Another orange fighter by "Carrot racing team"

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by Snowhite808, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
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    Northern EU
    Hello, again.

    Nop. The spring is not coming this year.
    At least not here. Its the second half of the March - and the temperatures are lower then they were in January. Everything is frozen and full of snow and ice and the things that the weatherman is saying - are just not the kinda stuff we want to hear...


    I still got the bug in me - no way a sunny day can keep me away from thinking about riding a little. Had some stuff that still needed sorting out.
    After the exhaust had been modified to 2-into-1 system, there would probably be some mismatch with the intake. Well - the fellow Carrot teamer lend me a hand and came to check out the carb sync. It is an easy procedure and should take one no more than 30 minutes (counting the removal of tank and some bits). I wanted to buy the proper carb balance tool - our motoshops only sell some dial versions and I wanted to have the mercury type. (used that before, that I got from a friend and was super). But money is tight and 130 EUR for that tool - not in the budget right now. So a Carb/throttle body sync tool was born.
    and here is the little one :D

    [​IMG]

    Not so little?
    HEH - if 5m of 4mm diam duct was bought then for all that worth the balancer tool got. The oil is just clean 2-stroke oil. A little thick when cold in the garage but safe for the engine and all the parts. (Red ATF is also very good). In both ends of the duct there are pnp adapters for the balancing lines of the carbs on the motorcycle. (they were already prepared on the right side of the engine during the cleanup procedures.)

    - What we needed to do?
    = Remove the glove box in the middle - remove the right tank with upper fairing, connect lines and check for balance - if out of sync, then remove the air box cover and air filter and the regulating screw is a + type on the left side of the rear carb.
    Whilst taking off the right tank - think of fuel spillage !!! :nod
    OK - so we did close that valve on the right tank but forgot that the fuel from the left one still flows. Hence - spillage, again :D
    The fuel valve was closed and bike rolled out the garage to be started and warmed up.
    NO SUCH LUCK. :huh

    The bike would crank but not start. I could hear the battery already getting weak - no charging done for quite some time.
    A few more tries and nothing. So we took turns in pushing and trying to jumpstart it - nothing again. Dead as a duck after a good coocking.
    So off comes the battery cover and out comes the battery and goes to charging for the night.
    [​IMG]


    A sidenote - the stupid holder for the SW-motech bash plate is in the way - so 2 more bolts need to be removed, to get the battery out.

    Bad batteries You say? well - this one is from 2004 and seems to be still working.
    [​IMG]

    A quote from the old computer game comes to mind here:
    "Thust You wish to leave with such a hasty abandon?"

    Nop - but there is nothing to be done, but to wait for the battery charger to do its work.

    Next day.

    0800 am I´m up and running. Stuff gets sorted at home - I run my runs and get the battery from charger. Seems full - measure 12,6V from it.
    I take my tools and run to the garage.
    And there is spillage. Again. :puke1
    The good damn right tank was supported against the wall but aparently the fuel valve did not close properly so almost most of the "good stuff" was now on the garage floor. And the SMELL. Mmmmmmm. Better not light a match in here.
    When I sat down to the computer last night the epiphany moment was not far from me. Just looked at the fuel line set up from the manual for a second and remembered - WE TURNED THE FRIEKEN LEFT TANK FUEL OFF TOO :lol3

    So in order to get things running again I plugged the right end of the fuel line with a tool, opened the valve on the remaining left tank and - -
    wait for it :D

    Spillage :D

    Plugged the thing properly and the bike started right up. After some running and heating up - I rose the revs to about 2000 rpm and this is what it looked like.
    [​IMG]

    I hope You can see the difference - it was about 3-4 inches and slowly climbing. The rear carb was pulling more vac.
    This type of carb sync tool is sensitive. But since the oil was thick from cold - the reaction is slow. Sync took about 3-5 minutes of testing and revving and letting it settle and more testing. I finally left it to about half an inch of difference - more accurate was just not possible. (compared to the small sync tools I bet it was about 1mm of difference between two carbs).
    Bike ran fine - the popping disapeared and even in rev limiter, there would be no more flames coming out the back.
    [​IMG]

    About 20 minutes of cooling and then putting everything back together.
    oiled up some connections and even installed the bash plate and cleaned the beast a little.

