Alternative to Nav VI?

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by jollydropdraws, Jun 21, 2017.

  1. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    the entire USA is 4.3 GB, give or take. if that's not enough, you might have to buy a 16 GB SD card for $7 while you're there getting the k phone.

    still under the $50 budget before taxes

    hey, if you don't think it's tough enough, buy ten of them, you're stool under the price of the Garmin, and you'll have nine redundancies.
    #41
  2. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    it's raining, what can I say....


    OK I wanted to make sure I didn't lie about buying ten of the Kyocera phones and still be under budget so I checked on Amazon.... yup the nav VI is listed as $949
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/cr/B071D6N39S/ref=mw_dp_cr
    here's the only review from that listing:
    Screenshot_2017-07-26-14-40-25.png

    so yes, you could buy ten, or twenty of the cheapo Kyocera's, have full Bluetooth capabilities, GPS, music, turn by turn, without issues, and still be ready under budget.
    #42
  3. PittsDriver

    PittsDriver Been here awhile

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    Point taken. All in good fun :)
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  4. PittsDriver

    PittsDriver Been here awhile

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    OK, I asked for it and you provided - thank you. I've learned something new. I might bite on this to try it out and I'm finding these unlocked phones on Amazon in the $60 range with a rugged case. I'm not an Android guy so do you have any suggestions on what app and map source I should use for maps (topo, road) and will support importing tracks? I guess I'll go off looking for Android threads on here.
    #44
  5. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    you're welcome !

    I feel your pain about changing platforms... I've used iOS for a grand total of about five minutes, it would be very difficult to get my head around iOS , windows phone (thankfully dead), blacberry, sailfish, or one of the other mobile operating systems. this is the most jarring part of the process.

    as far as applications, it depends on the environment you like to ride in and your preferences.

    iron butt= Google maps, Waze, similar online apps that are always updated instantly.

    dualsport= oruxmaps, back country navigator, maverick, locus, Osmand, and similar apps on the android market

    hard off road= locus, bcn, osmand , orux

    just getting your head around the mobile operating system is a good start, then picking an app or three to explore with, and using them for a Saturday morning street ride will bring you a lot of questions to ask.

    remember, it's a steep learning curve in the beginning, but it gets easier each time out
    #45
  6. taz_va

    taz_va Long timer

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    Yeah, I never doubted the device existed at the price point. There's been a few sub-$100 ip57/67 devices I've had my eye on for other reasons, I may actually grab one of these instead. I'm prototyping something which needs about 5" of waterproof android usability, so this device would be great.

    As for my personal tastes, I'll stick with my android tablets.
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  7. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Might want to learn how to ride so you aren't submerging your bike and GPS. Just sayin...................
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  8. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    And inadequate riders.
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  9. PittsDriver

    PittsDriver Been here awhile

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    Yeah, I'll keep working on that. Very helpful, thanks for the advice.

    Are all the protection parts on your bike because you don't know how to ride it? Or maybe you ride it so well in gnarly terrain that you don't need any protection parts?

    We ride were there are sometimes deep water crossings and we don't shy away from them. We don't have many drops but a ruined nav device could be a trip ending drop on rides we do and it's worth it to us to make sure things can survive the abuse we throw at them.

    Mississippi flood mud during a named storm when we were on the TAT:

    #49
  10. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    I've broken a hell of a lot more stand alone GPS's than I have phones. Went through three 478's before giving up on those POS's. Sure, they could charge while being under water, but they beat themselves apart on the bars of a dual sport bike so I never got to verify how well the held up under water since they couldn't hold up above water. You're kidding yourself if you think a stand alone GPS is any more durable than a ruggedized phone.

    Oh, and breaking any of them never have nor ever will be a trip ending event for me.
    #50
  11. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    yup, that silty stuff always eats my chains, wears out brake pads, and destroys wheel bearings. it's really annoying to start our with a fresh bike and end up with worn stuff after a weekend. :-(

    I pretty much hate mud now. the rednecks are drawn to it in sxs, 4x4 , and stolen cars. they destroy the roads, leave trash everywhere, and sometimes leave the burning cars in the woods. I bet if mud were never invented, they would just stay home and watch NASCAR.
    #51
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  12. PittsDriver

    PittsDriver Been here awhile

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    Is that a comment about the limited kind of trips you take or that you carry spares for all the POS GPSs you're breaking?

    There's all kinds of riders out there doing all kinds of rides so this whole discussion, and your view of it, is going to depend on the kind of riding you do. If you're following a GPS track 3,000 miles from home and 4,000 miles from the end of my ride in a place where replacements aren't possible you just have to decide what it is that you want with you for guidance so that you can stay on your tracks. For me, I carry two BMW Navs (a V and now a VI) and another guy in our group of four has a Nav IV - all loaded with our tracks and waypoints. We've yet to eat a GPS on our many adv rides and it's working for us. We're taking weeks off from work and family to go do these rides and cheaping out on anything that could crimp the ride makes no sense. If you're just wandering around in the woods this weekend, anything works for that.

    So my apologies if my perspective was out of whack with what people were looking for when they started asking about alternatives to the BMW Nav units.
    #52
  13. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    you're right to be carrying redundancies. I carry an extra phone in my pack, it's synced with the same waypoint/track databases as my main unit. haven't needed it in the last six years of off road riding.

    cheap.... I think "just costs less" is being confused with a quality metric.

    wandering around in the woods... vs planning a trip that requires everyone's schedules to coincide, logistics, more money, and higher costs for poor planning.... but it doesn't change the ability of the hardware at all. its still just a screen you follow. the drama about planning, choosing the "Right tires", the right gloves, the right tent, etc is all played here on adv over and over again.... but the navigation is way less of an issue. it works in the woods, it works on the road, and when you break it, have a backup. cheap? no... smart, yes
    #53
  14. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Nope, it's a comment about how I wouldn't let something so minor as a nav device breaking interfere with a trip. Nice obfuscation though. But since you mention it, I always have a spare device since my Galaxy S5 is strictly a stand alone GPS and I can use my main phone if I ever actually needed a backup. So far, I've only managed to destroy one of those, and that's because it popped out of the mount and hit the pavement at 90 MPH.
    #54
  15. nrp

    nrp Been here awhile

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    Late reply, but here it goes. I have the Nav III on my 12 GS - and use it only as a backup if everything else fails. Most of the time Nav III is off.

    My main navigation device is my Android phone. Most Samsungs are weather proof - I had it in heavy rain for hours without any issues - so it is very adequate. And with the X-Grip and tether the mount is very solid. The tether makes a lot of difference btw.

    Anyways, back to navigation. When in need of regular navigation I use Waze - and it is quite good with the hazard and police reports and speed limits that are very precise. Google maps is also quite good. You can choose your poison here.

    However, I enjoy my predefined routes a lot. And when I'm in the mood for a predefined route I use the Tomtom Go Android app. I design my routes using the TomTom web site and they sync with my phone over the air, automatically. No need for downloads, cables, etc. It is all automatic and synced with your TomTom account. And the maps are stored locally, so there is not even a need to use data. The best part is that you can still keep Waze in the background, configured to only alert you in case of hazards or police force in your way. It is perfect.

    In the past I would use Nav III for predefined routes, with BaseCamp to design them, connect the GPS with a cable to the computer, download the routes etc. Since finding the Tomtom app the Nav III became a backup. Tomtom is way more convenient with the over the air sync.

    I hope it helps.
    #55