Airhead "Tips and Tricks"

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by elmoreman, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. Recht

    Recht Binge Thinker

    Joined:
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    1,408
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    Panasonic LC-X1220P
    Digikey P-231-ND
    #41
  2. Lornce

    Lornce Lost In Place

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    Way Out There.

    No special fabrication unless you call two heavy black tie wraps crossed over the coil and holding it in place "fabrication". :wink:

    fwiw,
    Lornce
    #42
  3. andmoon

    andmoon Long timer

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    Thanks.

    I knew the white ones were not as strong!:D
    #43
    JimBentley likes this.
  4. Joerg

    Joerg Long timer

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    Sounds as if you're riding a Harley :lol3
    #44
  5. El Hombre

    El Hombre Banned

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    Ok, now I understand. That's an important detail, lets you put pretty much anything in there.
    #45
  6. andmoon

    andmoon Long timer

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    When I got my airhead I was impressed by how quiet the heads were.

    Noisey valves are happy valves....when the valves get quiet, it's a good idea to check the clearances.
    #46
  7. TEXASYETI

    TEXASYETI Call me "thread killer!"

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    Thank you sir! :thumb
    #47
  8. boxertwinuk

    boxertwinuk GB Rider

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    Engerland
    #48
  9. jdiaz

    jdiaz .

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    The spec sheet says it replaces the Panasonic, but it looks like you'll need to make some terminals.
    #49
  10. boxertwinuk

    boxertwinuk GB Rider

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    Thanks for that.
    #50
  11. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

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    For anyone needing to unbolt connecting rods, I found today, Autozone carries a nice set of four 12 points including the 10mm required for this job. Best part, the price of the set sold under the name "OEM Industrial" is $12.99! I just happened into this as Solo Lobo was already kind enough to loan me his more authentic version.

    -dubb
    #51
  12. datchew

    datchew Don't buy from Brad

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    I don't know how prevalent this is on airheads, but on my old beetle, it seems to happen about once every 2 years. And it just happened on my airhead and I had to wait about a week for the part.

    Oil pressure sending unit. The plastic will crack or something and instant oil leaks. Sometimes bad enough that you are losing too much oil to continue your journey.

    If you don't want to carry a spare one with you (which might get old and brittle by the time you need it, YMMV), go to the hardware store and buy a metric bolt. M12 x 1.5 is the type. Saw it off with a hacksaw to about 0.5" which is the depth of the oil pressure unit.

    IMPORTANT!!! Make sure you de-burr, file, touch-up the cut you made so that there aren't any burrs. The reason is because usually the bolt you buy at the hardware store is going to be steel which will cut and mar the threads on aluminum engine block. Make sure the bolt will go almost all the way in by hand with minimal resistance.

    And make sure you use the crush washer.


    Also, on that same note, my stock tool kit did not come with anything that would fit the 24mm oil pressure switch. Might want to add a deep 24mm socket to the tool kit cause you're pretty talented if you can get it with a crescent wrench. (I couldn't.)
    #52
  13. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

    Joined:
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    I've got a method I've been using with great results. Thought I'd share.

    [​IMG]

    Three steps:
    1. I clean the old part with any degreaser, really clean, and when dry, spray lightly with LPS electro contact cleaner to remove traces of solvent and other residue. The idea here is to have a uniformly clean surface to apply the next step.
    2. Wet the part with water (very important to avoid streaking). Then with great care (wearing rubber gloves, long sleeves, dust mask and eye protection) apply the phosphoric acid with a nylon paint brush. I brush it around over the whole part for about two or three minutes in a sink, rinse and repeat. Do not splash the rinse water or straight acid on your body---very harmful and toxic---. Rinse thoroughly again, air dry or use compressor. The part should now be very soft white in color. If it is blotchy, you probably didn't do a good job with step one.
    3. Now the fun part. This Flitz shit is amazing. Don't know what's in it. Some secret German formula. Apply with terry cloth just llike your mom's silver polish. An incredible amount of black oxidation will come off in the cloth. I did my carbs inside and out including the slides. After satisfied that you've got the worst of it, polish lightly with a clean bit of cloth and your done. It works wonders without a huge effort!

