in the past and what we hope to see from now on in the future. Tomorrow will be a new day, for everyone.
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    Next time we continue to discover Arizona, we spend some time on Route 66, and we see how plans made have to change when we reach the border with Mexico. Stay tuned!
  13. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

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    Your photos capture my thoughts of how the old wild west used to be, in the 1700 through late 1800s',before settlements were established.
  14. SS in Vzla.

    SS in Vzla. Totally Normal? I'm not!

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    The patch is the normal way of repairing tubeless tires in Latin America (vulcanized patch) . Don't worry about it any more, if it has not leaked it will hold on for the duration of the tire's thread... The low speeds you'll be riding won't really show if the tire is unbalanced either.

    But, I'd buy a tube just in case it happens again, so you can get out to civilization. As I'm sure the extra space on the bike is very limited, you can buy a 19 inch tube for the front tire and in case you need it for an emergency, just put it in the rear tire... not ideal, just some extra insurance.

    Drum bun
  15. wegimex

    wegimex Adventurer

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    Don´t forget your posts. Starving for more ! Enjoy Mexico ! It´s addictive for many. Enjoying your views a lot ! :D
  16. AnjinSan

    AnjinSan Been here awhile

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    @wegimex: hehe I am trying to get up to date with the story but it is so hard with all the nice riding and so many places to see. I end up writing in the night most of the times. So please excuse my mistakes...

    Here it goes... the next episode:


    Mexico, but not quite there yet: 20 September – 2 October


    The morning finds us humming a famous Romanian songs that goes like “In Arizona I was born on horse saddle / From her arms my mother lost me when she was going to the salon” Well as you know, once you start the day with a song in your head… it is so hard to get rid of it.
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    Near Page we find an interesting message:
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    OK, so we might not have the money to own a million dollar view, but at least let’s see it. So we look around. Maybe is this one?
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    Oh I think this is not the view that the potential buyers are looking for. Let’s search some more…​
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    That’s better. And look, already two owners of the million dollar view. Hmm does this mean that each of them gets only 500 000 dollars worth of view? Eah… we must be just jealous. So we prefer to move on and soon enough we are in Navajo reservation.​
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    Well I do not know much about these reservations and how things work but for me something is very strange. Even the name, “Reservation” seems demeaning for me. Why free independent people would like to leave in a “reservation” with fences and barb wire and signs? And why would such places exist in the “most democratic country in the world”? And do these people really live better there? We just passed form one side to another but we so just a huge wasteland and small humble houses from place to place. Maybe further in the reservation things are better. Maybe…​
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    And why there is a need to separate (segregate) people (be them indians or other nation) in the XXI century? That has such an old smell to it… What kind of life do they have in the desert there?We so no farm land, no crops groing (it was desert) a lot of litter and stray dogs. But all of the houses had TV dish. Let’s not forget about the important things in life, eh?​
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    But again, forgive the ramblings of someone who doesn’t know all the details. I am sure the situation is much more complicated. We admire also the canyons created by the Little Colorado. Little little but he means business.​
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    And because we’ve anjoyed so much the North Rim of the Great Canyon we decide to have run also for the South Rim. We go around the crowded areas and find a nice spot where we can admire the view in silence.​
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    Our next target is Flagstaff and another piece of American history: Route 66. The legendary road, created at the beginning of XXst century used to unite Chicago with the extreme West in California. Now decommissioned with the introduction of the interstate system, the road is still a touristic attraction.​
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    From Flagstaff we are dashing through the Arizona heat towards Phoenix where Julio,From Flagstaff we are dashing through the Arizona heat towards Phoenix where Julio, a fellow ADVrider, was waiting for us.
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    From Phoenix you almost can feel that the border is close. It is right there, across the desert. We start to get a little bit nervous about the crossing.​
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    We spend one day preparing a bit. I change the oil and the oil filter, go and make some copies of our documents for the border formalities and so on. Time flies so fast that we don’t even get to see the downtown Phoenix. So the only “Phoenix picutres” are related to “interstate beauty”​
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    But we are not sorry that we miss the crazy town traffic. Julio stays in such a nice place and we find everything that we need close by. And his garage is well equipped with tools. We have a blat staying with him and his family.​
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    We say thank you to Kim, Antonio and Julio for all their generosity. Little that we knew how soon I would see them again.​
    We depart for Bisbee, a small border town (former mining town now artist and bohemian town). But on the road we first make detour to see a big open copper mine.​
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    The site is really impressive. But one cannot help to wonder if it was worth it. If the big, sterile hole will ever be again just nature. Probably not​
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    The site has a place for visitors, where you can see a wheel from the trucks used to haul the rocks. It is very big and very expensive. 20 000 dollars for a new tire. How’s that for economy?​
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    Above all the technology and all the gained resources, what is left behind is just a wasted land. Nothing grows here.​
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    It is impressive what humans can do and how destructive our race can be, if we are not careful. And last time I’ve checked we still one single place we can call “home”. Maybe we should find another planet. Soon…​
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    In Bisbee we meet Adam and his wife Karen, them too friends from advrider. We quickly find a place for Gunnar in the garage near his 2 bikes a Moto Guzzi and a KTM LC4 which Adam is preparing for a trip up to Alaska.​
    As Bisbee is really close to the border Adam say that we might go this evening to Naco and get the paper work done so that next day we would just pass through. Excellent plan. let’s go.​
    We reach the border, leave the car on the American side, walk over to the Mexican side and basically we need to take care of two things:​
    1. get a visa for us​
    2. get a motorcycle permit that will allow us to drive through Mexico.​
    At point 1 we trye to convince the customs officer that there is an agreement between Romania and Mexico and we should not pay for our tourist visas. And since we are the very first Romanians that try to cross through Naco, the guy is really in a though spot. He tries to do some research but with no success. In the end we pay the visas as it was getting close to closing hour and we wanted to solve also point number 2.
    We move to the next building where a very nice young lady smiles and she even knows some English. Oh, this will be easy I’m thinking. And it looks simple. I need to hand over the newly acquired visas vehicle registration, passport and driver’s license. OK, here you go. Hmm wait. Where is my driving license? I cannot find it in my wallet.
    Ashamed, I gather my other documents and return home. On the road Adam and Karen try to cheer us up but we are really worried. How could we be so stupid to lose it? And where could it be? We search all our luggage without any success. I know where it is. We forgot it in the Staples copy center when we were doing the copies to cross into Mexico. Ironic, isn’t it?
    I call next day the store and a wonder happens, the driver’s license was found by an employee and kept safe. I am so happy. Thank you so much sir, I will be right there to take it. Thank you!
    Oh and when I say I’ll be right there… I mean 200 miles later right there. I was prepared for a long day riding on the highway. But that didn’t matter, what matter was that I could recuperate my license. And then… Adam says, you know I could come with you. And even better, we could drive the car so we can talk and spend the time more pleasantly. How incredible is that? Instead of having a rest on his Sunday, this friend prefers to spend his free day in a car with me, driving around to Phoenix and back. What else could I say? We end up having a typical American road trip with muzic, nice conersations, stops on the side of the highway to have burgers for lunch. It was fun.
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    We meet Julio who went in the store and took my license from there. So we get to see each other again one more time. That was nice. We return to Bisbee in good spirits stopping one more time to eat an American burger (on the road we determined that I didn’t had much luck at the border until now because last night I didn’t had a burger and my last meal in the U.S. had to be a burger…)​
    Oh and I forgot to mention, the trip was also awesome because we go to ride in this Yellow furry of speed:​
    [​IMG] Photo courtesy of Adam