    So here is the monster - ready to race, or test or whatever.:huh
    You get teh idea.

    [​IMG]

    The traveling stuff needs to wait for its time - until then I intend to get to know my bike a little better on the roads and off of them :D
    #21
  2. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Todays topic - fluids.

    It cannot be described with my lack of vocabulary, what the situation is with the clutch oil on the KTM. There are possibly million different opinions for it and 5 -10 solutions for the bad slave cilinder on the clutch.
    I went with this road - took everything apart, replaced the o-rings on the piston and bought a quart of oil. RED HOT - no chilli pepper though :D
    Basically high grade ATF oil that is suitable for many purposes and seemed to fit there too. Needless to say - the old oil looked like something that comes from the oil sump of a 20yo truck engine.
    [​IMG]

    Anyhow, oil got changed - everything put back together and some testing later, it was time for the brakes.
    In the shop I asked for the normal "high grade" brake fluid - so this is what I got.
    [​IMG]

    It is just one step lower from racing fluid and with the bottle I could do easily front and rear - double flush with bleeding and testrun.
    Here one can see the old "pissyellow" fluid - was actually not that bad - absolutely worked and didnt boil even under hard braking.
    [​IMG]

    And here is the true reason for taking everything apart. :evil
    [​IMG]
    Another way to save weight. Just remove front wheel - take off the bushings - unscrew the brake disc and take off the right side brake caliper.
    Took me about 5 minutes to clean it all and take off the separate hose for the right side caliper and replace the seals and bolt the left side to the spot again.
    Here is what came off -
    [​IMG]

    Not too shabby - the most weight seems to be the bolts with the rotor. Caliper is lightweight alloy and well - the braided brake line was never going to be heavy.

    Whilst looking at the wheel now - there are two small aluminium bushings on both side. They are the ones that basically keep the wheel turning and let the seals do their work - well - if dirt gets in there, then the soft aluminium bushings will wear out and the dirt gets through the seals and to the bearings. Mine were out. Like so out - i could barely move them with force. So this was the reason, my front wheel had no freerun.
    [​IMG]

    Some new parts ordered and waiting goes on.
    It is snowing again outside. :puke1

    But I had a little chance to weigh the bike. With the fuel in - it was 205,6 kg.
    So after letting it drip out - i managed to fill one 5l fuel can and had still enough in the tanks to make it float around and start the bike normally.
    Soo - the endresult was pretty much exactly 200 kg :D
    it was 199,6-9 KG. I guess, that coming from V-strom 1000, this seems like featherweight and makes me more confident to go offroad with this bike. But after a while - probably the weight comes back on with all the travel stuff. Still leaves the bike a solid 40 kg lighter than the previous.
    ME LIKE.:freaky
    #22
  3. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    117
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    Northern EU
    Yesterday I visited the garage, to check the oil levels, install the swing arm protectors and wanted to check if all the lights and farkels are working on the bike or not.
    Needless to say - did not go that well. :deal

    After letting the bike warm up and taking a little run up and down the garage - I started checking the lights. Turning signals ok, number plate ok, front light ok, front brake ok, rear brake - non existant... :huh

    Switched off the bike and rolled back in to the garage. It was time to strip stuff again. Well - checking the wiring - basically right next to the master cyl on the rear is a small white connector for the switch that You can reach if You take off the right side rear fairing. Use a paperclip or similar, to short the wires in the connector and You should get brake light. If not - one needs multimeter to check the voltage and contacts and such. Mine worked right away. Meaning, the problem lies with the sensor. It is a brembo unit that mounts right on the cyl and works off of the oil pressure produced by master cyl in the brake line banjo bolt. There are 3 reasons why this is a crappy solution.
    1 - the electric wires are not very protected and run 1/4 of an inch from the hot exhaust pipe.
    2 - the sensor works by dirty oil pumping in the banjo bolt (easy to overheat, get stuck and just have an air bubble there
    3 - this little switch has an effect on the function of the rear brake. The accuracy and reaction all go together with the performance of the brake. The affect is small, but it is there.

