any tool to help picking up your adventure in the mud when you are by yourself?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by shin938, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. shin938

    shin938 Adventurer

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    Hello
    I dropped my 1150 adventure more then once, I can pick it up and I know the methods of doing that.
    but few day ago I dropped it in the mud, there was no way I could pick it up by myself, the mud is too slippery and you can't get a hold on the ground. I tried a lot, I was lucky and some people passed by after an hour or so and helped me.

    I wonder, is there a solution for this situation in the form of some tool that can help? I can think of a lift handle or some kind of air bag or something, does anybody know of something like that?

    Thank you.
    #1
  2. gratefulJED

    gratefulJED long strange tripper

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    a rope at the very least
    #2
  3. everycredit

    everycredit Been here awhile

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    What methods are you using? The only two methods I'm accustomed to are lifting and pushing. I can understand pushing is traction-dependent, but lifting is not, except theory and real-world applications don't always mesh. That said, my limited knowledge might be more or less expansive than yours and "common sense" and "common knowledge" never really applies.

    I can squat lift quite a bit of weight, but I've been blessed with strong legs. Because of that, I may not have pursued other avenues of lifting my GS.

    Think of mechanical advantage. Can I use a lever or a pulley?
    #3
  4. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Long timer

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    I hate to state the obvious, but this is exactly why I don't do that sh!t when I'm riding by myself. I'll ride gravel but no sugar sand, no deep mud, without a buddy.
    #4
  5. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    I understand, but sometimes you either ride through the mud or turn around and sometimes turning around is not a good option or even possible.

    The problem of mud is a real one. While I carry pulleys and a rope, you still need an anchor point. It will be interesting to hear of solutions and options.

    Before anyone cries "idiot", I also do ride alone, off road and way out beyond help...my choice, but I try to be well prepared for issues like this one. Amplify that by sliding downhill on a steep slope. Sometimes walking out is the last option.:wink:
    #5
  6. everycredit

    everycredit Been here awhile

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    Not riding in the first place may be the obvious solution, but your bike is still in the mud. Hopefully there might be better solutions presented. :)
    #6
  7. sportbiker929

    sportbiker929 Been here awhile

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    tow truck, crane?
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  8. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    Man, only someone from the 'Delta' would suggest that :D....well that is better than 'stay home and don't ride'...you forgot a helicopter extraction..
    #8
  9. Osmin C

    Osmin C Been here awhile

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    So if there is no anchor point to play with, there really isnt much more option but to lift it out of the mud. No clever mechanism or winch will work without an anchor point. :huh
    #9
  10. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    Me too and if there is water and/or mud, I walk the trail first to find the best line. But there is always the possibility I could lose my bike or more. I am aware of it and accept the possibility.
    Last year was a bad one for me. I dropped the bike 3 times, twice on grades with the top of the bike downhill. I was able to muscle the bike up but I don&#8217;t know how I did it, desperation I suppose. :evil<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    #10
  11. divimon2000

    divimon2000 Been here awhile

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    The lift bag has merit. They use them to move barges. What around is portable, tough, and fillable with what? I dunno, just relaxing on the couch, glad I have a little 650.
    #11
  12. kellymac530

    kellymac530 motorcycle addict

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    #12
  13. spagthorpe

    spagthorpe Long timer

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    If it's deep enough, the bike isn't going anywhere even if you pick it up.

    I have seen at least one inmate that carried a ground anchor and a come along when he rode in questionable places. There is that small electric winch you could mount as well. Biggest issue is finding things to attach it to.

    Obviously my asshole level suggestion is to use a lighter bike for riding like that. It's probably one reason nobody is doing the TAT on an 1150.
    #13
  14. Ayrshire Bull

    Ayrshire Bull why the hell not?

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    one more asshole level suggestion from me too - was use an XR650 ...... for the further away, rough terrain, solo rides
    #14
  15. kellymac530

    kellymac530 motorcycle addict

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    I get so sick of people always saying dont ride your bike there...get a better bike....buy a lighter bike {KTm, XR, DR, KLR....}

    What if the OP and others like me do NOT want a different bike?

    I want to ride hundreds of miles on the hiway, and when I see something cool, I want to ride off hiway there, If there is mud on that trail or road, I will ride through it. If I fall I will have to pick it up. The OP is just looking for ideas on making that easier in tough circumstances. Not how to revamp his life to conform to what YOU think it should be. :huh

    I have had MANY KTMs, a DR, 2 XRs, and ridden a KLR...I do NOT want one of those. I do NOT like any of those on the hiway. Can they go there...sure. Do I want to ride cross country on the I-40 on a DR...hell no.

    Personally I can not resist riding small light bikes like they were MX bikes. I always do. I always break them, and sometimes break myself. I want a hiway bike that CAN go out in the dirt, one I KNOW I need to respect and take it easier on so I can still get back where I want to get to off road, but not feel motivated to double jump that ravine, blast that sand berm, and blitz some row of whoops.

    I know I will drop a GS once in a while and I will need to pick it up in sand and mud....that is all the OP is asking :deal
    #15
  16. ThumperStorm

    ThumperStorm Long timer

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    Maybe this - "Warn® Industries has come up with a great solution for adventure riders seeking the most grueling of terrain, and another tool to make their solo rides more successful. With their new XT17 Portable Winch, mud bogs, deep sand areas, and swampy terrains become non-issues. (Of course it&#8217;s not just for solo rides, but also for those who&#8217;s companions aren&#8217;t a big help when pulling and pushing bikes out of mud!)

    Weighing in at just 8.5 lbs., the XT17 can either be mounted to your motorcycle or stored in a sidecase, luggage bag, or wherever you see fit. Once needed, the winch quickly plugs into the included wiring harnesses (you would have previously installed) and operated by handlebar controls, uses it&#8217;s 1,700 lb. pulling capacity to get your motorcycle or ATV out of whatever situation you&#8217;re in. If the included 40 feet of synthetic rope isn&#8217;t enough, just add-on extra luggage straps you brought along after having learned how to pack for your adventure ride."
    #16
  17. UAS

    UAS Been here awhile

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    Old trick I read for a winch anchor was a danforth type boat anchor. Once in the ground then the more you pull the better they dig in. It wouldn't take much of one, but whether there is one small enough or light enough for a motorcycle, I don't know.
    #17
  18. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    I looked long and hard at this option. First I am a proponent of not adding any more weight to a GSA for off road use and secondly to load all added weight as low as possible to help the CG. The Warn winch at first blush is great, but it has a shortcoming that must be understood. You must have the motor running to use the winch, the battery alone will not sustain the winch and allow you to restart the motor....too much power pull on a battery if the motor is not charging it..wish I had a kick starter! :D

    So for off road, bike down...I can't run the motor and must be able to stand the bike upright and start it before a winch could be used.

    I called the Warn people and talked to the techs...they verified that the motor on a GSA would need to be running to power the winch.

    Close but no.....:wink:
    #18
  19. BeachMoto

    BeachMoto Been here awhile

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    BestRest sells a motorcycle recovery system. I have no first hand experience with it but the concept is sound.

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/1DnDCWvVEag" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>
    #19
  20. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    This demonstrates why I carry two double pulleys...basically what is described on this video...but with double pulleys you gain even more mechanical advantage...

    There was or is another kit out like this one in video, can't remember the name.

    Advantages are light weight and can be used solo....still, like the person in the mud above; you need an anchor close enough and stout enough to tie into.

    Oh yes, at $179 I think that is very expensive...you can put it together for less.
    #20