Airhead "Tips and Tricks"

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by elmoreman, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. JohnLocke

    JohnLocke Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 4, 2011
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    199
    Does anyone know which year's/models seats are interchangeable with my 1974 R90?
  2. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Some of the /5 seats fit. What's called the LWB /5, that stands for Long Wheel Base. Not all /5 seats fit. They also have SWB, that stands for Short Wheel Base. The LWB /5 fits.

    All the /6 seats fit except S bike, the R90S.

    The /7 seat will fit if also done with the tank. The /7 tank is longer so if done with out the tank there will be a large gap between seat and tank. I guess you could say the /7 does fit but looks funny.
  3. JohnLocke

    JohnLocke Been here awhile

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    199
    Thanks. good info.
  4. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    Not sure if this has already been mentioned on an earlier page but here goes; When fitting clutch and or throttle/choke cables I always tie a piece of string to one end of the cable prior to removing the old cable. I reattach the string to the new cable prior to replacement. That way the string is the lead and I am never in any doubt as to the original routing of the cable as I thread it back through. Saves much time and head scratching.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
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  5. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    I've heard of people having great difficulty refitting these so here is my quick & easy fitting tip; I use 2 zippy ties (one will likely break) and I make two loops in parallel ( a single insulated wire loop would probably work as well) which I attach through the eye of the spring not attached to the frame. I tie the other end of the two loops together with a length of twine/rope that is strong enough to overcome the spring tension (but will obviously not break the twine). The plastic ties grip the spring end when things start getting cramped whereas a steel wire loop is likely to slip off and sit you on your backside. This setup will allow you to pull the spring in a linear direction (which is how these springs work) far enough to attach them the the side stand fixing lug. Forget using side cutters at 90 degrees, or brake spring tools as you will be able to fit these springs in less than 10 seconds (once all is lined up) using
    this method. Good luck

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
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  6. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Another tip from my tuning techniques is that when holding RPM at 3000ish RPM to set max advance timing it helps to have a second person to hold the throttle. You will usually find that the person continually fluctuates the RPM up and down trying to keep it steady. Easy fix is to have them to get the RPM close to the target setting and then hold the collar on the throttle grip still like a throttle lock with a thumb grip from their other hand. (i.e. two hands) Easier to fine tune and hold RPM steady that way.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
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  7. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    During some repairs I prefer to remove the battery earth connection from the gearbox and then let the terminal hang loose. To avoid the risk of unintended earth contact and risk shorting the diode board I attach a length of garden hose over the terminal to keep it insulated & out of harms way.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
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  8. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    Oddometer:
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    Several years ago I was keen to try and improve the gear shifting feel on my airheads and after checking different oil grades and talking with an oil analyst I decided to try some LS90 weight oil ("LS" as in Limited Slip diff oil) I was very impressed by the improved smoothness and feel of the box. LS oil is not recommend in gearboxes where phosphor bronze parts (i.e.synchro rings) are used, but as our airheads have no p b bits I decided to test the theory.

    After some distance and feeling very happy with the result I had a chat with a respected BM repairer only to be told he had come to the same conclusion himself. "Been doing the it for years" he said. It is now in my drive shaft and final drive as well. Great stuff and good results.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
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  9. RecycledRS

    RecycledRS Along for the ride

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    I also tried limited slip and thought the improved shifting was just me imagining it. Good to find out someone else has had a similar result.
  10. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Limited Slip is an additive for the friction plates of the wet clutch in bikes with wet clutches and Limited Slip rear ends in cars. No idea why this should work in Airhead transmissions. I guess I'm just used to way mine shifts.
  11. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    Oddometer:
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    Hi diston. The LS90 oil is still 90 weight but yes the additive is for the LS clutch plates etc.. Definately a smoother change end result.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community.) :wink:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/anzairheads/
  12. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    Oddometer:
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    I've seen some strange and expensive contraptions for brake bleeding on bikes & cars, but I've had good success by using a cheap 60ml hospital style syringe with a length of clear pvc tubing fitted to the syringe body and the other end obviously connected to the brake bleeder nipple.

