Another advice on Alps please.

Discussion in 'EMEA' started by 2WheelieADV, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. 2WheelieADV

    2WheelieADV Been here awhile

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    Oh, I love good Paella...:) Thanks lot. will try it out up there. .

    "As for OP, Mate, we just went from Sarajevo-Zabljak-Kotor over the past 2 days and it was phenomenal riding, don't miss it if you get a chance. Especially coming down into Kotor."

    This is what we planning on doing too. From Sarajevo to take rt 18 to MN then E762 thru Niksic to Kotor. Let me know which way you think is better.
    Thanks mate.
    #21
  2. jetjackson

    jetjackson Been here awhile

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    Yeah we took the 762, also the border patrol coming across there were great, didn't make us pay for green card insurance, even when I mentioned it to him he just said, you can give me your money if you want but it's fine without.

    I got a map for Bosnia and for Montenegro with the opensource maps and put them on my Garmin, better than the Garmin Eastern Europe maps, which had nothing, but still not 100% accurate.

    Be careful on your way from Sarajevo to the border on that route as it becomes 1shared lane and the locals fly around the corners, not too bad but a touch hairy at points. As you get close to the border the great views start and only get better. You will cross some nice bridges and a huge dam.

    Once you get to Niksic, go East on what is listed as the M6 then you want to head south again once you get to the R11. like this here

    We did this though HERE

    The bit to come off the 762 and head up was INSANE... all these dark tunnels that you looked into and they were pitch back, it was like riding into nothing, never sure what was on the other side - it was cool! About to post a picture on my facebook page.

    http://www.facebook.com/thegreatgallivant - I am posting photos there on facebook, only one of up near Zabjlak though.

    Be careful with speed in Bosnia, a guy I met got knicked twice there. Speed limits are not always easy to come by either, not many signs so sometimes it is guestimation. Moreso with the lack of signs in Montenegro - at least a lot less than you will see in Western Europe. Meh, either way you are going to have a blast! We met heaps of cool riders on the road in Montenegro too. Watch the look on their faces when you tell them you are from the states :)
    #22
  3. 2WheelieADV

    2WheelieADV Been here awhile

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    So would you suggest on taking a detour thru Zabijak or going straight on 762 to Niksic? How much more time will it take?
    Thanks again.
    #23
  4. jetjackson

    jetjackson Been here awhile

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    I think it would take you about an extra 2-3 hours given all the stops etc that you end up doing to take photos. It is great, don't get met wrong, but then it may not be as appealing to you given that you are going to have already done so much of the alps in Italy/France. That's why I didn't recommend it straight away... but if you have the time, it is great, you get right up to the top of the mountains and it really opens up, everything is very old up there, kind of stuck in time in a way, all old cars and those giant hay bales, ah, best way is to just show you that part of the trip, here are some pics.

    [​IMG]
    On the way up where it flattens out.

    [​IMG]
    Old houses and cars with the strange style hay bales everywhere.

    [​IMG]
    Just over the top of the pass onto the other side, our temporary companion Gian-Carlo behind us.

    [​IMG]
    The way back down.

    [​IMG]
    Cows on the road into Zabljak

    [​IMG]
    Basketball on the same road... not many cars come through here then.


    [​IMG]
    This one is looking down toward Kotor, not on the Zabljak detour but just wanted to show you.
    #24
  5. 2WheelieADV

    2WheelieADV Been here awhile

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    Wow, stunning. And from the experience - photos don't make justice...
    #25
  6. Vixen

    Vixen Been here awhile

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    Southern Switzerland - 4 major passes all within short distance of eachother, including Furka and Nufenen. Stelvio is doable from there. Not to be missed, if you're travelling in that direction.

    We started in Milan last year, headed straight to these passes enroute to Fussen. Absolutely amazing ride.
    #26
  7. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    You weren't trying hard enough :wink:

    The following passes: Furka, Oberalp, St. Gotthard, Neufenen, Grimsel, Susten, Klausen, Praegel, Acherli, Glaubenbuelen, Glaubenberg, Brunig & Lukmanier are all within a 50km radius of Andermatt.

    While trying to hit them all in one day would be a stretch, doing them all in 2 days isn't a major challenge. :eek1

    And 3 days gives you enough time for lunch stops with naps. :D
    #27
  8. Ali in Austria

    Ali in Austria Been here awhile

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    Just watch out for the Swiss mobile speed traps. Fines (on the spot) are mind boggling and the checks are getting more frequent.