    Yellow Fiat 500 with red break calipers. It does not get much cooler than that.​
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    We tried again to get the moto permit. But again we had no chance at Naco border crossing. For some reason they couldn’t verify my VIN into their computer data base. I was told that I should try at another border crossing. A bigger one.​
    So we return back home, still without all the papers for crossing the border but at least with all the needed documents, finding the girls in good spirit after they had a relaxing day in Bisbee.​
    We spend a peaceful evening at Adam’s talking and making plans and the next day we leave wishing them “che te vaya bien”.​
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    We turn our bike Eastwards heading for Douglas. In the morning cold air, our thoughts are already in Mexico. We hope that this time customs formalities will finally be OK and we will be as well, in Mexico.​
    Next time we will find out how difficult was the border crossing on our third try and how were our first days in Mexico. Stay tuned!
  17. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Another great write up, thanks. (and Adam, we missed you over the weekend)
  18. Emperor Norton

    Emperor Norton Kilroy was here

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    Sorry, just started reading this, but is your name from the James Clavell novel Shogun? I seem to recall a certain Brit stuck in colonial Japan dealing with his Catholic adversaries the Portuguese.
  19. AnjinSan

    AnjinSan Been here awhile

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    JoeDuck, yes! You are right the nickname is coming from Shogun novel. I think you are just the second fellow advrider to notice this :)
    He was a Brit pilot serving on a Dutch ship. Hehe... books from the childhood :)
  20. Merlin III

    Merlin III Long timer

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    Just to set your mind at ease, American Indians have full citizenship rights and have the right to live anywhere they want within their particular economic constraints, just like the rest of us.