Airhead "Tips and Tricks"

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by elmoreman, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    BMW has a special tool that works something along those lines. I have never used one for the regular type working fine or using a pneumatic type. If you keep the regular type, whether they are mechanical or pneumatic, out of the head while compressing the springs, they put NO stress on the head.
  2. garthg

    garthg Been here awhile

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  3. garthg

    garthg Been here awhile

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  4. garthg

    garthg Been here awhile

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  5. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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  6. garthg

    garthg Been here awhile

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    Plaka:

    Never had a problem on ebay. Just got a Snap On hex socket, like new, for half of list, shipped in 2 days from a guy in Colorado. Bought from him before.

    If one were to go out an buy the threaded rod, steel, etc. to make your device, it would be more than the $19 for which several compressors are available on ebay.

    Having the right tool also makes the job easier and faster.
  7. Les_Garten

    Les_Garten Been here awhile

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    I have one of those Cheap azz compressors on Fleaby. Works, but not well. There's something they missed when they copied the classic compressor. I'm always afraid I'm going to lose a finger!

    I'd like to have a pneumatic one, but I'd probably tear up a head with it :eek1

    The MAC one for $98 I'm sure is fine.
  8. garthg

    garthg Been here awhile

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    This is the factory tool (I don't think I've ever seen one):

    https://www.bmwmc.net/catalog/222.pdf

    It's two pieces with a wooden stand to hold the head, and a lever arm to compress the spring and retainer.

    [​IMG]
  9. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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  10. Kai Ju

    Kai Ju Long timer

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    I was taught to make the washer level with the base gasket surface.
    Yes, I realize that the washer is at an angle to said surface. Use the part closest to the barrel as a reference.
    Lay a straight edge across the base gasket surface and it should just touch the washer/ring that compresses the tube seal.
    Bear in mind that this needs to be adjusted if you use one of the compression reducing base gaskets.
  11. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    What keeps the threaded rod from turning? I don't think pushing on the sealing surface is a good idea. I also don't like the idea of marring the gasket surface with those washers. I like to look at the tube nearing the head gasket surface for depth.

    The valve spring compressor leaves very little room to gt the keepers out and especially back in. Remember that when it is being used a pry bar is right in your way. I would be careful clamping down the head to a bench with the head all cockeyed for the threaded bolt's nut's and washers on the gasket surface. Better make sure your bench is smooth and clean. I don't know, It seems like a good way to muff something up to me. I'll stick with my conventional clamp. You do have to be careful with those too!
  12. RagerToo

    RagerToo vroom vroom

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    A good grunt is an experienced, professional guess.
  13. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    Experienced professionals use torque wrenches.
  14. BeenThere

    BeenThere Been here awhile

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    There is an old video of British bikes being assembled in the factory, Triumph I think, and there was not a single torque wrench being used. I would think that anyone tightening the same bolts and nuts several times a day would get a good feel for how tight is correct though.

    Norm
  15. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    When our car assembly industry fell over, a lot of equipment ended up in used machinery shops - lots of fixed size and fixed value torque wrenches...eg, a 12mm at 35mn.

    In case you have missed all the Margaret Thatcher threads, the difference between British and Japanese factories was unions.
  16. daveoneshot

    daveoneshot Been here awhile

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    This is becoming interesting reading. Anybody remember those pictures of Japanese factory workers doing calisthenics and Tai Chi movements before going to work in their factories ??
  17. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

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    And compare that to the British workers having a greasy fry up breakfast before going to work ?
  18. chasbmw

    chasbmw Long timer

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    The Japanese had the big advantage of starting from ground zero, both in terms of equipment and management.
  19. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    I would differ on that. Things were in shambles after the war but the attitude was definitely high production mode. Everyone was in that mindset.

    I remember when made in japan meant you were getting crap, much like made in China means today. But the Japenese knew it and didn't like it. They set their sights on being an industrial power with first class manufacturing...and they did it. No one turns up their nose at made in Japan today. They had the engineering, during the war their aircraft were the best in the world. And Mitsubishi never slowed down. Canon, Olympus and Nikon were giving Leitz, Zeiss and Wild a run for their money in industrial and consumer optics. Mitutoyo is easily the equal of Anthol Starret in measuring equipment (and cheaper) and then there is their whole electronics industry. What did the US make compared to what Matsushita was turning out?
    But what I really note, from modern times, is what happened when Toyota completely blew it. Took awhile but the chairman was on national TV taking personal responsibility (and expressing person shame) over the incident. US executives don't think that way...at all.
  20. Kt-88

    Kt-88 I like everything.

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    That's not entirely correct. Japanese industry postwar was very limited in the resource allocation allowances and were further challenged by being essentially overseen by American authorities.

    Thankfully the collusion of cultures and ideas led to amazing advances in industrial management. Namely the Japanese industry became , over a few decades, the leading force in lean conceptualization. Using the PDCA technique of Arthur Deming and the kaizen/yoketan principles of daily improvement, corrolary with Shingo's SMED and poke-yoke concepts, the Japanese industry exploded in quality amazingly rapidly in almost every category. This is why early Japanese products were little more than cheap, unreliable knock offs, and then fifteen years later all of a sudden there's the CB750.