almost new rider

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by KillerDyller, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. KillerDyller

    KillerDyller Adventurer

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    Hey guys. Just wanted to give a thanks for all the good info available on this forum. I take the MSF course next month and am anxious as hell about it. Five years ago I made the mistake of buying a used Honda shadow 750 and assuming I'd be able to figure out how to ride by myself. That worked for about two weeks until I put her in a ditch. No helmet, no gloves, no nothing. Luckily I was fine, but lesson learned, and I sold the bike shortly thereafter. I've had the urge to get back into riding the last two years, but want to do it the proper way this time. Hope to be on a used XT250 or sherpa in the month or so. I've budgeted some cash for gear already also. Totally pumped to get back into it. Thanks for all the info. :freaky
    #1
  2. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    It's never too late to learn the right things. Welcome! :clap


    Can you imagine how many new riders didn't have the same 2nd chance?
    #2
  3. mhpr262

    mhpr262 Banned

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    Especially the ones who bought a Hayabusa or a GSXR 1000 ...

    #3
  4. PT Rider

    PT Rider Been here awhile

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    Dyller, welcome aboard.

    A couple of books that will be a help to your riding:
    Mastering the Ride: More Proficient Motorcycling, 2nd ed. (2012), David L. Hough's latest.

    Twist of the Wrist -- 2, Keith Code. (Maybe Twist of the Wrist -- II) Note that this #2 book has Code's excellent "Survival Reaction" movements that are natural, instinctive, and wrong. The original Twist of the Wrist is more about track riding and not as well suited to the beginner. I think the TOTW-II video is good, but I like the book better.

    There are more books that are excellent as you build more miles in the saddle, and there is additional training that is highly recommended, but also after you get more miles.
    #4
  5. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    Yep, especially but not exclusively
    #5
  6. Vanquish

    Vanquish Adventurer

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    The XT 250 is a great steed to learn on, relatively light with reasonable power without being intimidating. Take your time, take it easy and get the feel of motorcycling . It is extremely rewarding if learnt and done properly. Toptip: Ride with your head and not the ego once you have mastered the elementary stuff. All the best :-)
    #6
  7. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Team Orange

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    Buy the first book, Proficient Motorcycling too. Both books are very good for helping you be a safe rider.

    I'm not as impressed with A Twist Of The Wrist 2 for teaching a new rider. The first book is aimed at the race track and the second one claims to be street oriented, but is also aimed at the race track - in my opinion. Something like Total control by Lee Parks is better for the real world.

    But both Hough books have been the most valuable of the 8 or so riding books that I've read so far.
    #7
  8. Reverend12

    Reverend12 Well there it is..

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    Congratulations on doing it right this time. Enjoy the MSF Course pay attention and practice, practice!
    #8
  9. ChaoSS402

    ChaoSS402 Adventurer

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    Get the gear before you go to MSF. Depending on what kind of jacket you buy and the weather, you may not want to be wearing it for the class, but boots might not be a bad idea, sometimes ankle injuries can be bad even at slow speeds. Also, you don't want to be wearing one of their helmets, that's just disgusting. Bring your own.
    #9
  10. hippiebrian

    hippiebrian Long timer

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    The safety course is the single best thing you can do as a new rider. Enjoy! After the course, it's practice. Ride whenever you can, and find an empty lot or something to practice looking through curves, emergency braking, maybe some figure 8's and whatever. The more you ride, the better and safer you'll be.

    Most importantly, have fun!
    #10
  11. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen

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    David Hough's "Proficient Motorcycling" IS one of the best books to get, especially for a newer rider. David contributed a lot to the MSF format for many years.

    Another book to consider is "Motorcycling Excellance" published as a MSF book for riders. It may be good also because the book format is very similar to the MSF student handbook, but with a lot more detail and explanation.
    #11
  12. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Team Orange

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    I had been riding for more than 20 years and more than 50,000 miles when I first read his book, and I still think that it has made the biggest difference in helping me to be a safe rider.

    All riders should read that book.
    #12
  13. KillerDyller

    KillerDyller Adventurer

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    Have both proficient motorcycling on order from amazon. Keeping my eye on craigslist for a used XT250 and biding my time until the course.
    #13
  14. davidbeinct

    davidbeinct Been here awhile

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    I had a Sherpa for a first bike. It was a great learning tool, and pretty capable in easier single track. The XT 250 looks very similar, with the bonus that it's still available in the states. Good luck and congrats on doing it right this time.

    Sent from another older learner.

    David B.
    #14
  15. KillerDyller

    KillerDyller Adventurer

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    Thanks Dave. Nice fish.

    Hard to restrain myself from going out and picking a bike up now. I told myself I'd wait until after the MSF, but man is it tempting.
    #15
  16. cb200t

    cb200t Been here awhile

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    I am with you on the waiting. I am restoring my first moto. The first and only time I rode was 3 years ago at the msf course that I took just to say I had ridden a bike. After my little CB200T is restored, I plan on tsking the msf course again before getting on the roads. I don't have any gear, but plan to buy attg before I start riding.

    Sent from my LG-LS840 using Tapatalk 2
    #16
  17. KillerDyller

    KillerDyller Adventurer

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    Knocked out the first day of rising at the BRC today. Lot of fun!!! Did fairly well, u turns in the box suck!
    #17
  18. KillerDyller

    KillerDyller Adventurer

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    Riding not raising. Damn auto correct.
    #18
  19. C/1/509

    C/1/509 Why?

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    Yup - I just read a blurb in Bike that said that you have to practice something new 2500 times before it starts to get grooved and feel comfortable - 2500 times!
    #19