Anchoring a hammock to your bike

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by 404 Travels, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. 404 Travels

    404 Travels n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4
    For my North-South America trip, I plan to mainly use my hammock (Hennesy). The main issue I foresee is finding two tree's or poles spaces nicely apart in a location that is suitable.

    So, I am determined to use my bike as one of the anchor points, making it so I only need one tree/pole anywhere I go (much easier to find :wink:)

    I know this guy did it (kinda), by running the tie line over the handle bars to second point (cheating) that can be pretty much be at any height.

    I have searched high and low to find something that would allow me to simply use a single pole, the bike and a support for the bike, but haven't found a thing! Suggestions???

    I am riding a 2008 650cc Versys

    Cheers
    404
    #1
  2. 404 Travels

    404 Travels n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4
    Also, I know of this one, but it requires some serious ground anchors and what seems to be a lot of webbing & really complicated!

    Anything simpler?
    #2
  3. nuttynu

    nuttynu Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,010
    Location:
    Alaska
    Why not just tent ? To much of a hassle setting up ??
    #3
  4. 404 Travels

    404 Travels n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4
    I'll be bringing a tent too, it was simply to be able to use the hammock more. Because hammocks are awesome :D

    --404
    #4
  5. babarnette

    babarnette Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    905
    Location:
    Brandon, MS (On The Rez)
    Sounds like a bad idea to me, but I'm not a big hammock fan.
    #5
  6. DADODIRT

    DADODIRT Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,657
    Location:
    Durango,CO(not quite Purgatory)
    Take some pics for Face Plant.:D
    #6
  7. Wlfman

    Wlfman Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,295
    Location:
    TN/AL
    Sounds like one of those "Hold my beer, watch this..." moments.

    Don't think I would want to take the chance of several hundred pounds falling on me in the night nor the damage to the bike itself...
    #7
  8. NCK

    NCK Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    480
    Location:
    Taxation Without Representation (DC)
    the hell with the negative nancys! let's figure this out!
    #8
  9. MatatuPuncher

    MatatuPuncher Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    41
    Location:
    Vienna, VA
    You should be able to find two anchoring points most of the time. For those times that you can't, just go cowboy style with one end of the hammock attached to the bike. If you rig it up right, the portion where your head is should provide enough room. Down sides are you will still need a sleeping pad and you could have condensation issues.

    Have a good trip!
    #9
  10. Solarbronco

    Solarbronco Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    607
    Location:
    Boise, Idaho
    I do alot of backpacking. Even out west, I have almost no trouble finding two trees to secure my rig. A good tip, get a mat for your back or you will freeze all night. I have a lightweight thermarest that rolls up like a loaf of bread.

    Alot of great info can be found on Backpacking sites.
    #10
  11. 250senuf

    250senuf Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,464
    Location:
    Nelson area, Kootenai, BC, Canada
    How about tying one rope to the rear of the bike running it forward "draped" over the bar to the hammock? The pic you linked to has the rope coming from the side of the bike. What I'm suggesting is using the weight of the bike against itself. The rope is trying to lift up the rear but since the rope is going forward, not up, there is not much "up" force. The rope is also pushing down on the front due to the hammock. Maybe, maybe not??

    Do you have a centre stand or just the sidestand?
    #11
  12. Yankee Dog

    Yankee Dog Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,027
    Location:
    Decatur, AL
    Ok, this is what i would do. Be advised I have not tried this. I usually just sleep on the ground. But this is how you construct an anchor point to extricate a stuck vehicle when there is no ready anchor point.

    You will need 2 stakes, 3 if the ground is soft.

    Do not tie the hammock to the bike. Pass the rope over the bike at the lowest point of the seat and perpendicular to the bike. This is for stability.

    Drive the 1st stake into the ground at an angle away from the bike. Tie the rope to the bottom of stake one.

    Tie a short rope to the top of the 1st stake. Drive in a 2nd stake a short distance from the 1st. Tie the short rope to the bottom of the 2nd stake.

    The hammoc, the ropes and stakes should all form a straight line.
    #12
  13. Austinius

    Austinius n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5
    Location:
    Traveling the World on Honeymoon
    +1 on this Idea. And you should test it. Using the long wheelbase of the bike should be much more stable than one side or the other. Might need to leave it in gear so you dont roll it forward on you. Go forth and test! Put up a pic if you can get it to work!
    #13
  14. RVDan

    RVDan Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,745
    Location:
    Abbotsford British Columbia Canada
    I think you need a pole slightly taller than the bike. Stand it beside the bike. Tie your hammock to the top of it, and then tie it to the bike in a way that your weight in the hammock is trying to lift the bike rather than pull it over. Of course the pole would have to be fairly strong, and you'll have to anchor it to keep it from falling side to side, but it might work
    #14
  15. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,919
    Location:
    Okie near Muskogee
    On the other hand an ultralite cot will be far more versatile and still keep you suspended above the ground.
    #15
  16. opjocephus

    opjocephus Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    645
    Location:
    Central Indiana
  17. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    9,842
    Location:
    Western Sierras
    That looks like a lot of steel to carry, but seems to work.

    I like the idea of tying off to the rear axle, and running the rope over the bars. I would want something else anchoring the bike, though, to keep it from rolling forward. From the rear axle to a strong tree root or something...maybe just a rock in front of the front tire would do it, only experimentation will tell.

    You might also try tying the rope to the front half of the front wheel, then over the bars and off the front. Pulling on the rope would do 2 things: 1. rotate the wheel backwards, and 2. push down on the front suspension. Given enough traction, it might be stable.
    #17
  18. therdriele

    therdriele n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1
    I travel using Hennessy hammocks alot and I have spent a ton of time in them over the last 8 years. Hate to burst your bubble but this plan wont work.
    Our bros in Iraq hang Hennessy's off HumVees, etc, but a bike is neither high enough nor heavy enough to support a hammock with a person in it.

    When you only have one (or no) solid anchor point the best thing to do with a Hennessy is to hang the hammock low like a bivvy tent, so your weight is on the ground but you're still sheltered and have protection from bugs. Set up this way, it is still a good shelter and it doesnt need much for support.

    Hang one end higher off the tree (sign, etc, or a motorcycle), and use a short tent pole (walking stick, another motorcycle, folding chair, etc) to support the other end. This works and will still keep you pretty dry and protected from bugs. Put the side stakes far out and you'll have a good shelter.

    Or .. .just use the tent.

    Just a suggestion, but I've traveled with the Hennessys using a larger tarp (12x12 or 16x16 Kelty Noah's tarp) substituted for the Hennessy rain fly. This will give you some nice options. .. including shelter for bike, luggage, cooking space and a chair, all under the tarp with your hammock. Doesnt work as well in a blowing downpour, but in most other conditions it's fine.

    BTW the hammocks are terrible in cold weather, if you didnt already know that. You'll freeze to death below 40 degrees.
    #18
  19. babarnette

    babarnette Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    905
    Location:
    Brandon, MS (On The Rez)
    I just travel with Hennessy. Enough of that and you just don't care what you sleep on!:lol3
    #19
  20. Ed_in_miami

    Ed_in_miami Cubicle Traveler

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,289
    Location:
    25.805049 N, 80.304523 W
    I'd say you find two trees and hang the hamock between them. Plenty of trees in Latam...
    #20