    The syringe will give plenty of suction, and for the small volumes that we are dealing with on our bikes the capacity is plenty good enough. i.e. fit hose, crack nipple, pull syringe handle, draw fluid, bleed, keep an eye on the reservoir level, close nipple & you're done. This tool makes bleeding an easy one man job. The syringe also comes in handy for when the reservoir is a little over filled. After use just cycle some water through it to help preserve the plunger rubber from brake fluid contamination.

    One more tip on this device; Make sure to drill a small hole in the side of the syringe body close to the top, near the limit its extension (i.e. the 55ml point) and then fit a largish blunted PK screw into the syringe body so that the plunger can not be completely pulled out of the body by accident during bleeding. Last thing you need is brake fluid all over your paintwork. Cheers guys.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community.) :wink:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/anzairheads/

    [​IMG]
  13. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better

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    You can also get those syringes with what's called a catheter tip. Also referred to as feeding syringes. The catheter tip is even easier to stick a hose onto.
  14. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    It's easier using a syringe to fill from the bottom. Fill your syringe with brake fluid. Make sure the res. is empty and plunge from bottom to fill the res. way quicker. Feed stores or tack/ferrier shops are best place to find that big syringe.
  15. boxerboy81

    boxerboy81 Stay Horizontal

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    The one above is called a luer lock. I has some advantages too. If the tubing used is also luer lock, then there's no chance it'll disconnect under pressure from the plunger..

    [​IMG]
    The syringe can also come as a "catheter" tip where the tubing is a push fit on a tapered tip. It's more secure than a push fit on a luer lock tip, but not as secure as a correct luer lock connection.
  16. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    I could see how it would help. I think the difference is most likely simply from the oil being thicker. I think dino 80/90 shifts a lot better than a lot of synthetics simply because it is thicker and here 90 wt is thicker than 80/90wt. I use BMW 80/90. It's Spectro oil only a lot cheaper because it says BMW on the bottle.
  17. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

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    Oddometer:
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    Thanks hardwaregrrl.... Interesting. I'll give it a try next time to compare and will post my thoughts. If there's an easier way I'm all ears. Cheers.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/anzairheads/
  18. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked

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    Sep 29, 2010
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    7,990
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    I made a single wider strap using two pieces of welding rod an a strip of rubber cut out of an old inner tube. I wrapped the rubber strip over the rods and overlapped in the middle and glued it with tire patch glue. Same length as stock, but wide enough to fit between the two stock locations. Overkill, I know, but it works and is rebuildable.
  19. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Australia
    Any reason you're not replacing them with the O.E. type?.. They are still available. Not cheap but they work and look like they belong.

    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/anzairheads/
  20. patanga

    patanga BMWAirheadsDownunder

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    161
    Location:
    Australia
    How many times have you cursed the fitment of the T/C link on the single row boxer chains. Even with average sized hands it can be a P.I.T.A. Here is a tool that I made for nix that will give you a remote controlled micro hand, perfect for getting into the tight space behind the chain. Just recycle your old tensioner spring, straighten out a few windings, leaving the end two loops in place, bend to shape and you're away. The perfect tool for the job.

    Oh and regards holding the chain ends together while lining up the link, (so that you still have two hands free to work); just use a single zippy tie between the link drum ends to keep the two ends held together. (NOT multiple zippy ties around the entire circumference of the chain as I've also seen done :confused).... Snip the zippy tie holding the chain ends together when the link is in place and yer done:) ........ Good luck.........

    You can see this tool in action over at a post I made recently. Scroll down about 3/4 of the page on this link; http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=792675&page=2

    [​IMG]


    ____________________
    "The only reason people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory" (Joe Garcia)

    Check us out on facebook at "BMW Airheads Downunder", (The Australia and New Zealand Airhead Community). "B.A.D" :wink:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/anzairheads/