After the crash- Getting back on

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by dm635, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    12,366
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    I went down at 50 mph, slid about 25 feet on pavement. Remember it all. Saw my bike flip 360* in front of me. Felt my helmet hit the pavement and recall thinking, "Oh, that's why I wear a helmet."

    A motorist couple passing by that saw the whole thing were staring down into my helmet when I opened my eyes. I do recall that I thought I should move slowly, find out if I have movement. So I wiggled my toes and flexed my legs. Then all of a sudden I sat up. The couple were startled a little. They helped me retrieve my bike from the ditch. I set it up on the edge of the road and picked up pieces of the windshield. I was digging the dirt out from between the fins when a cop showed up. He was amazed that I was moving around. He fortunately never asked for Drivers License or other papers. I had insurance but no Motorcycle Endorsement in those days. I commented that I would be heading South on Rt 1 instead of 95 since I did realize I was shaken. I rode home, maybe 15 miles. As I was leaving the Fire Dept showed up. I waved and hollered to them that I was OK.

    The next day I started to ache. Holes in the elbow of leather jacket, but that jacket saved me much more injury. Elbow was badly scrapped. Hip was also scrapped some. I limped for a year after this.

    I was going too fast for the ramp I was trying take onto the Interstate. I had been a much faster rider almost 15 years before but now after not riding for too many years I had to learn to ride all over again.

    I'm single. It's a different World for most if they are married.

    Edit: I had to ad this later because this is the thing you wanted to know about. I said that I was conscious. This is true. I remember going down, sliding on the pavement, hitting my head and seeing the bike flip over. I lost consciousness for a minute or more after I came to rest. But I never lost any memory of anything leading up to this point.
    #21
  2. dm635

    dm635 I Roll

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    382
    Location:
    Louisville Ky-actually 30 miles east
    Thank you for sharing your experiences, especially the not remembering part. At least I know I'm not crazy. And to be honest I'm so glad I don't remember using my face for brakes. Had my gear on, thick Carhartt jacket, boots, gloves, glasses & the wrong helmet. The 3/4 helmet caused the left side of my face to be a scab with plenty of stitchs. Going to have a few scars especially where muscle was stitched together before skin. I'm no beauty queen so not worried about the new marks. Have started to grow my 1st gotee to cover what was left on the chin..Never found a comfortable full face helmet, but won't get back on without one. I know my gear wasn't the recommended wear, that'll have to change as well. But at least I was wearing something. The only wear through on the jacket was a small spot on the left shoulder. Everything was cutoff on the helicopter ride, don't remember that either. Perhaps a rational person would be satisfied to be on their feet with everything working & hang up the helmet, but I am under the mindset that I must continue to ride.
    #22
  3. Moonshiner

    Moonshiner aka "B-dog"

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    185
    Location:
    Twin Cities of Minne-snow-tah
    I started riding at 13, stopped at 21 when I moved from a rural area to an urban area. I was newly married, lived in an apartment, and it just wasn't practical at that time to have motorcycle riding in my life. At 16, on a dirt road in the middle of nowhere, I met a pickup pulling a horse trailer, a neighbor of ours. No problem, huge dirt cloud, I could get through this. But his hired man driving the '64 Impala didn't see me, didn't stay to his side of the road, and my left knee hit his driver's side fender. Recovery was 82 days in the hospital, and 6 months on crutches after that. With some obvious mixed feelings, my dad decided that we could fix my motorcycle. I rode it until I moved to the city.

    I took about 19 years off. When we moved to our first house, our backyard neighbor was a diehard BMW rider, airhead at that (oilheads weren't around yet, this was 1980). I lived my motorcycling life vicariously through him, watching him work on his bikes, listening to his tales of all the rallies. It just wasn't the right time for me to return to motorcycling; I had small children, was busy at work, money was fairly tight, etc. etc. Then, in 1999, I decided to return to riding. First I bought an '84 700 Shadow, then I bought a '77 R100RS, which I still own. This was followed by a '77 R100S and a '94 R1100RS. My wife was not happy about me riding, but didn't protest too loudly, since she knew I enjoyed it, it made me happy, and frankly, I didn't have any other habits or vices to worry about.