    + one problem that I had with my switch - the frieken thing was leaking.

    So I took off the brake cylinder and and the switch and brought it home.
    The switch worked if I really forced some small allen key into the pressure point. But no matter how I tried to clean or make it better, nothing helped.
    So off to internet and the part is - 50311051100, costs about 14,55 EUR
    and was on the shelf at the local dealer.
    here the new vs old pic -
    [​IMG]

    Take everything back, remember to use new copper seals if You put everything back together. Here is the pic of the brake line and the position.
    Need some ideas to route the wire, so it wount get "soldered" by the hot exhaust.
    [​IMG]
    Then bleed the whole system properly and check if all is good.
    Mine was, so I did another run in the garage and took 2 pics of the beascht.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    :1drink
    #23
  4. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Just longing for some acceptance.
    Here are two pics of the new tank. No mounts on it yet nor fuel connection but the rough form is this. fits snug, weighs almost nothing and brings the range from barely 300km - 450km.
    What You guys think? - Should I paint it black or leave it aluminum?
    Should I protect it from underside?? And if i should, then with what?
    Some plastic cover or something similar to car underbody coat?
    Feel free to chime in.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    :ear
    #24
  5. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    It was a nice summer,
    and it ended even better - this here is the ending of it:
    as pics say more than 1000 words - here are some thousands of it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Anyhow - it was the last ride of the summer (autumn) and after that accidental offroad part - the bike was pretty beaten up. The front sprocket lost 2 teeth, the head of the engine was full of oil spillage and the exhaust leaking pretty bad. Also lost the heated grips function and broke the chain guard on the swingarm.

    Since my bike had some other issues also - I purchased a new frame from geramany. It costs a lot. And yet it made a man very happy to get that one morgning "in post".
    Now - this is before getting started with the work in garage.

    [​IMG]

    Well - the new trellis frame came from germany and this needs replacing.
    With that some parts witch coinside with it and then everything that needs servicing and relocating or replacing on whatever.
    In a couple of hours me and my friend Munk -took it all apart.
    And I mean all.
    This is what was left - we are trying the new frame to the engine here -
    [​IMG]


    Everything still needs cleaning and checking but the swingarm guard was torn and bent and needed changing.
    Here is a pic old-vs-new
    [​IMG]

    According to the ktm dealer it needs not to be replaced before it basically rips. Mine did, with a little help in the woods :D

    And here is the old front sprocket.
    [​IMG]
    The teeth are all tilted, two are broken and the whole sprocket is bent a little. So I counted the teeth. Literally - and many times. To my surprise there were only 16. So - hard decision now - what to get for the new one.
    Well after countless checks on the gearcommander and online and checking my usual riding habits and miles and so - I went with the original 17 teeth and with the rubber softening on the sides. (ok - it was pretty cheap this time).
    I will try this out in the springtime and if it does not work with me nor the bike, it will be replaced.
    OH - if anyone still thinks maybe one could fit a 18 teeth sprocket there - nop. The original 17t has less than 1mm clearence to the swingarm.
    [​IMG]

    Next job is to fix the leaking Djelcevich exhaust and stuff the silencer again.
    Then I will probably tackle the "jerking head" of gps mount and make it the Rally style and weld some strengthening rods to it.

    Until then...:freaky
    #25
  6. GrenDesb

    GrenDesb Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    331
    Location:
    Québec
    Why are you replacing the frame?

