Airhead Exhaust Wrench

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by SUVslayer, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. opposedcyljunkie

    opposedcyljunkie Heavyweight Boxer

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    Great job! :clap
    #41
  2. Droptarotter

    Droptarotter Long timer

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    The bike looks great.....but.....I am not so sure about the absorbent mat in the airbox?

    Is it held down with anything? My concern is what are the chances of it being sucked into the motor?

    That red silicone is a No-No on any engine parts. Just think......... as much excess you see on the outside......there is usually that much excess on the inside. That silicone sealant does not mix well with oil.....so the excess could be floating around in your engine......hopefully it does not clog up any oil ports.

    In the future.......for engine sealant use something like Yamabond or I like Locktite 515......both are designed for this type of application.

    I hope these suggestions help.........you bike looks great none the less.

    Cheers
    #42
  3. SUVslayer

    SUVslayer Long timer

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    It's high temp silicone for engine gaskets, but after I tried it it just seemed wrong. I took the oil pan off and scraped the crap off. Live and learn. I'll use something different next time. I'll change the oil after 500 miles and see how it looks.

    As for the mat, I've got it stuck down, but I share your concern. It's gonna be a work in progress, and I'll have to see how it acts. I'm not concerned about it falling apart - it's pretty tough stuff. But flopping around and blocking an intake tube is a potential problem.
    #43
  4. squish

    squish Out of the office.

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    Where in SoCal are you at?

    I'm in Peeeedro.
    #44
  5. SUVslayer

    SUVslayer Long timer

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    miracle mile
    #45
  6. Beater

    Beater The Bavarian Butcher

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    This just might be my neurosis ... but you need to take it real easy on that engine while your new rigns are cutting in ... Like the first 100 miles nothin above 2500rpm ... and the next 400 nothin above 3500 ...

    There are all kinds of theories about cutting in rings ... and I am no expert ... but rings that don't seat correctly can really screw up the inside of your cylinders.

    Just take it easy for 500 miles and you should be fine ...

    PS - The bike looks GREAT :nod
    #46
  7. Yarddog

    Yarddog Been here awhile

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    So...how IS that Costco beer, anyway?
    #47
  8. SUVslayer

    SUVslayer Long timer

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    I'm definitely taking it very easy on the bike, but alas, it's hard to stay under 2500 rpm on the thing. But after riding it a little, I need to go back in and adjust valves, etc.

    Costco (kirkland) beer's not bad! I'm sure there are those who'd poopoo it, but for garage detail it's just fine.
    #48
  9. Frank06

    Frank06 Been here awhile

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    You don't want to baby things too much... did you hone the cylinders at all or scuff them up somehow? Generally you need to load rings a bit to get them to seat, half-throttle kind of stuff.
    #49
  10. Droptarotter

    Droptarotter Long timer

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    That's correct.......keep a load on the bike.....but do not lug it.
    It's not easy to get rings seated with the Nickasil liners if you baby it too much.

    Cheers
    #50
  11. SUVslayer

    SUVslayer Long timer

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    I'm keeping it mostly midrange, not giving it tons of gas but staying on it, if that's what you mean. My question is, how long until they seat and you can start running it normally?
    #51
  12. Mugwest

    Mugwest .

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    You're doing well on the learning curve, Slayer.

    Snowbum (he goes to Eleven, bless him :lol3) was right after all on the no-goop rule for airhead sump and valve cover gaskets: NONE, unless you have a confirmed warped-surface condition. It only took me nearly a decade to realize this. Sump and valve cover gaskets go on dry, and the torque is very light. It's over-torquing these (esp the sump gasket) that starts leaks. Lots of goop is a very bad idea, and you can count on seeing orange permatex in the pump pickup

    Exhaust nuts: i'm surprised nobody suggested slightly tightening them first, while warm. Often breaks the thread corrosion before you start removing threads on the dry removal cycle.

    I use the engine's recently-run heat to start a soak-in cycle of PB, Kroil, Liq Wrench etc. Let it cool, more penetrant. Use the expansion/contraction cooldown cycles to get the penetrator in the threads. Slight tighten to break the corrosion, then more penetrant, then try removal. No go? Propane and more chem applications. Never stuck an exhaust nut yet. This is also the drill for pulling stuck muffler components apart

    High-temp copper antiseize is the tits. I have a big tub of spendy Wurth stuff that's rated to 1000F or some such. It goes on liberally to any exhaust item i touch. Even standard parts-store antiseize will be a blessing next time you hafta take stuff apart :nod
    #52