    In 2007, I rear-ended a van that was stopped in traffic, or should I say, stopped rather quickly without the benefit of brakelights. I did this on my RS, and we all know how wonderful those brakes are. Bottom line, I should've left more room ahead of me, I should've been paying closer attention. The good news is that I was completely geared up, and as I tumbled through the air, I landed on my stomach, right on the centerline of the highway, and looked up to see the oncoming traffic parting as Moses did the Red Sea. I was stiff and sore, but that was it. My wife was furious, sick to her stomach, and just plain not happy at all about the situation.

    I had my backup "S" to ride while the RS was being repaired. It took me a couple of months to get my riding "mojo" back. My wife has never ridden behind me, she has her motorcycle endorsement and has her own scooter, that she rides infrequently. That said, she'll very likely never ride behind me, which I regret, but on the other hand, that ship has sailed, so I'm not going to push it.

    So, to the OP...good for you for fixing up the R80. We want to keep the airheads around as long as possible. As for should you get back on...that's up to you entirely. You're already back on, it sounds like, and aren't riding scared. This is good. How's your wife handling it? Is she OK with it? Does it bother her? How about your children? Do they have any input? As much as I absolutely love to ride motorcycles, it's not worth my wife having constant anxiety when I ride. At this point, my wife is pretty much OK with it, but I know deep down that if I quit riding tomorrow, she wouldn't be shedding any tears.
    #23
  4. isdt BMW

    isdt BMW willserv@aol.com

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    334
    Location:
    N. E. Ohio
    Riding my hot rod R69S with dustbin fairing, rearsets,cam driven tach, original paint, lady ran light, I stood up and said OhS--t, landed 80 down street in ditch. broken femur, 504 stitches. don't remember flying or landing, never passed out. A week in hospital. Been riding since I was 11, I was 48 when I wrecked, 64 how, was only off a bike for 6 weeks, repaired the bike with good original paint parts, a buddy peiced the fairing back together, still riding it. My wife of 44 years was really supportive and knows that riding and restoring are my passion. If you are not comfortable, take some time away from it, for me motorcycling is theripy.
    #24
  5. dm635

    dm635 I Roll

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    Oddometer:
    382
    Location:
    Louisville Ky-actually 30 miles east
    Congrats to all for getting back on. Our hobby has some extreme danger involved. I have 3 children aged 21 to 29. They all came to the hospital once alerted. Wife says my son (26) climbed in the bed with me for a whole day. I was out for 2 days. Wife says I seemed very alert while they were stiching up my face. My son has expressed strongly that he doesn't want me back on. We are good buds & he knows my intentions. I'd have to say it was a traumatic experience to anyone that saw me those 1st couple of days. I was road meat. Friends came too immediately when called. The riders understand my getting back on, though didn't like seeing me that way.

    That is why I've said my decision does effect others, some more than others. My family in Houston Has also expressed that I'm done.

    Just last night the wife saw a Honda commercial for small riders. I'm now a 1st time grandfather with a 13 month old grandson. She said not to even think about putting young Bishop on a bike when he grows. I replied that was for his daddy. Well daddies a motorhead & Bishop will grow up knowing about machines.

    I'm sure my wife knows now that I'll be back on in the wind. Even though we haven't talked about it. She knows it's in my blood. Can't remove it. I live in the country & love taking off for a hundred or so miles. Hate the traffic in Louisville & only deal with it when I have to.
    #25
  6. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,724
    Location:
    Jackson's Bottom Oregon
    It'll be a good argument that you'll always wear the best gear! I'm sure that will help a bunch. How much less would have been your injuries had you been wearing a full face helmet and gear with armor? Probably fairly minor.

    Now's the time to get David Hough's book Proficient Motorcycling, along with his more recent books:

    http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorcycling-Ultimate-Guide-Riding/dp/1889540536

    Used copies are certainly cheap enough!
    #26
  7. Moonshiner

    Moonshiner aka "B-dog"

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    185
    Location:
    Twin Cities of Minne-snow-tah
    For me personally, motorcycling is neither a sport nor a hobby. It's a form of transportation that I use during the months of April through November. Currently, I only ride on the street. When those streets become cold, slippery and/or snowy, then it's time to store the motorcycles for the season.

    Good Luck and Happy Riding, DM635. May you ride safe and may your family be worry free. Any time you're on the road, whether it be in 4 wheels or on 2, there are risks involved, everyone knows that. The issue is that, on 2 wheels, the results of a problem can be much more devastating. It's not where ANY of us ever want to be.
    #27