    Before and After:
    [​IMG]

    -dubb

    BTW, at datchew's request I made this thread a sticky. Need more material. I'm sure there a million more ideas out there. :D
    #53
  14. elmoreman

    elmoreman takin' a break, boss

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    my baby's all grown up into a sticky!

    Some great info on this thread so far, definately one for airhead noobs to digest.:clap
    #54
  15. elmoreman

    elmoreman takin' a break, boss

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    Some of you might have seen my photos in the last Airmail of a trip to Maine. In one of the photos I'm checking the integrity of my neutral indicator switch replacement. A few tips:
    • you do NOT need to remove the transmission
    • remove the thru bolt holding the spacer in place. This spacer prevents you from getting to the neutral indicator switch easily.
    • knock out the spacer with a drift, being sure to pad any areas that might get digned in the process.
    • file off leading edge of spacer so that it will return to its place more easily, then put it in the freezer for a while so that it might shrink a bit
    • Disconnect leads
    • replace the switch and washer (of course, be sure to drain the tranny oil first)
    • clean and then connect leads
    • gingerly knock the spacer back into place
    • clean thrubolt and add a light layer of grease
    • put it back in
    • ride off happy!
    Snowbum covers this more extensively, but this could get you started. I waited a while to do it because not much fluid was leaking and I was a bit scared by the process. Turned out to be pretty simple, actually-just a lot of patience getting the spacer back properly.
    #55
  16. uptown

    uptown No stoppies on an Airhead

    Joined:
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    ATL
    A super easy "duh I-should-have-thought-of-this-earlier" tip:

    If you have a leaky petcock and don't feel like rebuilding it right away, try turning it to the "other" off position - 180 degrees from your usual off position. It might just keep your boot dry until you can get her back into the workshop!

    :D
    #56
  17. uptown

    uptown No stoppies on an Airhead

    Joined:
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    Find out about the wealth of online resources for airhead information. Definitely not a complete list, just the ones I frequent the most. YMMV.

    Snowbum's website
    - put your HTML glasses on and deal with the non-existant navigation - it's worth it. Snowbum’s definitely a “take it apart and see how it works” type of mechanic.

    Duane Ausherman's website
    - the website is a little easier on the eyes, has some great tips and info. A former BMW dealer owner, and I would say a “if it ain't broken, don’t fix it” type of guy.

    Of course, the Airheads website ($20/yr dues) and the Airheads List has the highest concentration of experienced Airheads, IMO. For the life of me I can't follow all of the listproc email threads, so I just search the archives on Micapeak (registration required) instead.

    Boxerworks Forum. Not a super active forum, but exclusively for airhead owners. For me this forum seems like it’s a conversation between 10 guys that talk mostly amongst themselves, but are very willing to help out a n00b when they straggle in.

    Let me know if there are some others that I am missing! :ear
    #57
  18. Bazza

    Bazza Adventurer

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    Sep 18, 2004
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    North Texas
    I solder connectors to the spare brushes that I include in my traveling spares kit. With the connectors soldered on I don't have to worry about carrying a soldering iron to repair failed brushes.
    I also check the condition of the brushes every time I have the front cover off my righteous scooter. I carry the brushes for the unfortunate riders, those who don't carry spares, that might need spares brushes. I also include a rotor, diode spares and other items for the same reason. I love airheads!

    One cannot alway plan on equipment failures. Why are accidents called accidents.

    Bazza
    1978 R100S
    Plano, Texas
    #58
  19. Johann

    Johann commuterus tankslapperus

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
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    What I've picked up so far on GS paralevers....

    1)When changing throttle cables undo jubilee clips holding carbs in place and push bings around horizontal to the ground to gain easy access to remove/fit new cables.

    2)When removing/inspecting shaft budget on replacing paralever pivot bearings (only aboutb £10 a go).

    3) Start developing a near obsessive interest in the quantity and quality of the swarf collected on the magnet on the gearbox drain plug (swarf per se is normal, soild lumps in swarf=bad)

    4)Control cables seem to last about 40K. BMW cables are slightly more expensive than pattern cables bit at least you can guarantee they will be the correct length and be of good quality (don't ask!).
    #59
  20. homerj

    homerj 742 Evergreen Terrace

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    Lace replacement cables along side the current cables and zip tie them together. Cover the ends with duct tape. If a cable snaps mid ride you just have to swap the ends and you're back on the road.
    #60