    I didn't find the reason in your last post.

    Did you finish your aux tank?
    #26
  7. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Hellou!

    Todays topic - the muffler. (silencer, endpipe, endtopf...).

    But first things first - To answer Your question "GrenDesb" - the frame is being changed, because mine was having some - hmmm - legal issues. :1drink
    (basically was an insurance writeoff and i used my friends numberplate for the summer - now also I have no idea of the state of the old frame, as to how straight it might be or not.) Well, the new frame is in great shape and I believe if I can, then in april it will be rolling officcially under my name.
    Second question - the tank is finished - I used the ktm tank connector for the lower part and it was very nice. Not using it - well - because the aluminium tank is too weak and got cracks in it the first time I tested it. Sadly - need some other solution and at the moment a 5l external tank (jerrycan) will probably have to be enough. I´m running on a very tight budget this winter, so we can plan our trip to Russia and Georgia and be ready for any trouble with the bikes and stuff. Hope this explaines whats up.

    Now todays topic - the bike´s silencer was leaking. Making funny noises and needed proper cleaning and repacking.
    It is a light SS pipe from Djelcevic UK and I really like their products for the cost that they are. This is here, what I started with:
    [​IMG]

    Just a matter of drilling out the rivets with a 4mm drillbit and pulling the end off of the pipe. The packing was considerably "blown" on the ending side of the pipe. Just pull the insert out and check for any other problems.

    [​IMG]

    After getting it all apart, it needed some proper cleaning from the tar stains and some gunk that probably comes from chain or dirt or whatever flies around under there.
    Then after cleaning and inspecting stuff I decided to use the "stockings" from work, that I have - they are used to insulate heat of the adheater exhaust and made of long fibre.
    Just pulled the "stocking" over the pipe snugly and pulled the ends back and tightened them up with metallic fasteners.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Then it was just a matter of taking the insulating wool or material to be used again and I have always used the method, that i repack the muffler so, that none of the material goes to the same spot it was before. Getting it all back into the shell was a mot.... PITA but with pressing the insulation material from both sides equally and yanking it down finally made it. Nice and snug.
    The only mufflers where the material has been sewn together or through, have been Remus and Sebring. Never seen them fail early either. Just sayin.
    New rivets, little bit of engine sealant (also called engine silicone - capable withstanding more than 350 celsius) to insulate the endcap and voila.
    Thats it for today.
    [​IMG]
    #27
  8. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    So - its time for the forks to get serviced.
    I only have 8900km on the forks after service.
    And the oil is filth. The valves are almost jammed and there is so much overheating going on in the forks. The rebound adjuster was stuck and the aluminium tube was full of burnt oil. Why so fast???
    Suppose the oil chosen was too thick for our side of the weather. It is mainly cold here - and the 5w oil does not do its work properly.
    I will try the motorex 2.5W as next and adjust the forks to stock.
    The oil level will be set to 120mm as suggested by the WP and hall of wisdom.
    Then - we´ll see in the springtime, how stuff works in the rough stuff and under more load and travel weight.
    Here 2 pics of the "damage".
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #28
  9. srad600

    srad600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    690
    Location:
    Oakland, Kalli Fornia
    Too bad about the Aux tank, it looked great. Was it just the wel'd failing or was the aluminum used too thin?

    Nice work on the rest of the bike. :freaky
    #29
  10. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Northern EU

    Thank You very much.