    Last year they were stopping bikes on mass and doing tyre checks. €500 for a defective tyre.
    #28
  9. 2WheelieADV

    2WheelieADV Been here awhile

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    I guess we have to go slower especially on rented bikes.
    In regards to Balkans, what currency do they have? Do they accept euro or dollars, or we'll have to exchange for local money?
    Also, is it ok to have just the US (NJ) driving license (no international one)?
    #29
  10. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    Euro in Slovenia - I believe that the other countries each have their own currency. Most will probably accept Euros, the the spot exchange rate usually sucks pretty badly.

    The IDP (International Driving Permit) is required in Austria and Italy. You need your NJ license, 2 passport type photos and $15. If you have an AAA office close to you, this can be done on the spot in about 15 minutes.

    All the IDP is is a translation of your license into multiple languages - it is NOT, in itself, a driver's license.

    I get one every year, but have never been asked so show it - even when renting vehicles in Italy. They DO want to see your license though.
    #30
  11. 2WheelieADV

    2WheelieADV Been here awhile

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    Thank you all for your replies.
    Another thing I forgot to ask is the tall roads. How do you pay for them... like if there're tall boots with attendants collecting money, or the exact change needed, or tokens, or other different means depending on a country?
    #31
  12. Vixen

    Vixen Been here awhile

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    We rode 4 of them (maybe more...one pass seems to turn into another and another and then it's just all one amazing beautiful blurr). We were trying to see and do it all. Thanks for picking up my slack :thumb
    #32
  13. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    Or, as the AlpineRoads.com site puts it:

    "How to closely examine 200 metres of tarmac on the most demanding and exhilarating roads in the world.
    or:
    Scenery? What Scenery?"

    :D
    #33
  14. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    Answer - it varies.

    Germany's are free

    Austria, Slovenia and Switzerland use a sticker called a vignette which grants you access to the roads for a calendar year. Austria has a short-term tourist vignette, Switzerland doesn't and I'm not sure about Slovenia.

    Italy uses a tool booth/ticket system - pick up a ticket when you get on, pay when you get off. Service stations & restaurants are available at intervals on the road. In Milan, there are some roads that have manned booths every few kms with a toll taker. Annoying, but only around the city.

    I've never used French AutoRoutes, and so am not sure - I think that their system is similar to Italy's.
    #34
  15. Wildman

    Wildman In my castle

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    It varies. :D

    Some use the collect a ticket as you join and pay at the exit process as in Italy. At others you must pay a small amount at each toll booth. Toll booth operators are pretty decent; I usually remove left glove, present a handful of coins and they take what they need and give a receipt. There's always a small parking area to the right after each toll booth. I pull over, stash receipt, put on left glove and ride away.
    #35
  16. V Saarela

    V Saarela Been here awhile

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    I´ve noticed that Spain and France have similar, sometimes paying before, sometomes after(....or?)

    I´ve never paid in Austria or Switzerland. Have use the small roads, but lot of 60 and 80 kph keeps hard to keep the speeds. Have have get a ticket for speeding once,
    In Italy I´ve used few times autostrada. Once I had no ticket :wink: when getting out from the autostrada. Damn he was angy(Italy had lost against Germany that day in football) Got 50 euro ticket. I never got any remind for paying that.....
    #36
  17. jetjackson

    jetjackson Been here awhile

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    Spain/France/Italy all relatively the same, take the ticket and pay, sometimes it is a fixed fee and you just pay 3 euro or whatever when you reach that toll. My suggestion would be to work out how you are going to carry cash/toll tickets on the bike, if you are going to have a tank bag that would work really well, as would one of those map bags that hangs off the handlebar.

    Good luck!
    #37
  18. GiorgioXT

    GiorgioXT Long timer

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    In Italy the toll booths on motorways are of three types -
    Yellow lanes and "Telepass" sign : don't take them, are reserved for pass-through electronic payment (you need to have the RFID tele pass unit on bike or car)
    Blue lanes and "Viacard" or "Self-Service" signs : unmanned automatic booths , Viacard takes the motorway charge and prepaid cards but also all types of Visa - Mastercard - Amex as well as Maestro and Bank ATM cards - this is surely the easiest way of payment since the even don't ask for key codes or signature , just insert the ticket, then insert card and remember to retake the card..
    Self service takes also money in coins and banknotes and gives the rest (as the same cards )
    Manned booths are usually one or two and could be very busy with queues, mainly sunday and saturdays when old farts go out rambling...
    #38
  19. 2WheelieADV

    2WheelieADV Been here awhile

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    Thank you all again. I'll post in ride reports when I'll get there :)
    #39
  20. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    Ah! Grazie mille for that bit of information :D
    #40