Aerostich 'armor'....

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by SF_Rider, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. nhbubba

    nhbubba Internet Tough Guy

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    How do the pad holders on RC suits work? I gather the RC Light suits have velcro in pockets for the knee/shoulder/elbow armor. Is this how the regular RC suits work too? Or are those sewn in pockets?
    #41
  2. HeatXfer

    HeatXfer Bad knees

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    That's because that's what it is. lol
    #42
  3. JTT

    JTT Long timer

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    Regular RC suits have pockets sewn into the lining. Since the "lights" don't have lining, it would seem they went the way that the Darien suits do with separate pockets. Hip pads in regular RC fit into separate pockets like Light and Darien.
    #43
  4. JTT

    JTT Long timer

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    ...and all the others are just a slab of rubber. :rolleyes
    #44
  5. V-Tom

    V-Tom Been here awhile

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    I understood it gets harder when hit hard. I haven't seen anyone mention that in this thread but have heard of many crashes where the riders seemed to fair very well wearing Aerostich suits with Aerostich armour.

    Was I mistaken about this ability?

    ..Tom
    #45
  6. nashopolis

    nashopolis Been here awhile

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    I think people appreciate the whole package with aerostich
    Wearability, good abrasion resistance and seam strength along with the padding in the right places - all are important for the gear to do its job.

    But the armor is not the highest rated armor out there anymore. Sas tech, t-pro and a few others absorb more energy

    What's good enough? Most armor out there still transfers enough force to break bones according to lab tests I've seen.
    Only the highest rated armor begins to adequately dampen hard direct strikes in controlled test conditions.

    In real life lots of folks seem happy with aero and other products in their own crash testing. You pay your money and take your chances it seems. The best armor looks a lot like a car.
    #46
  7. stegs

    stegs Been here awhile

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    I crashed into a rockfall wearing my Spidi gear -- came down on one elbow and broke the armor. Also the elbow.

    I would much rather it had been in my RC1 -- spongy though the armor may be I can't help but feel I would have been better off.
    #47
  8. V-Tom

    V-Tom Been here awhile

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    I know I am happy with my Roadcrafter. My question was in response to someone saying that the armour is just a piece of foam. I think that the foam in armour is much more than just foam (or a cheese sandwich for that matter.)

    ..Tom
    #48
  9. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b

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    No you were not mistaken. The harder you hit that seemingly limp piece of foam, the harder it resists.

    One side effect is that the "normal" 'stich armor becomes very stiff at cooler temperatures. It's awkward to put on cold Aerostich gear and try to function until the pads warm up a bit. But it's not so bad that I have tried their cold weather pad set.

    Most plain foam rubber stays pliable in a wider range of temperatures, but doesn't provide the shock absorption of viscoelastic foam like the stuff from Aerostich.
    #49
  10. nhbubba

    nhbubba Internet Tough Guy

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    The 2-piece I ordered last week arrived today. I ordered a Roadcrafter with the 'TF3' armor plus the extra 'competition' hip pads. I passed on the back protection as I will use a Knox back protector that I bought for the track days, at least for a while. I broke the bank buying the suit and will probably have to wait until nest year for the back protector.

    I am very impressed with the pads. They feel substantial and cover very well. To my untrained eye, they are 100x better than anything I have in any of my Tourmaster or Cortech gear. Even my Teknic gear feels flimsy in comparison.

    Pending a real test, which I hope never happens, I believe this stuff is good 'nuf for me.


    I believe I received the hip pads installed in the pockets backwards. The velcro tabs were facing the inside of the convex shape of the pads. This meant I needed to fold the tab at the top over to hang the pads in the suit. Also the opening of the pocket was facing into the suit.

    Reversing the pads in the pockets makes them fit in a much more sensible way. I think.
    #50
  11. thetable

    thetable Long timer

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    I'd look at some of the alternative back protection that still velcros into the suit. With the back protector velcrod into the suit, it makes it much easier to don and doff. I've been using the giant 'Stich back protector most of the time, but I find my other BPs much more comfortable and cooler.

    I've tested mine a few times, and have been very pleased. While they may not qualify for whatever ratings, they protect very well, and the additional size makes the likelihood of them being in the right place and the right time much more likely.
    #51
  12. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    for most folks, the aerostich stuff works just fine, mine saved my shoulder after a deer took the bike out from under me.
    if you're that scared about riding, sell your bike and stay buckled in your fucking minivan.
    Christ, lot's of us grew up riding in a simple leather or belstaff jacket, no armor, jeans, and work boots. yep, we lived and are still riding today. saying that, almost all the quality gear available today is much, much better than what we used years ago.
    just get something that fits, is comfortable, and WEAR IT!
    #52
  13. nhbubba

    nhbubba Internet Tough Guy

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    Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. Less crap to mess with suiting up means less crap left behind in the closet.

    Any thoughts on which alternatives should be on my short-list?

    Who said anything about being worried? I just want the most for my (enormous sum of) money.
    #53
  14. thetable

    thetable Long timer

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    #54
  15. nhbubba

    nhbubba Internet Tough Guy

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    Forgot about that. Good call. I like the transit pocket + sas-tec combo.. and it is budget friendly.

    [​IMG]
    #55
  16. max384

    max384 Bandaided

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    I've never liked the idea of back armor that is attached to the jacket. It doesn't give me any confidence at all. I'm so used to wearing my stand-alone back protector that I'd feel naked without it. It's hot in the summer and wrinkles clothes (which is a downside since I commute), but the tradeoffs are worth the protection IMO.
    #56
  17. nhbubba

    nhbubba Internet Tough Guy

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    I'm used to not wearing any back protection at all outside of the ~1/8" foam sheet you find in most entry level jackets. So a substantial sewn or velcroed in pad is a serious step up for me.

    At some point your threshold for safety and simplicity need to meet a compromise. That will obviously be different for each of us.
    #57
  18. thetable

    thetable Long timer

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    On a jacket, no, but on a onesie, it's pretty solid.
    #58
  19. HeatXfer

    HeatXfer Bad knees

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    I replaced the 'funky foam' in the knees & elbows of my Roadcrafter with replacement hard armor pieces for Vanson & Dainese leathers I found in the bargain bin at Scuderia. They fit in the existing armor pockets with minor alterations - no velcro, just a couple stitches keep'em in place.

    Whatever happened to Sorbathane?
    #59
  20. Mens Rea

    Mens Rea Been here awhile

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    I've got the Bohn that fits the Roadcrafter, off the Bohn website for $70 or so. When the pants aren't zipped on the bottom piece of Velcro attaches to the jacket, but when the pants are zipped on then the Velcro attaches to the pants. I tend to leave everything assembled.

    When I got my R/C it didn't have any back armor. Then I got a BMW Comfortshell (yes, used; nice jacket. I wear it with Darien pants) and it has a big back protector in it, and got used to having one, and wanted one for the R/C. I would say the Bohn is a bit bulky, it took my 46s jacket from being a little big with layers under it to pretty snug.
    #60