any tool to help picking up your adventure in the mud when you are by yourself?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by shin938, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. rboett

    rboett posser noob 205

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    used to have a Fortress Anchor on my boat, these knock down and stow nicely. never thought I'd need it on my bike.

    they really dig in.

    http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wc...&subdeptNum=50319&classNum=50323#.UPTTdG8715I
    #21
  2. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Took me an hour, and laying it down several times, to get it out. Branches and sticks. Helps with traction for me and the bike.

    Jim :brow

    PS I avoid this by not taking unfamiliar dirt roads after a rain these days.
    #22
  3. LaurelPerryOnLand

    LaurelPerryOnLand Long timer

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    Even the 'bears' knew this:

    If you go down in the woods today you better not go alone
    It's lovely down in the woods today but safer to stay at home
    For every bear that ever there was will gather there for certain
    Because today's the day the Teddy Bears have their picnic.

    Great memories...long ago.:clap
    #23
  4. xymotic

    xymotic Long timer

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    double pulleys and a LOT of 1/8" amsteel or Vectran line. Doesn't take up much space/weight and is very useful.
    #24
  5. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

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    Would some burlap and or a tarp have helped gain traction in your situation?

    I like the pulley system idea.

    I got stuck in some suction mud once. It held the bike upright with no kick stand or center stand. It was winter, mid 30s clear skies the sun was setting and I was in the middle of nowhere 100 miles from home.

    I got off the bike accessed the situation and my first thought is this pig (R1200GSA) is heavy and I am screwed. I got behind it and tugged it back a few inches at a time until I was in harder mud. I rested, put my gear back on, avoided mud and high tailed it home.

    I was torn between labeling it a successful Adventure or a dumb ass move.
    #25
  6. RichBMW

    RichBMW Long timer

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    Just do what Ewan and Charley do, and take a support crew in a truck with you:lol3
    #26
  7. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

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    i can lift my r100gs quite easily.But i can assure you it is quite a different proposistion if the ground you are standing on is not flat AND is slippery.As you lift the bike up you push with your feet to get it from mostly horizontal to mostly vertical.If the ground is slippery you cant.
    #27
  8. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Not a GS, but yeah, similar problem with my bike.

    Get some seatbelt webbing (ebay or car wreckers) and some large D-rings (ebay). Get the D-rings sewn into one the end of the webbing so it's like a helmet fastener.

    Rolls up to about the size of a ciggy packet.

    Unroll, thread one end through the frame or crash bars, adjust the length, slip the loop over one shoulder, cinch it up and stand using the loop of belt material and your leg strength to lift the bike, makes it a LOT easier. It can also be used to drag one end of the bike around though I've never needed to do that.

    I have a slightly lighter bike than a GS, but it falls over further without the jugs sticking out the sides. Getting old, office job, so not particularly fit or strong and that makes it relatively easy to lift the bike solo.

    Pete
    #28
  9. tagesk

    tagesk Tuscan rider

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    Not mud, but the problem is similar: No grip.

    I carry a 20 meter high-tensile rope. By attaching to a tree, and inserting a stick to twist, I can get enough
    pull to help me drag the bike out of "tight spots". Ropes used by climbers is what I use; light weight, "soft" and
    easy to work with when the fingers are cold, and very strong.

    Yeah, yeah, I'm not proud of the judgement that landed me here, but that's the issue of another thread.

    [TaSK]
    #29
  10. krellheat

    krellheat Milk Crate Challenged

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    650GS stuck in river mud consistency of pudding. Past ankle deep no leverage to pick up the back out of the rut. Eventually got out by building a solid base from downed branched and logs.

    My point is - does not matter what size bike it can still get stuck; getting there is the fun part, getting unstuck is rewarding.
    #30
  11. Spaggy

    Spaggy Long timer

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    #31
  12. bemiiten

    bemiiten League of Adventures

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    Couldn't find the link but someone makes a small, lightweight block and tackle that might help as long as their is something to hook it to. Other then that you need to find whats available in your surroundings ; Rocks , logs ECT...
    #32
  13. krellheat

    krellheat Milk Crate Challenged

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  14. donmac

    donmac casual angler

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    I suspect there's a bit of CYA in Warn saying that the engine needed to be running. Given a healthy battery and a short time on the winch, I suspect it would be fine. I had a larger Warn on an ATV that I used often and a larger Warn 'winch in a bag' for my snowmobiles. I used the winch in a bag several times after getting my large 2-up touring sled uprighted and out - while out sledding by myself. No way I could have done that by myself. Note that the sled engine was not running when it was upside down and being uprighted by the winch. ;)

    The concern about mounting the weight high is not a concern with that portable setup - you'd leave the winch at the anchor point while in use, not on the bike. Storage would be at the bottom of you pannier.

    If I did a lot of solo snow/sand/mud riding with the GS I'd grab one of these portable winches and a spare battery. However, based on your riding style (and mine) it would probably be way overkill.
    #34
  15. trc.rhubarb

    trc.rhubarb ZoomSplat!

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    Looks like no traction at all. How did the rest of that day go?
    #35
  16. tagesk

    tagesk Tuscan rider

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    Ride Report in my Riding in Tuscany-thread, here.

    [TaSK]
    #36
  17. trc.rhubarb

    trc.rhubarb ZoomSplat!

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    Thanks! Looks like a good read
    #37
  18. FTBTX

    FTBTX Adventurer

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    I know they make sand anchors for self extraction of trucks, maybe something similar could be used for a bike in the mud? It could provide an anchor point for a block and tackle.

    http://www.pullpal.com/aboutPP.html
    #38
  19. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    A rope puller doesn't have the same line length limit a comealong does, your only limit is the amount of rope you're willing to carry.

    The best mud extraction technique I've come across is the flop and spin or flop and drag, where the jug is supported by a mass of branches and the bike is sufficiently elevated on its side so the wheels are out of the rut they made. You can then drag it sideways and either spin to go out or continue flopping and spinning until you reach firm ground. Instead of relying on found branches or rocks to support the jug, a 1'x2'x.75" slab of UHMW Poly would make a nice (if rather short) sliding surface. The plastic is very slippery, it wouldn't take much effort to haul the head across it.
    #39
  20. Ayrshire Bull

    Ayrshire Bull why the hell not?

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    #40