    The aux tank aluminium was 1.8mm and the welds and holders more than 4mm. Made from the same stuff they make aluminium boats. Needless to say - the tank had strengthening cuts inside and "chambers" but the ripping power of bad roads on the tank holders is just too much. They started to tear from the welds and also just the bare material started to rip open.
    So I suppose it had too little suppport or too small support. I did plan to make a fastener also to the side - but I was really afraid of falling with the bike and having spillage. Not good to have gasoline spillage with a hot exhaust and other parts meeting.
    So now the plan is to create side cases with holder for a 5l jerry can. This should do most of the needed job as well. Have been to some trips with bikes and at one point - extra fuel has always been needed. :1drink


    Next up will be new oil to the forks, spark plug change and putting the nose back together. (still waiting for the new heated grips and stuff.
    #30
  11. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
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    The forks have problems.
    For what i can tell, the rebound needle springs are missing from both legs.
    I tried to follow everithing else also by the book and find something out of the ordnung, but it seems that these are the only things missing. So tomorrow will order new ones with some o-seals for the needles.
    Basically just took the forks totally apart and counted all the parts drawn on the diagram of the service book.
    Makes me really angry/sad of my own failure to notice that problem the last time i took them apart. Needless to say - I fear that I might have lost the springs myself but the needles are made of soft material. Brass or similar - and I found no sign of them being surrounded by any springs. Could there ever be a possibility, that the factory forgot to install them in the first place? Don´t know and don´t blame this on anybody. Just need the parts now and new oil and proper assembly.

    Spark plugs.
    I bought a thin walled socket - was not thin enough apparently. :D
    So friend lend me the original KTM special tool and mine went to the workshop to be grinded down to the special tool measurements.
    Why not buy one? Well - I will not pay them excess of 20 eur to have a simple socket - when the one I got from the shop yesterday cost me 2 EUR.
    Just want to have the tools my own too.
    Alright - the plugs came out - in good shape and it appears that the A/F mix is totally spot on also. The endpipe has insert in it and the needles are in the 3rd from the top slot.
    Here the usual new vs old pic of them. (noo, they did not need to be changed, but i like to be sure).
    [​IMG]

    Brembo on the rear.
    Well - the pads are toast. Should I guess they are still the original pads from brembo?? Maybe - toast they are and I need new ones.
    [​IMG]

    I seem to missing something from the bottom of the caliper also :D
    Looks like one of the clips, that tentioners the pads, is missing also.
    [​IMG]

    Cleaned the caliper, the pistons and fluid reservoir and now just need to order parts.

    Exhaust.
    Installed the improved pipe back to the bike. Just a few bolts and little persuasion and it was done.
    [​IMG]

    The new nose and the handlebars.
    I bolted the handlebars back on and started routing the lines back.
    Finally just ripped the bloody cables from the old rubbish heated grips off.
    Cut the rest of the crap off and removed the operating unit.
    I will be getting a new one anyway - so why bother if its on the way.
    [​IMG]

    Well - tomorrow is a good day as any to write to santa - so the list is going to be long :)

    Over out.
    #31
  12. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Sunday.
    A week before thanksgiving.
    Bike is waiting for some parts to arrive on wednesday from Mattighofen and I had a chance to visit some other shops yesterday. Did not get much but proper ferodo brake pads for the rear brembo. Nice ones - they really seem to have a lot of metal in them, so I hope they brake well.

    I cleaned and worked the rear shaft and the bearing seals.
    Put the rear wheel back on and installed the brake pads.
    With the new sprocket, the chain runs a little tight.
    I turned the chain tightening regulators down a bout 5-7 mm and then it fits just snug. I suppose the trail of the bike is now shorter, so the bike should handle a little better also. Cleaned the chain and lubed it up properly and got it running nice and quiet. The new 17t front with rubber outer ring makes for a smooth ride I think.

    Once the rear wheel was on, the bike was set on the center stand and it would tilt itself nice and quiet on the rear side.
    It was now good to remove the trolley from underneath the bike and have a look at the undertray of it and let it bleed.
    So out came the oil. Thick, brown, full of the "flakey" stuff, that it usually is.
    I did the flow and the stickage test on fingers and must say- the oil was just fine. Of course not as good as the sample from brand new, but good enough, I think. I cleaned the oil screens and fillers and the little "ball" on the oil tank and checked the filter for any fluttering and water damage, nothing wrong. New oil filter and oil is needed. There is plenty of time for them, but to be sure, I think I put them in the "list". Probably will use the same oil - 10W-60 Liqui moly racing.
    Also had some time on my hands, so pictures were taken and some will be shared with You guys/girls.

    New vs old
    [​IMG]

    Here the rebound needle, that seem to be missing the bloody spring from the bottom, so it gets stuck and is not interfearable.
    [​IMG]

    The new pads in the caliper.
    [​IMG]

    Artistic schmartistic pic of brembo.
    [​IMG]

    Old oil.
    [​IMG]

    Engine left side.
    [​IMG]

    Engine right side.
    [​IMG]

    The new "rally style" nose piece. Its pretty stiff and hopes are high, that it will be enough to have no more stupid head wabble.

    [​IMG]

    Mitas - E09 dakar. After 5k km.
    [​IMG]
    #32
  13. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

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    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Soo this is christmas,
    and a happy new year....


    ;) There was a song or something similar like that.

    Well, santa brought me and the bike some stuff that went into work right away.
    I got a new, linkage mirror for the bike.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Not OEM quality part but fine enough and makes me street legal - so I´m happy with it. Cost me 21 EUR and bits.

    Then I was really missing the blow-off - valves on the front forks.
    Basically - riding on the wabbly gravel roads and then some for 1000 miles and the forks stiffen up - because of the type they are, they pump air into the cartridge and that makes them harsh. Then one needs to bleed them from the little screws on top of them. I hate that. I forget to do it and have them stiffen up every longer ride and event and that just sucks.
    Well - 16 eur later i have the small buggers.
    [​IMG]

    just unscrew the original screws (5mm screw with a small o-ring) and replace them with the bleeder valves - no need to overtorque, they are soft material and so are the fork tops and there is a new o-ring with the valve.

    Here is the fork top before:
    [​IMG]

    Here the bleeder vs screw:
    [​IMG]

    And here the little valve all installed:
    PS! bare in mind - put the bike on the center stand and unload the forks for the swap.
    [​IMG]


    I also got a pair of racing summer gloves and new gore-tex gloves from rev-it and some long socks for the Astars tech 8 boots and then moved on to some more delicate matter.
    Namely - my suffering arse.

    I already did a superb new seat for the bike once. It worked just fine - until the cushioning material let go and i felt the pain again.
    This time - the material (special foam, made for sport mattrasses) was tested over the summer in an "enduro like shape" and the material held just fine. Just the shape and the overcoat (leather) was not exactly to my liking.
    So I started with yet another touring seat concept. It got the same basic shape as the last time - slightly rised the height and narrowed the sides.
    The cowling effect is more pronounced this time and it should support a little more. Hope it is not a bitch to climb aboard and off.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Suppose i should hope that new year will be a good year to ride :)
    Maybe I´ll get some more done still this year, but i doubt it.
    Have a nice one everybody and may the new one be adventoures and full of orange color!
    #33
  14. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Hello-hello.

    Tons of stuff to do and many parts to make/change/improve/develop and so on.

    First things first - i got my new frame and bike registered and a numberplate on it installed.

    A ton of tires were ordered and arrived. 3 sets of E09 dakar for the racing team and 1 special set for me to get some testing done on the C19 enduro tires. (supposedly the strongest stone/gravel enduro tires that mitas makes) - well see, how the ktm will eat them.
    Here is the stack of them.
    [​IMG]

    Then, the new brake pads and fluids installed, I thought I´d add some carrot flavor to the brembo calipers and painted the signs.
    Fits just right. At least to me.
    [​IMG]

    Then there is the constant head wabble and the softness of the nose piece of the 950 adv. It actually involves all the ktm-s that have a bigger nose piece and the light section hanging from it (including fairing and such).
    Basically what You have is a piece of aluminium plate that is welded on 2 tubes, that are located to close together. This causes the nose to be soft and prone to brake and bend and wabble under road vibrations. Also makes the gps loose and unreadable on bad roads and the connectors to come loose etc... We welded the "rally style" rods to the nose piece to give it more rigidness and now it was the time for the gps undermount to be strengthened. Just welded a stiffening rod to the mount (at the moment carring the telephone/gps bag - soon to be replaced for garmin montana or monterra).
    So here it is, welded, painted, bolted through plastic and onto the metal mount with SS bolts.
    [​IMG]

    Next, the wheels.
    I was trying to get the big covers for the rims. It is something like thing polycarbonate cover for the rim sides and will protect them during offroad and tyre change. Sadly - the answer I got from the dealer was, that only for factory racers - sooo, no goody for me. Instead I settled for the usual rim stripes of KTM, they do at least the job of making the rims look a little more alive. Would like to paint them one day though..
    [​IMG]

    More improvements.

    Like to ride standing upp?
    The big mx boots make u even taller?
    Don´t reach the handlebars nice?
    Need bar risers?
    Sure, no biggie - uuuups!
    So they cost more than 100 eur around here.
    We decided to take matters into our own hands and developed a kit for these. Since at the moment, we have three bikes, then 3 of them were introduced. Kit involves new stronger and longer bolts for the pillars and 4 distance aluminium spacers (each 18mm thick and M10 opening).
    Total rise - 32mm and backwards moved about 5mm. A lot more comfortable on the hands and back, whilst standing upp.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Then there is one more saddle.
    The older S models had a sporty type of saddle. Basically mx type, where the seat is all one piece, with not much comfort nor support and the rear passanger would have the seat so much tilted all the time, that it would be impossible to stay in place and not run down to the rider.
    Here is were I started.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And after measuring some butts and pieces - this is the progress in pics.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    No more than 46 EUR worth of materials and 4 days of work later, this is the result and I hope the newly seated will be pleased.

    Here is a little teaser of whats to come in near future...

    [​IMG]
    #34
  15. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Hei-hei.

    So it was a long time coming idea of ours, we needed a new screen for the bikes.
    So clay mould was made and fiberglass nosepiece was born.
    The shape and the size and the weight is to be recognised as "pretty gooood" but the function - well, thats another story. I must say - it is nice, that it protects the gps from debry and trees and such - but is in no way helping with rain or wind. So I don´t know, maybe it might work for shorter guys but I´m exaxtly 6ft and have a pretty firm high seat - so nothing.
    Here some pics of the stuff - used fiberglass, hand molding clay from kids store, the blue stuff is fiberfiller.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Then i switched the tires on the bike - just to save the E09 dakar-s for the trip and test out some more radical versions of Mitas - so front got the C17 and the rear got C05.
    Now, to test out the bike, i took a little reroute on the way to my cottage and left the asphalt and took the small road to "shitmabautobrakealeagville"!

    so here is what happened.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2cpw3uBu6E
    #35
  16. Orangecicle

    Orangecicle On a "Quest"

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,456
    Location:
    West Des Moines, IA
    Ouch! Maybe time for some Doubletake mirrors?
    #36
  17. HeatXfer

    HeatXfer Bad knees

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Oddometer:
    764
    Location:
    S.F. Bay Area
    Reading all these posts in one sitting is a little surreal. It feels like I'm a 'Casino Royal' universe. :confused
    #37
  18. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Don´t really use mirrors but i think about the long lever DT mirrors too - or at least one.

    and Yes, it still is OUCH.
    :shog
    #38
  19. Snowhite808

    Snowhite808 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    117
    Location:
    Northern EU
    Hmm - CR universe ?
    Full of beautiful women and fast boats and some shaken martini?
    :D
    #39
  20. HeatXfer

    HeatXfer Bad knees

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Oddometer:
    764
    Location:
    S.F. Bay Area
    Now you got it! :thumb

    BTW - HDB mirrors are great
    #40